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CALIFORNIA ir 

STATE LIBRARY 



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California State Library 



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INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY 

SEPTEMBER 13, 1916 — SEPTEMBER 5, 1917 



All editorial matter is designated by an as- 



terisk (*). 
Titlo 



No. Page 



"Abandoned" vs. "Forgotten" * 42 

Abstainers, Total 40 

Adarason Eight Hour Law 2 

Alaska, Bone Dry * 29 

Alaska Fishing Privileges 18 

\laska River Navigation 34 

Alaska, The Riches of* 17 

Albania 45 

American Federation of Labor — 

A. F. of L. Power Defined 6 

Progress or Reaction? (Appeal for 

Woodrow Wilson.) 8 

Structure, Growth and Development 

of A. F. of L. 11 

36th Annual Convention Proceedings 13 
Attitude on War Defined by Trade 

Union Official Conference 28 

French Envoy Visits A. F. of L. ... 36 

Tax on the Labor Press 37 

A Criticism of Samuel Gompers (By 

Geo. P. West) 49 

America (see U. S.) 

America Discovered in 458 35 

America's Inland Seas 32 

Amsterdam 10 

Ancestry, Facts Abcut Our 43 

"Appam" Lost by Captors.. 28 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Lemieux Act Condemned by Canadi- 
ans 6 

Involuntary Servitude, Compulsory 

Arbitration in Norway 10 

The "Country Without Strikes" *. ... 15 
Senator Borah against Can't Strike 

Law 17 

Freedom Must not be Surrendered 

(by Samuel Gompers) 19 

Canadian "Compulsory" Law is Value- 
less 21 

Making Strikes Illegal * 21 

Making Strikes Unlawful (by Ralph 

M. Easley) 22 

Archangel 19 

Arctic Explorers, Stores for 42 

Arizona Deportations, The 47 

Argentina, News from 20 

Argonaut Editor in a Muddle * 18 

Arizona Mining Profits 18 

Aryan Races 40 

Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc. — 

Japanese-American Relations * 5 

Importing Chinese Seamen * (for S. S. 
Venezuela) 7-6; 11 

Japan, American Propaganda in 7 

Chinese Crews Denounced at British 
Trade-Union Congress 11 

White Versus Yellow* (Manning of 
British Ships) 12 

Pierced By the Truth * (Organiza- 
tion of Japanese Workers) 21 

Coolie Labor in Europe 22 



"Colusa", Chinese Imported for 

Asia For The Asiatics * 

Coolie Patriots Busy * 

Chinese Labor Not Wanted (State- 
ment by California Immigration 
Commission) 



24 
30 
35 



36 



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3 

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2 

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Title No. Pagt 

Coolie Patriots Answered (Cal. Labor 

Commissioner's Statement) 38 

Chinese Labor Not Wjnted (by 

Walter Macarthur) 38 

Citizenship for Japanese * 41 

What Japan Has Learned 45 

Labor Conditions in Japan 48 

"All White" or "All Yellaji" * 48 

Japanese Colonization cr ) 

As Others See U- 

Atlantic Agreement. 

Atlantic Agreement S 

Austrian Ships Purch&s 

Australian Seamen, Etc- 

Australians to Tnve 
Australia Against ( i 

Home for Australian 17 

Australasian Seamen Iterate 18 

Australian Labor Party Split 27 

Unkind Words in Australian Seamen's 

Journal 40 

B 

Balearic Isles, The 1 

Barton, Dante, Dcatli of* 49 

"Behind the Times" * 18 

Boat, 3618 Miles in an Open 46 

Boats, Open * 47 

Bonus System Devoid of Justice 24 

Bonus System, Evils of the 31 

Boston, Doings at (by Percy Pryor) . . 25 

Boston Light ." 40 

Brain Work? 44 

Brazil's Great River 48 

Bread, The Cost of 45 

British Government Attacks Seamen's 

Law * 52 

British Labor, Future of 42 

British Labor Minister Interviewed.... 46 

British Merchant Seamen 36 

British Seamen's Conference 14 

British Shipping Profits 19 

British Social Conditions Described.... 38 

British Trade-Union Congress 6 

British Transport Workers 48 

British World Dominion Unimpaired.. 46 
Brutality on Schooner "H. K. Hall" * 

9-7; 10 

Bryan on the "Nation's Duty" 23 

Bucharest 13 

Bucko Mate Escapes * 9 

Budapest 15 

C 

California Farm Labor 39 

California Jingoes, A Word to * 16 

California Labor Camps Cleaned Up... 27 

California Mine Output for 1916 19 

California Schoolship for Merchant Ma- 
rine * 33 

California State Ship Subsidy* 26 

California State Federation of Labor, 

Eureka Convention 5 

Call of the Sea, The (address by Rev. 

Chas. P. Deems) 27 

Canada's Timber Resources 48 

Canadian Censorship 32 

Canary Islands, The 43 

Cape Colony 36 

Cement on Ships' Bottoms 2 

Censors, Would-Be, Rebuked 50 

Channel Islands, The 22 

Character Qualifications * 9 

Child Labor Day * 20 



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Title No 

Child Labor, How it Developed 29 

Chilean Nitrate Fields 29 

Chile, Population of 45 

Civilization (by Geo. Brandes) 47 

Coal in Germany 3 

Coal .Mines in Iceland \{ 

Coast I .ight, Oldest ' 24 

Coffee and Butter Yarn, A * 21 

Cold. What is a^ 23 

' ' ado. Peace In 33 

■• * 18 

cS 

' 
I 

9 

' ■ ' 

''.-ill we 
• I ■ . 1 bj 

1 
40 
Cop, 

Courage, I'ain Death 

Court De<. : "'ons J rifi Labor, Etc— 

Seamen's Law Upheld. Foreign 

"ion's Right to one-half of Wages 
( The " I xion") 2 

Citizenship of Licensed Men (Execu- 
tive Order) 2 

Pacific Mail Suit * (Chinese imported 
for S. S. Venezuela) 7-6; 11 

Wages for Return Voyage (Judge 
Dooling's decision in re S. S. 
"Maona") 9 

"Mackinaw" (Robert Dollar Co.) case 
appealed to Supreme Court 10 

German Sailors' Law Void in United 
States Ports 11 

Construction of Seamen's Act (Com- 
ment by F. R. Wall) 16 

Seamen's Right to Quit (Decision of 
Judge Hough) 18 

All Forecastles to be Improved. (At- 
torney General Reverses Redfield's 
Ruling) 19 

Treatment of Injured Seamen. 
(Schooner "C. S. Holmes") 21 

$4000 Damages to Sailor for Negli- 
gence of Master (S. S. "Break- 
water") 22 

The Question of Half Pay (by Silas 
Blake Axtell) 22 

Seamen's Act in Court (Comment by 
Attorney Axtell) 23 

Section 4 of Seamen's Act (Comment 
by Attorney Wall) 25 

Advance Wages Not Recognized 
("Imberhorne" Decision) 27 

Freedom Clause Sustained (S. S. 
"Manhattan" Decision) 28 

Seamen's Act Again Sustained (Judge 
Wolvcrton's Decision in re Ad- 
vance Wages) 36 

Advance Wages Unlawful (Judge 
Veeder's Decision in re "Rhine" 
and "Windrush") 39 

Aliens As Ships' Officers (Executive 
Order) 46 

No Bonds Required of Seamen 49 

Proof of Seamen's Nationality 49 

Seamen Recover Wages (Judge Chat- 
field's Decisions in re S. S. "Dela- 

1" and S. S. "Westmeath") 50 

Crete, Island of 1 

Crini4 and Criminals * 42 

Ci imping Legalized in Oregon? 21 

Czar, How He Quit His Job 40 



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COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY 



Title No 

D 

Damage Bv Plutocratic Papers 50 9 

Danish West India [slands 34 

Democracy •• 4 '' 

Democracy, A Challenge to (by Ceo. P. 

West) |0 1 

Democracy. Ideals of 44 * 

Democracy (?) In India 39 11 

Demon of the Strait. The (by F. A 

MitcheD }4 B 

Denmark, Seamen's Wages in.. 13 / 

"Deutschland," German Submarine Car- 

rier 1-8; 13-13; 16 14 

Distorting the News * 48 6 

Dollar's (Captain I Troubles* 40 7 

"Dry" Vote in California* 23 7 

Dual Unionism (by Wm. E. Foster)... 4-5 > 



Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Ass'n (Doings 

at Boston) 25 

r Island 7/ 

i r Island 

"Ecuador", Scab Crew of the* 6-7; 

7-6: 8-6; < 

Educating the People* « 

Shall il be Rockefellenzed? 28 

Eight-Hour Dav Essential 9 

Eighl Hour Workday, The * 17 

Employment Shark, The* 35 

miii Memorial, The 4 

Erzerum ., 

I spionag< Law, The New 41 



Concerning the Ocean 19 

Versus I (U. S. Tonnage 

in Foreign Trade* 25 

Faith, The Power of 19 

Female Labor In Shipyards 32 

Figureheads, Reviving the 44 

Finance, High 1 

1 inku ortunity * 30 

Fisheries, Etc. — 

Alaska Legislature's 



tax 



X. 



Right 
I- isl 
Kelp and the Fisheries (bj 
Scofield 

mixing * 

- 



Fish Thrive on War 

! listribution of Fi in 1916. . . 

Sealing Vessels Lost 

Fishing With Cormorants 

Artificial Fishing Banks 

Whaler, The "Lay" of a 

Floating Safes for Ships 

Food I r/ibargo, Why? (by led) Harri- 

man) 

For Better * 

I Indesirable * 

'. Gloomy, (by Prof, fra B. 

Cross i 

Franci in * 

Freakish Rivers 



in. Two Kinds of 

Free Speech and Free Press (bj Harry 

Weinberger I 

Fugitive Slave I. aw Resurrected 

Furuseth, Andrew, Articles by, Etc. — 

Furuseth's Plain Tall le 

Space 22 

FurUSeth On tin Seamen'- Act 

F. W. Ely Interviews Furusetl .. 30 

Furuseth's Letter on Apprentice Ques 

tion 33 

American Sea Power and the Sea- 
men- Vcl 52 

Future of American Seamen (Addn 

by Silas Blake Axtell) 2\ 



German Colonies, The 31 

German Names In America 44 

Germans in East Africa 8 

Gold, If We Could Eat * 25 

"Good" and Bad Unions * 2 

"Good Old Times", In The 43 

liineiit By Banks"' 33 

Great Lakes — 

Lake Erie Sturm of October 20 (4 

vessel- sunk i 9 

ening of the Erie Canal 11 

Welfare Plan Scored 50 

Steel Trust Patriotism * 51 

Abandoned Wrecks to be Rehabili- 
tated 52 

eks — And Their Gifts (by Grant 

Hamilton) 9 

Greenland, Throwing in 12 

Gulf Stream. Antics of the 37 



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Title No Page 

H 

Hamburg in War Time 9 11 

Have-. I). A.. Death of 19 10 

Health Insurance. Compulsory 31 1 

Health. Your 3 8 

Home vs. The Lodging House * 29 7 

Human Wastage, The Repair of (by 

David Starr Jordan) 42 1 

Humboldt Hay Lumber Shipments 19 5 

Humboldt Pay ( Cal. i Shipyard Pur- 
chased by Mayor Rolph 27 5 

Humphrey, Congressman, Retired to 

Private Life * 2 7 

Hygiene, What Is" 45 9 

Hypocrite, The 36 2 

I 

Iceland 24 9 

Immigration, Etc. — 

Immigration Figures 2-3; 5-3; 11-10; 43 13 
Commissioner of Immigration Howe 

Vindicated 2 7 

Immigration Problem, The ( Facts 

about new L". S. law) 30 1 

Immigrants In America * 49 7 

Inauguration of President Jackson 14 11 

Independents. Muzzling the * 24 7 

India. Democracy (?) In 39 11 

Industrial Freedom! * 9 6 

Industrial Relations Commission's Testi- 
mony 22 7 

Injunctions, Government by, Etc. — 

Judge Denies I' ree Speech 2 3 

St. Louis Drivers Enjoined 3 3 

Injunction Used in Boycott 32 Id 

'Labor's Bill of Rights" * 36 6 

A "Kosterized" Governor * (Veto of 

Anti-Injunction bill in Cal.) 39 6 

Carpenters Win Injunction Case in 

U. S. Supreme Court 42 3 

Injunction Stopped When Strike is 

Lost 48 3 

Injunction Judges Rebuked 51 6 

International I'm ling * 51 6 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

Seamen's Act Ruli irt Decisions) 

2 2 

* 6 6 

Criti- 
6 8 

PI: it Able Sca- 

aw? 12 1 

invention * 12 6 

- Repi irt * 13 6 

tngi est * 13 7 

Figures Cannot Lie, But — * 14 6 

Xew Problems due to "The Panama 

Canal" * 14 7 

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Con- 
vention 15-1; 16 2 

Fraternal Delegates' Speeches 17 1 

Report of Legislative Committee.... 17 7 

The Language Test * 19 6 

American Seamen's Future (bv Silas 

Blake Axtell) ' 21 1 

1. S. U. of A., Finances * 24 6 

Licensed Men Protest Construction 

of Language Test 26 9 

\ Blow at Foreign Crimps * ("Im- 

berhorne" Decision) 27 6 

The Language Test (by Dante Bar- 
ton) ' 32 7 

Manning American Ships 33 1 

retary Hai Repi irl 34 1 

American Merchant Seamen 35 1 

■id Eff< ' 'I Vnnian on the 

Seamen's Act) 38' 6 

Secretary Hanson's Report 41 2 

Mr. Redfield's Rulings * 41 6 

Native Seamen Coming Back * 43 6 

portunities for Seamen * 44 7 

Washington Conference, The 45-6 ; 

49-6* : 5(1 1,6 

Legal Aid Society's Endorsement of 

Seamen's Act 45-6*, 8 

lien's Insurance In Force :: 45 

Manning Problem. The * 47 6 

Seamen'- Law Attacked 1>\ British 

Government 52 6 

Interned Ships, Repairs On 38 2 

I -lam. The Future of 5 9 

- of the Presidential Campaign * 8 7 
I. W. W. ism. Plutocracy Responsible 

for 47 1 

I W. W. Panhandlers. Beware of the * 50 7 

T. W. W's See The Light * 46 6 

J 

Jones', John Paul. Naval Victory 12 9 

son, Hiram W. Resigns as Gover- 
nor of Cal. * 28 

Johnson (Senator Hiram W ) At The 

Bat * 33 6 

Johnson's (Senator Hiram W.) PI 

for a Free Press 39 1 

K 

Kings, The Lot of * 41 6 

Kultur Is Winning 48 8 



Title No. Page 

L 

Labor Dav Message, A (by John P. 

White) 51 7 

Labor for the Farms 35 11 

Labor in South America 26 I 

Labor in St. Croix 52 2 

Labor's Early Struggles 29 

Labor's Internationalism 42 11 

Labor Press, Muzzling the 40 

Labor's Silent Weapon * 26 6 

Lack of Fresh Air at Sea 37 2 

La Follette's Vindication * 16 7 

Lane. Death of U. S. Senator * 38 6 

Lawson, John R.. Belated Justice for * 41 6 
"Law and Order" Committee of S. F. 
(see San Franci - 

Libel- A Difference In 43 9 

lifeboat Rules. Xew 38 11 

Lincoln on Labor 23 2 

Lincoln vs. Hughes* 3 6 

Life on the North Sea 3 11 

Limitation of Output ; 4 7 

Lion and the Mouse, The 2 11 

Literacy Test, The * 23 6 

Lloyd's Register Returns 10 15 

Lumber Shipments by Pacific North- 
west Mills in 1916 28 5 

M 

Margarita, Island of 44 11 

Marine Engineers Charter * 14 o 

Masons for Eight-Hour Day 2 9 

Members, Control of * 46 6 

Merger of Pa< 1st S. S. Co. and 

Alaska Nav. Co 4 5 

.Mexican Workers Cain Freedom 27 3 

Millionaires and Paupers * 43 6 

Mine Workers' Union, The 18 9 

Minimum Wage Law for Women Legal 35 3 
Minimum Wage Legislation (Paper read 

by Paul Scharrenberg) 34 6 

Missing Ships 36 14 

Moore, Mrs. Helen. Death of * 23 7 

Mutiny in Port * CS. S. "Ilarinia Maru"l 23 6 

N 

Nationalization of Shipping 19 11 

Nearing, Scott, Articles by — 

The Railroad Shambles 7 9 

The Room at the Top 8 2 

Man and Machine 9 9 

The Railroad Wage 10 8 

One Fourth and Four Fourths 11 9 

We Want to Know 12 9 

Billionaires 15 9 

Lvnchings and Murders 16 11 

Peace and Plenty 17 10 

i-Pre-ent landlord 19 9 

Prosperity and the Great Fear 20 9 

America's Economic Tragedy 22 11 

As The Twig is Bent 23 11 

Speaking of Slavery 24 11 

The Cost of Living 2? 9 

Who Is Doing It To Us? 28 2 

Where The Good Things Go To 30 2 

Preparing For The Deluge ?1 2 

Living on 33 Cents a Dav 31 9 

The Robbers 32 2 

( )ur Country 33 11 

"Of All Sad Words" 3? 8 

iking of Rights 36 9 

I Inert Action 37 11 

The Menace 38 2 

Farewell to Meat! 39 2 

Win, Will Pay!- 41 9 

Democracy or Plutocracy? 42 10 

A Bund for Baby ' 44 8 

The Business Side 45 10 

The Immortality of a Dollar 46 11 

Putting it on the Worker 48 2 

Eat, Drink and Be Merry 49 11 

Mixing Them Up 50 9 

Monopoly Power 51 11 

What Will It Buy 52 9 

1 ust ( )rganize 47 3 

Xew England Fishermen's Strike *.... 39 6 

Norway's Greal Industries 36 2 

Norway's Merchant Marine 43 11 

Navy, Getting Rich in the 6 2 

O-P 

Oil Burner in Galley 32 9 

Open Shop, Principle of the * 52 6 

Opulence vs. Thrift 47 2 

Organization 23 9 

Oregon Crimping Bill. The 21 10 

Oregon Crimping Bill Buried * 24-6: 26-11 

Our Day of Rejoicing (Wilson Fleeted) * 10 7 

Pacific Mail Finances * 1 6 

Panama Canal — 

Regulars in Canal Traffic 5 5 

Area of Canal Zone 6 11 

Length of Ship- Passing Through 

Canal "• 5 

Canal Traffic 16 10 

Panama Canal Tolls in 1916 27 5 

Nationality of Ships Passing Through 

Canal 38 6 

Pan-American Labor Unity 24 7 

Paraguay, The Republic of 49 7 

Party Lines, No 52 



17531 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY 



Title No - Page 

Patriotism (by W. B. Rubin) 37 2 

Patriotism Not Submission 39 9 

Patriotism vs. Prejudice (by Prof. J. W. 

Stimson ) 42 2 

Petrograd 14 8 

Pitcairn Island 30 10 

Plague, Bubonic 7 8 

Plimsoll Mark, The* 9 7 

Plutocracy Responsible for I. W. W.'ism 47 1 

Poetry— 

An Ambition 4 11 

The Ninety and Nine (by Rose Eliz- 
abeth Smith) 8 8 

Sea Dreams (by Dennis A. McCarthy) 14 11 
The Sailor's Consolation (by William 

Pitt) 15 11 

Cape Horn Gospel (by John Masefield) 28 8 

Rill (by John Masefield) 34 2 

Spunyarn (by John Masefield) 36 9 

'Whatsoever Thou Soweth" (by Dora 

V. B. Chappie) 43 11 

The Stoker (by Berton Braley) 48 9 

The Fatherland (by James Russell 

Lowell 49 9 

The Pledge (by W. E. Williams).... 50 11 
My Comrade Enemy (by Richard 

Warner Borst) 52 11 

Poland 42 11 

Police and Military 10 7 

Population of Canal Zone 51 13 

Porto Rico Votes for Prohibition 48 13 

Postal Savings Increasing 22 13 

Postoffice Censorship, The 51 9 

Poverty Causes Babies' Deaths 47 2 

Preservation of Sea Power 25 8 

Presidential Election Returns, Complete 19 13 

Prophets. Among the 46 9 

Prosperity, Evidence of* 4 6 

"Public Pays. The" 8 9 

Punishing "The Slackers"* 42 6 

Q 

Queen Victoria's Children 8 8 

R 

Race Riots, Facts About 45 1 

Record Voyage (Destroyer "Shaw")... 49 10 

Red Cross Society, The * 47 6 

Rivers, Freakish 25 9 

Robinson Crusoe, A Modern 30 11 

Russian Exiles, Return of 33 2 

Russia, Revolution In * 28 6 

Russia, The Spirit of Old 47 8 

Russia's Future * 35 6 

S 

Sacrificing Industrial. Rights 42 2 

Sailors' Snug Harbor 23 7 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 

Delegates' Report (Cal. State Feder- 
ation of Labor) 5 1 

Resolution relating to work with 

Longshoremen 6 7 

Stories of Bygone Days (by Frank 

Rooney ) 10 1 

Resolution Opposing Anti-Strike bill 

in California Legislature 22 10 

Sailors' Union Benefits (by I. M. 

Holt) 25 2 

Oregon State Federation of Labor 

(Delegate's Report) 25 11 

The Union's 32nd Birthday 27 2 

Revised Wage Schedule and Working 

Rules, Printed Copies of 39 7 

Strike in British Columbia * 44 6 

$500 Donated to Red Cross Society.. 47 7 

B. C. Strike Ends by Compromise * 45 6 

DECEASED MEMBERS. 

Abbott, Fredrik J 34 7 

Andersen, Jens Knudsen 40 7 

Armstrong, Henry 10 7 

Bagg, Robert William 41 

Bentscn. Alfred 18 7 

Bitterman, Andreas 27 7 

Bjornlund, Axel 39 7 

Carlson, Otto 27 7 

Chapman, Joseph Fay 12 

Christiansen. Nils 34 7 

Deans, Robert Silvester 10 7 

Ekman, Joseph Emanuel 43 

Ericksen, Charles Johan 29 7 

Erickson, Axel 16 / 

Fenlon, Richard 3 7 

Fitzgerald, Charles W 42 7 

Gotcseon, Olaf Ninus 9 7 

Gravit, Karl Julius 49 7 

Gray, Wendell T 5 7 

Gregory, Joseph 18 7 

Ileinonen. Hugo 40 7 

Horlin, Ernest. 38 7 

Hurnanen, Carl August 25 7 

Jaakkola, Japht 49 7 

Tames, Peter 45 7 

Jensen, Peter 35 

Johansen, August 10 7 

Johanson, Johan Arvid 42 7 

Johnson, Herman 28 7 

Johnson, Andrew 41 7 

Johnson, Louis Victor 42 7 



Title 



No. Page 



Jonasson, Carl Axel 9 7 

Jonsson, Johan 15 7 

Kiviniemi, Uno Emil 33 7 

Kraft, Ernest Harry 47 7 

Krohn, Charles Emil 10 7 

Lange, Peter Brandt 34 7 

Lauritzen, K. A 26 7 

Lie, Jens Ludvig 29 7 

Lindqvist, Franz Michael 41 7 

Loving, Axel 34 7 

Lockman, Thorwald 26 7 

Lynch, Thomas 25 7 

Makela, Gttstaf Wilhelm 32 7 

Mattson, Mathias Emil 49 7 

McDonald, Keneth 7 7 

Michelsen, Rudolph 40 7 

Milschewsky, Albertus, T. A 10 7 

Montenegro, Jose 1 7 

Nakstrom, Alexander 3 7 

Nelson, Charles Lorenz 4 7 

Nilsen, Christ Frdriick 4 7 

Nilsen, Wilhelm 34 7 

Nilson, Johan Peter 9 7 

Ohlsen, Waldemar 18 7 

Olausen, Elias 7 7 

Olsen, Charles Anword 45 7 

Olson, Ascar 4 7 

Osterman. Victor 43 7 

Peters, William 21 7 

Peterson, Axel Otto Walfred 42 7 

Peterson, Carl 13 7 

Poison, Herman 25 7 

Rantala, Anders 41 7 

Reid, James Stewart 10 7 

Ritter, Richard 14 7 

Sandell, Jeff Herman 31 7 

Schager, Ernst L 14 7 

Schultz, Gustav F. W 18 7 

Schmidt, Carl Frederich W 29 7 

Scott, Emil Gabriel 12 7 

Stoessle, Camille 23 7 

Terkelscn, Alf Anton 22 7 

Vanderendt, George 1 7 

Weber, Walter Richard 29 7 

Weit, Gustaf 31 7 

Welure, John J 4 7 

Wickman, Mouritz 24 7 

Wilson, Philip S 13 7 

Winters, Alexander 44 7 

Younger, Oscar i 

Salt Water as a Healer i 11 

Salvage for Crew of 

San Francisco — 

Another "Union-SI.' 

(Maritime Builders C i tnci 

Purifiers or Conspirators? (' 
Order Committee sued) 

Arrivals and Departures Increasing.. 

Progress of Shipbuilding at S. F. *.. 

Koster Still Explaining 

"Law and Order" 8-11; 19-6*; 

Lawless "Lave and Order" * 

Truth Versus Fiction (Review of 
Law and Order Booklet) 

San Francisco's Survey * 

Ferrymen's Working Hours * 

Our Class Juries * 

Foreign Trade During 1916 

Sailors' Day at S. F. *....' 

Mr. Fickert's Frame-UP 

Smoked Out ! * 

Prosecution or Persecution? * (Rena 
Mooney Trial) 

Law and Order. What Is? (Cal. State 
Fed. Letter on .Mooney Trial) 

Egotism Personified (Frederick J. 
Koster) 

Fifteen Thousand Anarchists * 

Rena Mooney Acquitted * 

"Outside Agitators" * (S. F. Carmen's 
Strike) 

.Mayor Rolph Answers Koster 

San Pedro, Cal., Longshoremen's 

Strike Called Off 

Saving the Clay Pipe 

Schools for New Citizens 

Sea, Color in the 

Sea Language and Sea Dress 

Seamen's Right to Vote * 

Seamen's War Risk Insurance 

Sea Power, Preservation of 

Sea Power.* 

Sea Power, What Is? * 

Seditious Agitation * 

Shackleton Visits San Francisco....... 

Shanghai 

Shanghaiing Scientific 

Shipowners New Allies * (The I. 

W. W.'s) 

Shipping Finance * 

Ship Subsidy, California State * 

Ships, Sale of * 

Siberia 

Social Insurance 

Social Unrest, Causes of 

Sofia 

Speed of Ships in Deep Water 

Spending Your Own Money (by Rob- 
ert Hunter) 20 





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41 


11 


12 


2 


40 


6 


37 


6 


26 


7 


24 


6 


34 


11 


12 


2 


22 


7 


7 


11 


41 


11 



Title No. Page 

Strike, A Notable American 7 1 

Strike of Unorganized Workers at Ba- 

yonne 9 1 

Strikes, A Cure for * 7 6 

Strikes, Sympathetic 10 9 

Submarine, Life on a 14 2 

Submarines, Attacks by 31 8 

Submarines, Braving the 37 7 

Submarines, Chasing the 51 2 

Submarines, Trapping 52 2 

Submarining, Material for r 39 8 

Sunken Ships, Locating 43 9 

Suppressing the News * 44 6 

Survey Steamer for Alaska 47 2 

"Sweeping Changes" * (in U. S. Steam- 
boat Inspection Service) 22-6 10 

Swiss Navy, The 23 8 

T 

Taft's Humor 37 9 

Tankers, The Value of * 49 6 

Taxation, Single Tax, Etc.— 

Confiscatory Taxes? 3 2 

The Lesson of Rosiclare 6 9 

An Anti-Poverty Bill 7 2 

Homeseekers' Opportunities 8 8 

California's Main Trouble 21 8 

The San FVanciscn "Land" Shark.... 22 7 

Land and Labor 33 11 

Land Monopolists Must Go 41 2 

Tenants to Royalty 45 11 

Tide Machine, Government's 50 11 

Timber, Merchantable, Standing in the 

U. S 23 13 

Timber Workers' Strikes, The 48 2 

Tips. Bonuses or Wages? * 43 7 

Todd, Laurence, Author of "Our Wash- 
ington Letter." See issues 18 52 

"Too Much" or "Too Little"* 3 7 

Tortoise Islands. The 40 10 

Trachoma Is Curable 21 11 

Tracy, Tom, Death of 11-3 6* 

Treasure, In Quest of Sunken 40 8 

Trend of the Times 25 2 

Trieste 5 11 

Tristan Da Cunha 20 11 

Tuberculosis Most Deadly 39 3 

Turtle. The Intelligent 31 2 

u-v 

31 2 

20 8 

13 



u. S. 

U. S Mei 

U. S. Merchant aiai in< Stati 

U. S. National Parks 

U. S. Naval Reserve, The * 27-6; 33-7 

I'. S. Naval Reserve Force. The 40 

U. S. Navy, Feeding and Clothing the. 52 

U. S. Navy in War Strength * 29 

U S. Navy, The "Best Fed" * 19 

U. S. Oil Fleet Growing * 39 

U. S. Pilotage Laws 44 

U. S. Shipbuilding Problem. The * 40 

U. S. Shipbuilding, Progress of 7 

U. S. Shipbuilding in 1916 19 

U. S. Shipping Board, The Xew 16 

U. S. Shipping Board. Members of. ...20-1 

U. S. Ships and Seamen (Report of 

Commissioner of Navigation) 24 

Q. S. Steamboat Inspection Service Re 



Stelzle, Rev. Chas., Articles by- 
Weekly Day of Rest 11 

Snobbishness Among Workers 30 

The Reformer 39 

Develop Cheerfulness 41 

When Failure Wins 49 



11 
9 
2 
9 

10 



poil 



17 



I". S. Steamboat Inspection Service; 
Changes Suggested by Secretary of 
Labor 22-6* 

Viking Relics Unearthed 46 



10 
11 



W 

Wage Equalizing * 45 6 

Wages Versus FYeights * 42 6 

Wages vs. Prices * 33 6 

"Walking Delegate," The 6 11 

Wall Street's Americanism 6 

Washington Letter, Our (bv Laurence 

Todd). See issues 18 to 52 



War, Militarism, Conscription, Etc. — 

Labor and the War * 1 

Peace, A League to Enforce 1 

War Risk Insurance Profitable * 2 

Politicians and Preparedness 2 

Conscription in America 3 

After the War, — What? (by Samuel 

Gompers) 4 

German Labor and the War 4 

Real Preparedness 5 

Conscription of Wealth 7 

The Folly of War 8 

Australia Against Conscription 9 

Peace Enforced by the Sword 

Educating Cannon Food 10 

Real Preparedness (by W. B. Rubin). 14 

Security or Conquest? * 16 

Nations Involved in War 16 

What Are They Fighting For? 18 

The President's Message * 20 

Why Must the War Go On? 20 

\ Soldier \eainst Conscription 21 



7 
9 
2 
8 
11 

9 
2 
6 
15 
2 
6 
7 
7 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX- VOLUME THIRTY 



Title No. Page 

Enter— America ! * 22 6 

What An English Soldier Said 22 8 

Why Not a Referendum? * 23 6 

War Prosperity * 24 6 

Protest Against War, A 24 2 

Labor for Food Embargo * 25 6 

Militarizing the Nation * 25 7 

Survival of the Fit. The (by Prof. I. 

W. Howerth) 26 2 

Coming Worl . A 26 7 

\ Basis for World Peace * 27 7 

A. F. of L. Attitude on War 28 1 

I". S. Senate Filibuster, The* 28 6 

The Russian Revolution * 28 6 

the Profit Out of War 28 

A l'r Conscription (by 

Amos Pinchot > 29 

Armed Merchant Vessels * 

mtry at War * 30 

•Thus Far and No Further" 30 9 

rv Military Service * 31 6 

War Prosperity * 31 

Why Not pi Wealth? 32 

'■n War * 32 

al * 32 6 

Historical Fai tin by Na- 
tionalities in Civil War) 32 11 

and the War (l)y Grant ! 

ilton) *3 3 

Why Our Country Is at War 33 

Munition Patriots, The 33 9 

Tin- War Spirit in Washington (by 

Grant Hamilton") 34 3 

onscription 35 3 

i is of the War 35 9 

War Debts, Old and Yew 36 

War Risk Insurance * 36 6 

The Mouth Patriots* 36 7 

Information on Draft Registration... 37 6 

Conscripting Property 37 6 

I". S. Destroyers Arrive at Qu. 

town 37 11 

Gompers on Conscript Law 39 3 

War and the Cos ing I \d : 

by \nio- Pinchot l 41 

Why Are Wc at War? 42 9 

War Risk Insurance fi n 43 1 

Fundamental Rights Espoused (by 

Senator La Follettel 46 1 

By-Producta of War. The * 46 7 

"Uncivilized" Lands, The * 47 7 

Rules Governing Draft* 47 6 

How Wars Will End 47 7 

The Term- of Peace * 48 6 

Our Country's Past War- 48 7 

War Risk Insurance * 48 7 

Things Making for Peace 48 r) 

The Spoils of Viotory (by .lob Har- 

riman I 49 2 

\n Ultra-Idealistic Dream * *9 6 

La Follette v n bar go 49 10 

War Insurance for Sailors and Soldiers 52 1 



Title N" Page 

Justice the True Peace Basis 51 2 

Stockholm Conference, The * 52 7 

Wealth, The Conscription of 52 9 

Weather Factor in War, The _8 8 

West Indies. Natives of 50 9 

Whaler, Model of a 47 10 

What I Require in Life (by Francis 

Ahern) 29 9 

Wilson and Hughes, Records of 3 1 

Wire!. r-ol of 51 11 

Womei I S. Navy * 42 6 

Workers Don't Own Homes 39 10 

Working Women's Conclave * 38 6 

Workmen's Compensation — Sic 
it Decisions) 

Predictions vs. Results -' 3 7 

Compensation for Seamen (by F. R. 

Wall) 4 2 

Simple Justice * ( Federal Employes' 

npensation W i 9 6 

California's Compensation Act * 17 6 

Cal. Supreme Court Holds Coi 

tion Law Applies to Seamen 23 1 

New York Compensation Act (Com- 
ment by Attorney Axtell) 26 2 

W hat I .aw Is Law ? ( Comment 

Attorney Hogevoll) 27 9 

1 mportant \ >r Seamen i S. S. 

ommunipaw") 28-10; .^-7 

Damages vs Compensation * 37 

Compensation for Aliens * 38 1 

Rights of Injured Seamen (Judge 

Hand's Instruction to Jury) 38 7 

No Compensation for Seamen (Coin- 
Attorney Wall on U. S. 

Supreme Court Decision) 39 2 

Seamen'- War Risk Insurance 43 1 

Seamen'- Accident Insurance 43 6 

Wrecks — 

Admiral Clark 5 14 

Alcatraz. M 7 

i Pay 50 5 

■- Ryg 47 14 

Avenger 6 14 

Aztec 31 15 

Bandon 1-5; 5-5; 7-5; 8-5 

Pay Port 41 14 

Bay State 7 14 

ir 

1-5; 2---: .1-5; ?-?; 8-5; 24-5; 31-5: 38-5 

Bogota 13 14 

Braemar Castle 14 15 

Britannic 13 15 

Brown Brothers 36 14 

Burcombe 16 14 

Carelmapu 51 5 

l 'armela 51 14 

Catherine 44 14 

C. B. San ford 49 14 

Cetriana 28 ; 



Title No i 

Congress 

2-5, 6*; 5-5; 10-5; 24-5; 27-5; 32-5; 33-5; 36-5 

Connemara io 1? 

I iizeo 26 5 

Del Norte 48-5; 50-5; 51-5 

Detroit 2 14 

Dirigo 42 14 

Eastland 34 14 

E. P>. Jackson 24 5 

Eureka 27 5 

Excelsior 36 5 

Franconia 5 15 

Freda 2 14 

Grief 10 15 

Grilse 16 15 

llealdton 30 2 

"II. 3" (U. S. Submarine) 16-5; 19-7 

Ivernia 18 15 

lames 1 lagan 40 14 

J. Holmes Pirdsall 6 14 

John Hays Hammond 51 14 

Kansan 46 7 

Kotohira Maru 50 5 

Laconia 26-15; 29-15 

l.aurentic 22 15 

Lyman M. Law 24 15 

Manga Reva 36 14 

McCulloch 41-7: 50-5 

Merida 3 14 

Milwaukee 20-5: 23-5: 25-5: 2<-? 

Missotirian 31 15 

Montmagny 5 14 

Motano 49 6 

Mozelle 46 5 

Muskegon 47 14 

Oakland 46 5 

Panama 4 5 

Pcro d'Alemquer 8 14 

Pio IX 19 15 

Quebra 4 14 

Raymond 26 5 

Roanoke 24 5 

Rob Roy 14 15 

R. P. R'ithet 49 5 

Riverside 41 5 

Samuel Blandford 2 14 

Saronic 3 14 

Seward 34 14 

Shna-Yak 7-5; 20-5 

Sinaloa 41-5; 42-5; 45-5; 47-5 

Sorland 47 14 

St. Catherine 52 5 

I gnace 6 14 

Sumner 16 14 

Takayosi Maru 29 5 

Victorian 1 5 

Yankee 51 14 

Writer. Qualities of the 2 10 

Y 

Youth. The Gospel of 52 10 



■^ I 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXX, No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1916. 



Whole No. 2399. 



CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS! 



What Shall We Do With Law-Breaking Judges? 



The Constitution of the United States and 
the Constitution of each and every State in 
this Union guarantees to every citizen, to every 
man, woman, and child, to every individual, 
whether native or foreign, citizen or alien, the 
rights of free speech, free press, and free as- 
sembly. 

Things We Were Told in School. 

We were told as children in the school-room, 
and since we are grown up we have been told 
over and over and over, again and again, by 
every orator that has ever spoken, every pub- 
licist that has ever uttered a sentence, by poli- 
ticians, haranguers, statesmen, scholars, and 
teachers, that those rights are fundamental; that 
they are inalienable; that they are as free and 
necessary as the air we breathe; that they were 
purchased for us at the cost of the most pre- 
cious blood that ever man shed, in the Revolu- 
tion for the freest country God ever looked 
down upon. These rights are invaluable — they 
are more — they are essential to a free people. 
Without them we would be slaves and subjects, 
we would have tyrants and oligarchies. With- 
out them man can make no advance, no prog- 
ress. With them man gazes upward and counts 
the scintillating stars of hope, for in those rights 
lies the hope that to his way of thinking, others 
will come, that others will multiply and multiply 
so fast that his thoughts, his dreams, his wants 
will be translated into law, interpreted into com- 
mand, and observed in obedience. It matters 
not how worthless and hopeless, impractical and 
visionary those dreams and desires may be or 
prove, but that he shall have access to them by 
the route of free speech, free press, and free 
assembly is the inherent right of every man 
who stands upon American soil, and the person 
who would deny any one such rights, no matter 
how humble or low he may be, or how inane 
his thoughts may seem, so long as they do no 
violence to the body politic or the rights of the 
community, is a tyrant of the Nebuchadnezzar 
type, an accuser like Fouquier-Tinville, an op- 
pressor such as King George III, or a persecu- 
tor of the Czar Nicholas kind, regardless of 
what else he may be, or what title he may have. 

He who takes air from you asphyxiates you 
and commits murder, and he who takes from 
you any of the rights of free speech, free press, 
and free assembly murders your hope, tortures 
your aspirations, kills your ambition, assassinates 
your thoughts, and brings ruin and disgrace 
upon the whole community. 

Judges, Too, Are Human Beings. 

Let us not mince words, and let not fetish- 
worship for the moth-eaten, ancient precedents 
borrowed from an antediluvian age when free 
speech, free press, and free assembly were not 
yet born, overburden us with awe and close our 
lips in silence, merely because the one who 
would thus throttle the rights of man happens 
to be called a judge. Whether he be a judge 
of the police court or the highest court of the 
land, whether he got his job by being ap- 
pointed because of political services to some 
politician with the right to make such appoint- 
ments and thus create judges, or some erstwhile 
corporation lickspittle, he is nevertheless a tyrant 
and an enemy of free government, and so much 



more offensive if though honest and able, he is 
obsessed with ancient, inhuman conceptions of 
the wrongs he has caused to mankind. 

We are told that every workman has a right 
to work for whom and when he will and cease 
his labors whenever he is so inclined; that he 
has the right to persuade others to his way 
of working or his time of ceasing to work; that 
numbers lend strength in the asserting of a 
right and not in the turning of a right into a 
wrong. Upon that fundamental, labor organiza- 
tions have been founded; in that spirit, labor 
unions have been cradled; and in the light of 
free workmen have labor unions budded into 
real, giant manhood. 

The time has gone by so long that now only 
in the archives of history do we look for ab- 
stract, desultory, entertaining reading, of ancient 
historical and theoretical value merely, that a 
combination of labor is an unlawful conspiracy, 
and that any member of it is an outcast of the 
law. 

We, too, have progressed, and have gotten 
away from some of the decisions that used to 
hold that, though a labor organization may be 
a lawful body, an unlawful act by any member 
of it, taints the whole organization's lawfulness 
or legality, and makes the organization unlaw- 
ful and illegal. Such decisions are no longer 
respected. They have been overridden by every 
enlightened court in every enlightened country, 
and by States, some of which have not yet been 
enlightened, in this Union. The overruling" of 
those decisions was essential to the fair, honest, 
and moral consideration of the rights of free 
speech, free press, and free assembly guaran- 
teed by all constitutions. 

Free Speech in the Fight Against Capital. 

Upon the right of free speech is founded the 
right of moral suasion, of moral inducement, by 
one worker to another, to have him join in his 
fight against capital. The power of persuasion 
has ever been a human, mental attribute. It 
would seem that this right was such a natural 
one that no constitutional provision would be 
necessary to preserve it. But the people, know- 
ing the way of tyrants, have made it a special 
act of constitution, under the caption of "Free 
speech." 

How else can one workman urge another and 
remain within the law? How can one capitalist 
induce another capitalist to join him in his fight 
upon Labor except by suasion? Shall it be by 
violence, force, assault? That surely can not be, 
for that engenders war. How can two men 
stay at peace with each other, how can two 
have communion with each other unless that 
right of suasion be absolutely, unqualifiedly, and 
wholly guaranteed? 

To deny the right of suasion is to incarcerate 
man in solitary confinement, is to take from him 
all the joy, power and love in life. It is to put 
him upon an island, surrounded by guards, in- 
structed to kill him at the first utterance of a 
sound. This is so self-evident that to enlarge 
upon it would seem a waste of effort, and yet, 
because of the conduct, or, let me emphasize, 
misconduct of judges, it becomes necessary that 
all this be made so palpably patent to you that 
you will heed and join in the call for action to J 



rid this nation of such judges, and to save to 
its inhabitants their constitutional rights. 

Free press is another form of free speech — 
perhaps broader, more enduring and farther 
reaching than free speech. Upon that right is 
founded the principle of labor press — Labor's 
magazines, Labor's circulars, guaranteeing these 
to use the same suasion towards his fellows that 
a workman could by free speech. How else, in 
the name of common sense, shall Labor make 
its wants known? How else shall Labor emanci- 
pate itself? 

Claptrap About the "Dignity of Labor." 
We hear, yes, the very tyrant judges say, that 
they believe in the dignity of Labor; that 
Labor should have a fair share of its product; 
that Labor should participate in prosperity; that 
Labor should have shorter hours, higher wages, 
better working conditions, and that Labor should 
be encourage* in getting all of that. But how 
can this be accomplished if the right to com- 
municate those desires to his fellow by speech 
or pen is denied the workman? Can anything 
more asinine — yes, more asinine — be conceived? 
Yet such are the decisions that are handed down 
to Labor from time to time. 

Free assembly is the preceptor to the right 
of peaceful picketing. When the employer locks 
out, or the employes go out on a strike, they 
become economic adversaries, each contending 
for_ supremacy, both hoping for an adjustment. 
It is only natural that they should endeavor to 
discover each other's strength and weakness in 
order to determine how to continue the struggle. 
It is only natural that they should do that 
which every individual does, which every busi- 
ness competitor does, which every nation does, 
to wit, use the right of espionage, and how, 
pray, can espionage be employed and observations 
made, unless free assembly be given them? 

If, in the case of strike or lockout, the streets 
to the shop be closed to the workmen, if the 
streets which are open to the ignorant or knave 
strike-breaker be closed to him, if his home be 
shut to him, if the meeting in the highway or 
elsewhere be denied him, how will he be able to 
meet his fellow-worker or the worker who, 
either ignorantly or wilfully, has taken his job, 
to persuade him to exercise his constitutional 
right of free speech and free press, so that he 
may induce his transgressing brother to see 
the error of his way and join the ranks of 
organized labor? 

Several Very Pertinent Questions. 

Do you stop to realize that the Fourteenth 
Amendment to the Constitution of the Urn 
States prohibits the abridging of privileges or 
immunities of citizens of the United States, and 
forbids any State to deprive any person of life, 
liberty, or property without due process of law, 
nor deny any person within its jurisdiction the 
equal protection of the law? 

Do you know that the life and liberty of a 
labor organization consists in its membership 
.nul its ability to increase and hold its member- 
ship, and in the liberty of being able to in- 
ie and hold its membership by moral suasion 
and peaceful picketing? 

And do you further realize that though the 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



employer may induce a man to break the ranks 
of labor and go to work, an employe may not 
induce an employe to break the ranks of his 
employer and cease work? That while an em- 
ployer may exercise espionage and send out his 
emissaries for the purpose of picketing upon 
union men in order to get them to go back upon 
the union obligation, union men may not do 
likewise — exercise espionage upon the employer? 
Do you not see that that is denying men the 
equal protection of the law? Need any more 
questions be asked? There is but one single 
answer. 

Enough, for all of this must be plain to every 
clear-thinking mind, as clear as the noonday's 
sun on a bright June 21, that there can be no 
free speech without free assembly. 

Now that you have the premises, let us de- 
velop just one other observation and then pro- 
ceed to our conclusion. 

The Dark Injunction History. 
For the last forty years the labor injunction 
has been the workman's bane, the nation's curse. 
For forty years injunctions have been used to 
destroy, to trample upon the rights of Labor, 
to crush its ambitions, to slay it. For forty 
years the courts have been crowded with their 
pleadings, the jails tilled with their alleged 
violators, and for forty years they have sapped 
at the vitals of Labor, and have cost it 
millions in men and money. But organized 
labor, militant of spirit, looking upward, tighting 
onward, has fought and fought in every court 
until to-day, the highest court of this land and 
every respectable State court has announced in 
words of plenty with reason of sufficiency that 
the right of peaceful picketing and moral 
suasion, as contradistinguished from violence, 
intimidation, and coercion, will be allowed and 
upheld; that he who commits violence or at- 
tempts it, who resorts to coercion or intimida- 
tion, docs not indulge in peaceful picketing or 
moral suasion; that the violators of the law, the 
perpetrators of violence, intimidation, and picket- 
ing will be punished, but that peaceful picketing 
and moral suasion will, nevertheless, be upheld. 
Now, when at least one hundred decisions have 
been handed down to that effect, you would 
imagine that that would be enough; that when 
Labor has sweated and taxed itself to its 
capacity to pay the gentlemen of the legal 
profession to have the courts reiterate, time 
and again, those natural, fundamental, human 
precepts, that that would suffice for all time, 
and that Labor might now, in this year, A. D. 
1916, go on with some other phase of human 
oppression and proceed to right another and 
different wrong. 

The Accommodating Judge. 
But no, in spite of all the gains that Labor 
has made, there is found in every industrial 
community some judge before whom capital will 
go and to whom the haters of organized labor 
and its cause will turn for an injunction in case 
of a strike or lockout — an accommodating judge 
who, with anarchistic spirit, in violation of the 
law, and in direct violation of the constitutional 
rights of free speech, free press, and free as- 
sembly, will deliver himself of a decision and 
hand down an injunction whereby he denies the 
rights of peaceful picketing and moral suasion — 
these rights which are so sacred and so safe- 
guarded by the Constitution that not even in 
case of rebellion or invasion may they be 
suspended. 

Why should a judge, in the face of all those 
decisions, in the face of the plain constitutional 
inhibitions, do that? Let me pause and tell you. 
Take away peaceful picketing and moral suasion, 
and you take away Labor's only two legal 
weapons. Take away peaceful picketing and 
moral suasion, and you tie Labor's hands. Take 
away peaceful picketing and moral suasion, and 
you help to break the strike, and he who 
takes them away, or endeavors to do so, whether 
by law or any other means, whether by criminal 
prosecutions or injunctions, is a strikebreaker, 
and why a judge should take them away in the 
face of all the numerous decisions which have 
now so thoroughly made plain these constitu- 
tional provisions and entrenched those very 
rights of Labor, spells a motive so flagrant that 
it at once and without debate stamps him as 
unfit for judicial duty. 

Appeal No Real Remedy. 
Ah, but you say, and they tell you that the 
remedy for such an injunction, the violation of 
such constitutional rights, is by appeal. Oh, 
shades of the law's delay! A temporary in- 
junction is usually in effect a final decree, for 
while Labor has appealed from hundreds of such 
temporary injunctions, such interlocutory de- 
cisions, time and again, the period consumed 
between the entry of the temporary injunction 
and the entry of the final decree is so great 
that the strike often is ended and the dastardly 
work has been accomplished. The time be- 
tween the entry of the temporary injunction and 
the hearing of its review upon appeal is usually 
so long that the higher court's decision becomes 
of academic value merely. In fact, the rules of 
some States won't even permit an appeal from 
a temporary injunction, or else make the grant- 
ing of it a matter of such judicial discretion, so 
observed by all courts that a remedy by appeal 
becomes inefficacious and nugatory and in ef- 
fect denies an appeal. 

Violate an injunction, and you are promptly 
sent to jail for contempt of court. Exercise your 
constitutional rights of free speech, free press, 
and free assembly — which are nothing more than 



peaceful picketing and moral suasion — when the 
injunction says "thou shalt not," and you will lie 
moldering in jail; and when you protest against 
the enforcement of such injunction denying 
these constitutional rights to you, and assert 
that the injunction is wrong, that it takes from 
you the right of free speech, free press, and 
free assembly, the answer promptly is that your 
remedy is not by violation, but by appeal. So, in 
effect, your rights are denied, while capital pro- 
ceeds to deal out its blows to Labor. 

The Two Methods Open to Labor. 

Now, then, what shall be done? There are 
two methods open to Labor of dealing with such 
a judge. 

The one is a course heretofore followed but 
weakly, and that is to endeavor to beat the 
judge when he is up for re-election. Sometimes 
Labor has succeeded at the task. Often it has 
failed, but Labor must never forget such a 
judge and must exert itself, strenuous as it may 
be, to defeat at the polls such judge for re- 
election. It must insist that his opponent shall 
run upon a platform of Americanism — the 
highest form of Americanism, the guarantee of 
the constitutional rights of free speech, free 
press, and free assembly, and to organized labor, 
peaceful picketing and moral suasion. 

Often, however, between the entry of such an 
injunction and the time of the judge's re-election, 
too great a period has elapsed so that the ill 
effect of his decision has been forgotten and 
again he goes to his bench by Labor's default. 
In the interim, therefore, work for legislation in 
direction of constitutional amendment permitting 
the recall of judges. 

Then, second, there is another remedy, a 
remedy guaranteed by the Constitution, a remedy 
heretofore sparingly exercised but one which, if 
invoked, can be made speedy and effective, to 
wit, the impeachment of such a judge. 

Let Labor exercise its right in each instance 
where a judge deliberately, wilfully, and in 
violation of precedents so numerous, out of 
what motive we care not, proceeds with care to 
serve the interests of capital by denying to 
Labor its constitutional rights — the rights of 
free speech, free press, free assembly, to wit, 
peaceful picketing and moral suasion — to im- 
peach or make attempt at his impeachment. 

Labor must no longer endure or submit to 
such injuries being heaped upon it. 

Survive or Perish — Live or Die. 

Such judges must be removed. The Con- 
stitution of the United States and the Constitu- 
tion of your State call upon you in their de- 
fense. "Survive or perish" — "Live or die"; which 
shall it be — Organized labor or the unfit judge? 
Countless millions of workingmen, women, and 
children look to organized labor, with the aid of 
their guaranteed constitutional rights, to take the 
oppressing employers off their bending backs. 

Organized labor must have, it shall have, and 
will have and all that dwell on American soil, 
untrampled, the constitutional rights of free 
speech, free press and free assembly, expressed 
to them in terms of moral suasion and peaceful 
picketing. 

Call your organization to colors! Muster into 
service all your rank and file. Prefer charges 
of impeachment against every such law-breaking 
judge. — W. B. Rubin, in the American Feder- 
ationist. 



COLOR IN THE DEEP SEA. 



Striking into the middle of one of John 
C. Van Dyke's studies of natural appear- 
ances, we find him discussing the color- 
ing of the deep sea. "However the bot- 
tom may change the local color in shal- 
low waters, it has little or no effect upon 
the great seas. Their coloring is produced 
largely by particles of salt and other mat 
ter held in the water. It is doubtless the 
salt-particles in sea water having the power 
of reflecting blue that make the Mediter 
ranean such a dark ultra-marine ; and the 
rock-particles carried down from the Alps 
by the Rhone make the water of that 
stream assume a beautiful blue tone even 
when the reflecting blue sky is shut out 
by clouds. Again, the effect of the Blue 
Grotto, near Capri, is produced by light 
shining through the water from beneath 
and striking particles that apparently turn 
to blue and produce that tone through- 
out the cave. 

"Certain particles or floating matters — 
animal, vegetable or mineral, I know not 
which — make the Gulf Stream an indigo 
current traveling through a lighter body 
of water, make the Gulf of Lyons a darker 
blue than the sky above it, and make the 
Gulf of Gascony a dark green. Reference- 



is now being made solely to local color and 
not to sky reflection of any kind. For if 
these waters be taken up in white jars 
the difference in hue will still be well 
marked. It is inherent in the water, a 
part of it, just as the Yellow Sea is yellow 
because of vegetable deposits, and the 
Xorth Sea off Scheveningen is yellow 
brown from carrying in it a solution of 
earth matter. 

"Aside from the coloring matter, the 
hue of ocean water is sometimes changed 
in spots by the presence of great swarms 
of animalculae, or patches of algae, or 'sea- 
sawdust.' The spots and areas of white, 
red and brown that look so picturesque 
upon the surfaces of the Indian and Pacific 
oceans, and occasionally in the Arctic seas 
are accounted for in this way. Hut these 
are mere patches of surface color in iso- 
lated regions. The general hue of sea- 
water is controlled largely by the matter 
of sea depth. It requires a great mass of 
air particles to make a blue sky, and it 
takes a great depth of sea-water and much 
reflection from salt particles to produce 
the deep-blue sea. It is safe to say, then, 
that the greatest depths are the bluest, 
that the shallower depths incline to green, 
and the shallowest waters — the waters near 
shore — are the ones that show the browns. 
reds, or yellows. 

"All these colors are peculiarly beau- 
tiful for a reason we seldom take into 
consideration — namely, their transparency. 
The ordinary colors of nature as shown 
in grass, flowers, trees, fields, mountains, 
are opaque. The hue is on the surface, 
and is only a veneer — an outer coating — 
so far as our eyes are concerned. But the 
sky in its interminable height and the sea 
in its vast depth are Mite by virtue of 
superimposed layers or strata of trans- 
parent substances. It is not until stratum 
has been heaped upon stratum in countless 
numbers that the color begins to show. 
ee into them as into open space, the 
quality of the color breaks upon us slowly, 
and its greatest tenderness is revealed to 
us only in its profoundest depths." 



THEN AND NOW. 



< >ver 100 years ago John Adams called 
attention to the fact that there was little 
difference between the man who worked 
for wages that he must spend for the 
necessities of life and the chattel slave 
who received no wages and had his neces- 
sities supplied by his master. The real 
truth is that the average wage worker is 
economically no better off than the black- 
mail was under slavery, and it is no mis- 
nomer to call him a wage slave. 'When 
the black slave was sick he was well cared 
for because he was a piece of valuable- 
property. When he was too old to work 
he was as well fed as those who worked. 
When the wage slave gets sick his wages 
stop and if he has managed to save noth- 
ing from his wages he goes hungry; when 
he is too old to work he becomes an object 
of charity, he is not valuable property. His 
death is no loss to the masters. The wage 
slave has but one advantage over the 
chattel slave — he has a vote and he can 
vote himself out of slavery whenever he 
gets sense enough to do it. — Quarry 
Worker. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Bread Has Too Much Water. 

In the House of Representatives, while 
urging the passage of his bill which would 
permit the mixing of corn flour and wheat 
flour, Congressman Rainey, of Illinois, 
said : 

"One reason for the opposition of the 
great commercial bakers to a loaf of bread 
made out of mixed flour is this : The loaf 
will be an honest loaf and it will be im- 
possible for it to carry as much moisture 
as a loaf made entirely out of wheat flour. 
I have in my possession a number of 
clippings made from milling papers, some 
of them being made from the Northwest- 
ern Miller, one of the principal organs of 
the food trust, others being made from the 
trade papers which reach bakers." 

The advertisements state that the various 
flours "have great water absorption," could 
"absorb large quantities of water," can 
"use more water," etc., etc. 

Congressman Rainey said he purchased 
five 5-cent loaves of bread of different 
brands at a Washington market. Each 
weighed 13 ounces. The next day they 
weighed 12 ounces and the following day 
another ounce of water had been absorbed. 
He charged the large elevators with mix- 
ing No. 1 wheat with rejected and no- 
grade wheat, and cited statistics of Duluth 
elevators to prove his point. In one year 
these elevators received 15,000,000 bushels 
of No. 1 northern wheat and shipped out 
19,000,000 bushels of the same kind of 
wheat. In the same year they took in 19,- 
000,000 bushels of No. 2 northern wheat 
and shipped out only 15,000,000 bushels of 
the same grade. 

"By the method in vogue of grading 
wheat at the elevators," he said, "wheat 
farmers are robbed and the food trust 
reaps enormous profits, and yet the same 
interests which mix wheat of different 
grades or of no grade in the same elevators 
of the country are opposed, all of them, 
to the mixed-flour bill, which would permit 
the sale on the market of perfectly pure 
corn flour and perfectly pure wheat flour 
combined." 



Illegal to Feed Strikers. 

At the convention of the Trades and 
Labor Congress of Canada, to be held in 
Toronto, September 25 to 30, changes in 
the industrial disputes act will be consid- 
ered. This law prohibits strikes and lock- 
outs in public utilities until 30 days' notice 
has been given the government. 

It is intended to annul court decisions 
that debar victimized workers from relief. 
In the case of Montreal street car em- 
ployees who were dismissed by the com- 
pany, the Quebec superior court ruled that 
these workers could not ask the govern- 
ment to appoint a commission to investi- 
gate their case. 

A vicious decision was made in Nova 
Scotia where workmen struck before a 
board was called in and were later fur- 
nished food paid for out of the funds of 
the union. One of the union officials was 
heavily fined for "encouraging the men to 
stay on strike," and Chief Justice Town- 
shend declared that "it is difficult to con- 



ceive any more efficient means of aiding 
strikes than those found in the present 
case. It is, of course, precisely the aid 
wanted to enable strikers to live during 
the pendency of the strike." 

Regarding this decision, J. G. O'Don- 
oghue, attorney for the Trades and Labor 
Congress, said : 

"In other words, the court's view was 
that the strikers should have been allowed 
to die of starvation. If the strikers had 
been in jail, the court would probably 
have disciplined the jailer for allowing 
them fresh air- — another means of allowing 
them to live. Shades of British justice !" 

Minister of Labor Crothers has also pre- 
pared amendments to the present law, and 
in his analysis of these, Attorney O'Don- 
oghue says : 

"The more I consider the act and its 
suggestions, the more I am of the opinion 
that the intent of the draftsman was to 
choke organized labor to death." 



Oppose Mexican Intervention. 

The Mexican Property Owners' Non- 
intervention League has been formed in 
San Francisco by Americans who have 
large property interests in the southern 
republic. 

"We favor," says the declaration of prin- 
ciples, "action by the United States that 
will tend towards the rehabilitation of 
Mexico on lines that shall be mutually 
agreed upon, and that every effort shall 
be taken for complete cooperation in as- 
sisting in this rehabilitation. 

"It shall also be the object of this or- 
ganization to give publicity to the actual 
facts as to the conditions as they exist 
in Mexico, in order that the American pub- 
lic may be convinced that intervention by 
force would be no less than a crime, and 
that such intervention has not heretofore 
been necessary or required, and certainly 
is not necessary at the present time." 



Newspaper Printer Doomed. 

The newspaper printer is doomed and 
joys reigns in the camp of every advocate 
of "scientific management." The printer- 
man must make way for chimpanzees. 

Writing in the Typographical Journal 
from Honolulu, A. B. H. Cole tells the 
story of Biz Fox, a chimpanzee linotype 
operator, who composed 101,000 ems solid 
brevier in eight hours and forty-five min- 
utes. The chimpanzee has other accom- 
plishments besides being a "swift." He is 
a champion bicycle rider and has been 
arrested by traffic policemen. It is stated 
that a company is being formed to supply 
newspapers with chimpanzee operators. 
About the only drawback to this arrange- 
ment is the question of morals. The or- 
ganized printerman does not get drunk, 
but his rival is an excessive patron of the 
flowing bowl. That newspapers may be 
published regularly, Correspondent Cole 
says the company will remedy this evil by 
crossing the chimpanzee with the white- 
faced monkey of China and make him a 
temperance advocate. 

Under the new conditions employers will 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
l.eiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinhciros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road. 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's WorKers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Building operations are at a stand- 
still in Argentina on account of 
the cost of lumber in the United 
States, which is double that before 
the war, and the freights for it, 
when a ship can be chartered, are 
five times higher. All other building 
materials have risen equally in price, 
Fifty-one of the German ships 
seized by Portugal last spring will be 
turned over to the British govern- 
ment for commercial use, according 
to a dispatch from Lisbon. No 
announcement is made as to the 
names of the vessels to be trans- 
ferred, but it is believed that the 
largest of the requisitioned ships arc 
concerned in the transaction. 

A committee representing Canadian 
Pacific railroad shop men has se- 
cured an agreement with that com- 
pany which provides for the follow- 
ing increases per hour in Winnipeg: 
Boilermakers, 3 cents; boilermakers* 
helpers, \ l /> cents; machinists, black- 
smiths, iron molders and sheet metal 
workers, 2 l / 2 cents, and 2 cents per 
hour for litters, pipe fitters, bench 
carpenters, coach and locomotive car- 
penters, blacksmiths' helpers, elec- 
tricians and painters. The agreement 
is to continue until April 30, 1917. 
After this date the agreement shall 
continue, if satisfactory to both sides, 
but a thirty days' notice is neces- 
sary for changes. 

The President of the British Board 
of Trade, on being asked in the 
House of Commons whether he was 
aware that dissatisfaction was being 
caused among British seamen by the 
increasing employment of Chinese 
ir in British ships, and that 
British seamen, including the 40,000 
with the colors, believed that their 
economic position both now and 
after the war was being gravely 
prejudiced and imperiled by this de- 
velopment; and what action he pro- 
posed to take, replied: "I am aware 
that some dissatisfaction has been 
caused among British seamen by the 
increasing employment of Chinese 
u'li in British ships, which is 
largely due to the present shortage 
nf British seamen available for em- 
ployment. As regards the last part 
of the question, I can only say that 
the point raised will receive serious 
attention." 

The Berliner Tageblatt has drawn 
attention to a proclamation that has 
just been issued by the Landrat in 
Insterburg, and which ran as fol- 
lows: "Even nowadays it still fre- 
quently happens that landowners in 
the district who have applied for 
laborers to be allotted them, have 
sent back German soldiers because 
they prefer Russian prisoners. I 
hereby publicly announce that land- 
owners who reject the help of Ger- 
man soldiers need not reckon upon 
having prisoners allotted them 
either." That such a proclamation 
should have been necessary at all, 
observed the Tageblatt, is highly re- 
grettable, but it shows very clearly 
how little the landowners concerned 
arc mindful of their patriotic duty. 
However desirable it may seem to 
make a moderate use of the nu- 
merous prisoners of war in their 
former professions, they cannot be 
allowed, of course, to crowd out 
German labor. That applies, general- 
ly speaking to every German work- 
man, but it naturally applies doubly 
to the members of the German 
army whom every East Prussian 
landowner especially has to thank for 
the liberation of the land from the 
Russian invasion. 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON STREETS .... SAN PEDRO 



San Pedro Letter List. 



PHONE 187 J 



HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 

NATIONAL HOTEL 

MRS. ALBERT H. RYAN, Prop. 

FURNISHED ROOMS 
50c Per Day and Up — $2 Per Week and Up 
No. 270 FOURTH STREET SAN PEDRO, 



CAL. 



REMOVAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 

S. G. SWANSON the BEST hsTn* TAILORING Fancy h prlce 

who has been established since 1904 on Beacon Street, between 6th and 7th 

IS NOW located on the 2nd floor BANK OF SAN PEDRO BLDG., 
entrance 110 WEST 6th STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL., 

Where he is better prepared, because of Much lesser rent, to give the trade the 
advantage of lower prices and as formerly, special care is given to garments en- 
trusted to him for Cleaning, Repairing and Pressing. 

Note — Clothes also cut, trimmed and made from your own cloth with the 
Union Label too. The new woolens are now ready for your inspection, how about 
your order? 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



Mills, Elbert ® Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 
FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers in — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 



San Franciic*. 



Bergman, John Johnsen, Aug. 

Blom, Ernest Konig, D. 

Christiansen, Anton Nielsen, Harold 

Christiansen, A. Olander, Ed 

Doris. Geo. Thomson, John 
Eckart, T. G. 



A SAILOR'S BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA- FARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, the bank 

carries on hand at all times an ample supply of Swedish, Norwegian 

and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Edstrom, alias Brynjulf Ed- 
strom, born in Norway in 1879, was 
last heard from at Mobile, Ala., 
where his address was Norwegian 
Chapell, is inquired for. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify his mother. Address, 22 Pile- 
stradet, Kristiania, Norway. — 12-22-15 

George Alexander Sharman, a na- 
tive of Brooklyn, N. Y. About 28 
years of age, height S feet 9 inches, 



supposed to have sailed on the Great 
Lakes in 1907, is inquired for by 
M. L. Kinvan, 1211 Mosher street, 
Baltimore, Md. 7-14-15 

George Barrett, who, on November 
12, 1912, left the ship "Port Logan" 
at Newcastle, of which he was an 
apprentice, is inquired for by his 
mother, his father having died. Any- 
one knowing the whereabouts of this 
lost son please at once communi- 
cate with Amelia Barrett, 1 Wood- 
land Place, East Greenwich, Lon- 
don, England. 3-3-15 



Acne, T. 
Andersen, John 

Bergman, Leo 
Button. Roswi 11 

C. 

Hans 
Bro, Emil 
Bentsen, Hans B. 
Bushman, John 

H. 
Christophersen, C. 
u, Harry 

i. Ghistaf 

William 
Dahlstrom, G. 
Edlund, Konrad 
Franke, Chas. 
I' Mil man. Jonas 

Thor 
Fjellman, Karl 
Guseck, Bernhard 
Ginar, 'Walter 

H, E. 

urg, Martin 
Hodman. John M. 
Horlin, Ernest 
Henrleksen, H. C. 
Hedlund, Olaf 

• ■. Tlcnry 

rom, Fritz 
Haupt. Fritz 

i. Charley 
Hansen. Ole 
Hoversen, Carl 
Jacobsen, Tars 
ison, John 
Johnson, Jack 
Janson, Oscar 



Mirharlson. Andrew 
Maurice. Francois 
Muller. Henry 
McNeal, John 
Makela, N. 
Malm, Gustaf 
Nilsen, Nils E. 
Nilsen, Oskar 
Nilsen, Oskar J. 
Olsen, J. P. 
Orling, Gust 
Owen, Fred 
Pedersen. Alt 
Pelz, Fritz 
Petrow, A. 
Peterson. H. -1064 
Pintz, Johan 
Peterson, Hugo 
Petterson, C. V. 
Pakki, Emil 
Pederson, Ole 
iiiikman, Herman 

n. Oskar 
Roe, Victor 
Robertson, A. 
Rush, Charlie 
Rlea, .1. H. 
Rami. Einar 
Rudd, Walter 
Skaanes, I 
Sjoblom, G. A. 

-iir Th. 
Stenberg, Alfred 

en, S. N. 
Simpson, L. C. 

on, Frank 
Smith .Inhan 

md, Anton 
I ouritz P. 



Johnsaon, J. A. -1659Strom. C. L. 
Johaneon, Victor £ K.mrad 

Kluff. N. 'Hi.. 

Kallas, M. Tennlsen, Andrew 

Kolodzie, George T'llman. Axel 
Knrnup, Edward Uhlig, Richard 

Kallio, Anton Ulappa, Kostl 

Lundquist, Abraham Welsen, Julius (Reg. 
Laatzen, IT. Lett 

T.indeman. Gust Wlschkar, Ernst 

Lorenz, Bruno Wikman. P. 

Lutzen. Waldemar White. Robert 



Larson. Max 

lerg, Ernst 
leer, Elith 

Martin, John B. 



Warkkala. John 
Newspapers and 
Packages. 
Schmidt. Lauritz P. 



Honolulu, H. T. 

Anderson, John E. Nelsen. C. F. 

Burk, Harry -1284 Petersen. Carl 

Crantly, C. W. Peters, Walter 

Eugenio. John Reither, Fritz 

ICkelund, Rickhard Solberg, B. P. 

Ivertsen, Sigvald B. Strand, Conrad 

Eengwenus, W. L. Thompson, Emil N. 
Moller. F. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Carl Fritjof Johansson Lind, age 
39, a native of Sonderborg, Germany, 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify John Lind, 1401 West 9th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 3-24-15 

Anders C. Anderson, a native of 
Norway, who left his personal effects 
at Port San Luis, Cal., after leaving 
a ship at that place, is inquired for. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify D. R. Jacks, Deputy 
Collector of Customs, Port San Luis, 
Cal. 12-22-15 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July, 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St. 8-11-15 

Olai Ingebrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Niels Ingebrigtsen, 
469— 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 8-4-15 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Peter Murphy, better known as 
Boatswain McGann, will kindly notify 
Patrick Kieran, 58 Commercial St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 4-19-16 

Vencclus Durbich is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please communicate with 
Gerolamo Durbich, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 7-28-15 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen' Journal 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Two refrigerated cargo-carriers are now under 
construction to the order of the Union Steam- 
ship Company of New Zealand. One is being 
built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, 
the other by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co., and when 
completed it is the intention of the company to 
place them in the Australia-Pacific Coast trade. 

Work on the two new motor-ships being 
built for Swayne & Hoyt of San Francisco at 
Grays Harbor by the Grays Harbor Shipbuild- 
ing Company is being rushed, and the first ves- 
sel will take her initial bath in October and 
the second in December. The first ship is now 
about 60 per cent, complete and the second 40 
per cent. Both vessels will have a carrying 
capacity of 2,100,000 feet of lumber. 

The steamer "Republic," formerly the German 
steamer "Walkure," owned by the Guggenheim 
interests, has been chartered by the American 
Smelter Steamship Company to carry lumber 
from the Columbia River to South America. 
The "Republic" has left for the Columbia River, 
where she will take on a cargo. About 3,000,000 
feet will be put aboard the steamer and it will 
be unloaded at Antofogasta and Valparaiso. 

The United States . Commissioner of Naviga- 
tion has granted permission to change the name 
of the steamer "John A. Hooper" to "Santa 
Alicia" The steamer was purchased by W. R. 
Grace & Co. from Sudden & Christenson about 
two months ago and she is now being used in 
the Gulf of Mexico trade. She was built at 
Wilmington, Del., in 1912, and has a gross 
tonnage of 2240. 

Unable to get any aid from the British Colum- 
bia government on fishing rules and propaga- 
tion of salmon, in order to prevent the ex- 
tinction of the sockeye salmon, Washington 
Fish Commissioner Darwin has filed a petition 
with the United States fisheries bureau at Wash- 
ington, D-. C, for a consignment of 40,000,000 
Alaska red salmon eggs from the Federal hatch- 
erics in Alaska. If available, 80,000,000 eggs 
will be cheerfully- accepted. 

In the twelve months ending July 31, 45,311,- 
692 passengers were carried on the ferryboats, 
according to the annual report of Inspectors of 
Steamboats James Guthrie and Joseph Dolan, 
which has just been issued. There was not one 
passenger seriously injured by accidents on the 
ferryboats during the year. The number of 
passengers carried by the different companies 
are:- Southern Pacific, 23,334,904; Key Route, 
15,377,032; Northwestern Pacific, 6,156,369; Santa 
Fe, 307,684, and Western Pacific, 135,703. 

W. R. Grace & Co., have placed a contract 
with the Matthews Shipbuilding Company, of 
Hoquiam, Wash., to build two motor vessels to 
be equipped with two auxiliary engines, driving 
twin screws, each of 320 B. H. P. . The vessels 
will be 225 feet over all, 42;^ feet beam and 15 
feet deep, with a shelter deck 9 feet in the clear. 
These vessels, which will be ready, early next 
year, are to be used in the South American 
trade. The hulls will be built at Hoquiam and 
will then lie towed to San Francisco to have 
the engines installed. 

The Todd Shipyards Corporation, the holding 
company controlling the Robins Dry Dock, 
Tietjen & Lang and Seattle Dry Dock Company, 
has declared an initial quarterly dividend of 
$1.75 a share, payable September 30 to stock of 
record September 20. There are 85,500 shares 
outstanding of no par value Net earnings for 
the quarter ending: August 31 are estimated to 
be in excess of $750,000, after providing for all 
interest and sinking fund payments, including 
the interest and sinking fund on the five-year 
6 per cent, notes. 

The salvage crews at the scene of the stranded 
steamship "Bear" are taking advantage of the 
favorable tides which prevail during the early 
part of this month, and every dav at high water 
a pull is taken on the vessel by the wrecker 
"Salvor," lying off in deep water. In the 
meantime the sand pumps aboard the vessel 
and on the beach, together with the steam drag 
shovel operated from the beach, are kept busv 
drcderinGf the sand from about the vessel, while 
the bull donkey ashore keeps up a strain on 
her, and the anchor to seaward assists in hold- 
ing her up. 

The price of fuel oil sold to steamships at the 
canal ports by the Panama Canal will be in- 
creased to $1.75 per barrel at Balboa and $2 per 
barrel at Cristobal, effective October 1, 1916. 
This is an increase of 35 cents per barrel at 
both terminals, the current prices being $1.40 at 
Balboa and $1.65 at Cristobal. This will be the 
second advance this year, as prior to May 1 the 
price was $1.25 per barrel at either terminal. 
Diesel oil is not sold bv the Panama Canal at 
this tinie, but. is for sale at both terminals bj 
the corporations which have erected tanks on 
the farms. 

United States mail for the Orient will be 
carried by Army transports hereafter, in order 
to avoid the British censorship at Vancouver, 
B, ('., according to advices received by Posl 
master Fay from Washington. This move by 
the Postoffice Department was made after re- 
ceiving vigorous protests from San Francisco 
and Seattle merchants who asserted that their 



mail had been scanned and their Oriental busi- 
ness all but wiped out as a result. It is 
charged that the British censorship was so wide- 
spread that United States mail for the Philip- 
pines was tampered with. 

Changes in the higher officials of the Pacific 
Alaska Navigation Company as a result of the 
acquisition of the turbiners "Yale" and "Har- 
vard" were announced during the week by Pres- 
ident H. F. Alexander. A. F. Haines, for ten 
years in charge of Dodwell & Co., Limited, 
operating the Blue Funnel line, and manager and 
treasurer of the Border Line Transportation 
Company and the Dodwell Dock and Warehouse 
Company, has been appointed manager of the 
Pacific Alaska Navigation Company with head- 
quarters at Seattle. R. J. Ringwood, manager 
of the Admiral line at San Francisco, has been 
promoted to vice-president with headquarters 
at San Francisco. 

The hulk of the steamer "Victorian," at one 
time the finest passenger craft plying on Puget 
Sound, will be dismantled and burned. The 
vessel was built in 1891 in Portland for the 
O. R. & N. Co., under the supervision of Cap- 
tain J. W. Troop, now manager of coast steam- 
ship service of the Canadian Pacific Railway 
Company. Her first service was as a passenger 
boat between Tacoma, Seattle and Victoria, B. 
C. She could develop close to twenty-one knots 
and during the Klondike rush in 1898, she made 
several voyages to Alaska. On January 13, 1910, 
she was sold at Seattle by the United States 
marshal to satisfy libels and court costs amount- 
ing to $26,000, for $11,300 to Hall Brothers, who 
had a claim of $13,000 against her. 

What will be the fastest boat on San Fran- 
cisco Bay when completed was launched during 
the week at Kneass shipyards in South San 
Francisco. The speedboat was built for the 
Union Iron Works. The length of the new craft 
is forty feet and she has a beam of six feet 
seven inches. It is planned to use the speeder 
between the Union Iron Works on this side of 
the bay and the Alameda plant of the works in 
carrying dispatches and small tools. The neces- 
sity for such a craft has been constantly in- 
creasing since the Union Iron Works purchased 
the Moore & Scott plant. The power for the 
motorboat will be furnished by an eight-cylinder 
220-horsepower Van Blcrk engine, which was 
built in Monroe, Mich. It is expected that a 
speed of more than thirty miles a hour will be 
attained. 

The steam-schooner "Bandon," which went 
ashore September 1 near Port Orford while 
bound from San Francisco to Bandon, Or., be- 
lieved a total loss, may yet be saved, according 
to a dispatch received from Captain . Curtiss, 
marine surveyor. P-evious attempts to get the 
"Bandon" free have been unsuccessful, holes in 
her hull having filled her full of water. Re- 
cently the steamer Acme was sent with Captain 
Curtiss to see what could be done. Captain 
Curtiss reported that the "Bandon," on Sep- 
tember 9, had been moved astern about four 
feet. It is expected, according to Curtiss, that 
the vessel would be moved fully forty feet at 
the next favorable tide. This "length will move 
the. vessel so as to get her bow past the rock 
which is holding her and will enable the swing- 
ing of the "Bandon" out into deep water. 

The naturalist of the "Albatross" has sub- 
mitted to the United States Bureau of Fisheries 
a preliminary report of observations made in 
July to determine the effect of kelp harvesting 
upon fishes. The observations were made be- 
tween Point Loma and La Jolla, in the vicinity 
of San Diego, Cal. Evidence of the presence 
of fish eggs on the kelp was sought. In the 
case of harvesters that grind the kelp as it is 
cut, such evidence, of course, is not available; 
but some harvesters do not grind the kelp 
while cutting it, and in such cases the oppor- 
tunity was afforded for making the desired ob- 
servations. No evidence of eggs, fish, or craw- 
fish larvae could be found. On the kelp beds 
the leaves were examined to a depth of 8 or 10 
feet, and the specimens of mollusks, crustaceans, 
worms, hydroids, etc., collected. Some small 
fish were taken, but these were not the young 
of food fishes, since they were mature at 1 inch 
in length. No fish eggs could be found. Al- 
though three harvesters had been working on 
this bed for more than three months, the 
amount of kelp at the surface of the water had 
not decreased appreciably. It is said that if 
the harvesters begin at one side of the kelp beds 
and cut clean as they go, the first part will 
have grown up again to its natural condition 
before the whole bed has been passed over. 
While the preliminary observations in this re- 
gion afforded no ground for suspecting that the 
harvesting of kelp is injurious to important fish 
or shellfish, the bureau plans to continue the 
investigation. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. Tie gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md WALTER LESCH, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY GUSTAV H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street and 427 West Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

41 Loyalls Lane 

NEWPORT, Va MONS MONSEN, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 
MOBILE, Ala. 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La DAVID F. PERRY Agent 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WILLY MULLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 
Broad. 
New York Branch, 514 Greenwich St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 228 Lafayette St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON, Mass., iy 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 231 Dock St. 
NEW YORK CITY, 164 Eleventh Ave. 
BALTIMORE. Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW York CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 202 Atlantio Ave. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 328-332 West Randolph St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y„ 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y„ 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR. Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 365. 

Branches: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North TonawRnda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BT THE 

SAILOR'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL, SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE 

One year by mall - $2.00 | Six months J1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
Maritime Building, 59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the JOURNAL, provided they are of general 
Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only of 
the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1916. 



PACIFIC MAIL FINANCES. 



Considerable light has been thrown, of 
late, upon the inner workings of the Pacific 
Mail Steamship Company, and some very 
curious transactions have been uncovered. 

It has been stated and published repeat- 
edly that American ships were driven off 
the Pacific ; that the Seamen's law was 
ruinous to American shipping; that our 
navigation laws would have to be changed 
before we could expect ships to take and 
continue American registry. As a horrible 
example, we are warned, "Look what hap- 
pened to the Pacific Mail \" 

Senator Fletcher, of Florida, in the 
course of a recent address took up this oft 
repeated query, held it in the limelight and 
said : "Let us see what has actually hap- 
pened.') 

The Senator then briefly explained that 
the Pacific Mail did sell the following 
steamers: The "Siberia," 11,284 gross tons; 
the "Korea," 11,276 gross tons; the "Man- 
churia," 11,638 gross tons; and the "Mon- 
golia," 11,638 gross tons. These steamers 
were formerly engaged in trade between 
San Francisco and Asia. They were not 
sold to foreign buyers. They did not 
change their flag. They were simply trans- 
ferred to the Atlantic coast, and to a trade 
where freight rates were higher and their 
earnings could be increased. They con- 
tinued to operate under the same laws as 
they did when owned by the Pacific Mail. 

Now, the Pacific Mail, realizing its mis- 
take, has purchased three liners from the 
Royal Dutch West India Mail Company at 
$1,100,000 each, and has resumed its trans- 
pacific service, which it suddenly and with- 
out any regard whatever to the interests of 
its patrons abandoned. It alleges that it 
has decided to reverse its policy because 
"the gigantic leaps in freight rates have 
rendered it possible to operate at a profit 
in spite of the injurious effects of the Sea- 
men's law." 

This, said Senator Fletcher, is as false 
as the reason they gave when they quit 
their transpacific service, namely, that "the 



Seamen's law made it impossible for them 
to operate profitably." 

Of course, the falsity of this excuse or 
claim is proved not only by the resumption 
of their transpacific sailings but by the fact 
that the poorest and least profitable ship 
in the former fleet of the Pacific Mail, the 
steamship "China," was taken over by a small, 
newly organized company, which, notwith- 
standing the greatly increased cost of oper- 
ating only one ship, has continued the 
"China" in the transpacific service, under 
the American flag, with great profit. And 
it is reported that the new owners paid 
for the "China" with the profits from the 
first two voyages in the same service which 
the Pacific Mail had abandoned. Senator 
Fletcher therefore made the following de- 
ductions: 

All the circumstances tend to show, and those 
in position to know assert, that the Pacific Mail 
discontinued their transpacific service at a time 
when they were able to sell their steamers for 
what they supposed were fancy figures, for no 
other reason than that it enabled the interests 
that controlled them to make very effective 
political capital of it; and they are now re- 
suming the service not because of high freight 
rates — transpacific freight rates are now actually 
lower than they were when the Pacific Mail dis- 
continued their sailings — but because of the Gov- 
ernment shipping bill, which is about to pass 
Congress, and their fear that as a result of this 
bill a line of Government ships would enter the 
trade they had abandoned. 

Certainly, it can no longer be denied that 
certain eminent financiers made some awful 
moves in the sale of the vessels above enu- 
merated. For the "Ecuador" and her two 
sister ships, which the new management of 
the Pacific Mail is now putting into the 
same trade, and for which they paid 
$1,100,000 each, are much inferior in every 
respect to the vessels formerly operated in 
this trade and which the old management 
foolishly sold for an average price of only 
$1,050,000 each. 

The new vessels have less than one- 
third the capacity of their former steamers 
"Mongolia" and "Manchuria," and they 
have less than one-half the capacity of their 
former steamers "Korea" and "Siberia," and 
they are rated at only 13 knots speed while 
the former vessels are rated at 18 knots. 

Senator Fletcher thinks "it will be sur- 
prising if the new boats can be profitably 
operated in this trade, because they are be- 
lieved to be much too small and slow for 
transpacific passenger steamers ; also, the 
Pacific Mail paid too high a price for them, 
about $200 a deadweight ton, and will con- 
sequently have to meet high charges for in- 
terest, insurance, and depreciation." Their 
former fleet, it will be recalled, was sold 
for less than $100 a ton. 

However, regardless of the company's 
success or failure under the new manage- 
ment, the American people no longer re- 
gard the Seamen's law as the great arch- 
criminal that has driven American ships off 
the Pacific. 



With this issue the Journal enters upon 
the thirtieth year of its life. This is the day, 
therefore, when we may be expected to "blow 
our own horn." But there is little need for 
any unseemly noise. The improvement in the 
economic condition of the American seaman 
during the past twenty-nine years, his changed 
status before the law from virtual slavery to 
freedom, tell their own eloquent tale. It has 
been the Journal's glorious privilege and 
principal mission to render aid and encour- 
agement in that noble cause. And after all, 
what greater reward, what larger degree of 
satisfaction can be obtained than the knowl- 
edge of having done one's duty well? 



LABOR AND THE WAR. 



Two national conventions of more than 
ordinary importance have just been held in 
England. 

The annual meeting of the General Feder- 
ation of Trade Unions met in Leeds, and 
the annual Trades Union Congress was held 
in Birmingham. 

In addition to these two meetings, an in- 
ternational syndical conference of the allied 
countries was held at Leeds under the presi- 
dency of James O'Grady, M. P. The dele- 
gates included Col. J. Ward, M. P., Ben Til- 
lett, Alexander Wilkie, M. P., and many other 
well-known Labor representatives. There 
were ten delegates from France, five from 
Italy, and two from Belgium. Delegates 
from Portugal and Russia were expected, but 
had not arrived when the conference ad- 
journed. The proceedings were conducted 
in private, but a resume of the discussions 
and decisions was supplied to the press by 
the secretary, W. A. Appleton. 

It was stated that since the outbreak of 
war there had been a definite attempt to neu- 
tralize both the personnel and the location 
of the International Trade Union movement. 
It was generally felt that the office should 
no longer remain in Berlin, nor should the 
management of the international organization 
be left in the hands of the German general 
commission. Considerable discussion took 
place as to the transference of headquarters, 
resulting in practically unanimous agreement 
that Geneva was the most suitable place, but 
the matter was left open for international 
consideration. 

Another matter discussed was a historical 
resume by the French of attempts which 
have been made to co-ordinate labor legisla- 
tion as between the nations. In this connec- 
tion, British delegates instanced the Saturday 
half -holiday, the eight-hour day, the protec- 
tion in regard to the work of women and 
children which existed to some extent in 
Great Britain, as being in advance of work- 
ing conditions on the continent of Europe. 
Nearly all the speakers were unanimous in 
the wish that efforts should be made to im- 
prove the conditions of labor everywhere, and 
it was arranged that M. Jouhaux of Paris, 
secretary of the French Federation of Trades 
Unions, should act as correspondent with the 
other countries on this matter. 

Detailed reports upon the two national 
labor conferences are not yet at hand. 

It appears, however, as if the majority of 
the British unions have now become recon- 
ciled to the military service act, but the 
plumbers and the railwaymen asked the Bir- 
mingham congress to express dissatisfaction 
with the action of the joint board in not call- 
ing a conference before the passing of the 
act, and the dockers regretted the exemption 
of the clergy from service. No less than 
five resolutions demanded the conscription of 
wealth, and with a view to such conscription 
the dockers requested the parliamentary com- 
mittee to press for a census of wealth. 

The proposal brought forward by the 
American Federation of Labor that repre- 
sentatives of organized labor of all countries 
should meet simultaneously with the diplo- 
matists who will discuss the terms of peace, 
in order to secure terms which would safe- 
guard labor, seems to have been rejected by 
all conferences of organized British workers. 

This is not surprising if the grossly im- 
proper and misleading remarks, credited in 
the newspapers to Wm. D. Mahon, one of 
the American fraternal delegates, created the 
impression that American workers "generally 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



sympathized" with one side in the European 
war. Delegate Mahon has evidently been too 
busy to read the American neutrality procla- 
mation. 

However that may be, it is just as certain 
as the night follows the day, that sooner or 
later the organized British workers will again 
have to do business with the organized Ger- 
man workers. Capital recognizes no bound- 
ary lines, but it has all too long been per- 
mitted to keep the workers divided against 
themselves by playing upon national and ra- 
cial hatreds. Surely, in the year 1916 this 
little earth of ours has become entirely too 
small for that sort of play. British working- 
men, too, must realize this, even though their 
Lords and Barons tell a different story. 

There would be small hope for the eman- 
cipation of the working class — in fact, there 
would scarcely be any hope at all — if it were 
really possible to permanently divide the toil- 
ers through bloody wars, instigated by those 
who occupy the totterings thrones of Europe. 



VOTES FOR WOMEN? 



Candidate Hughes has not had the nerve 
to urge the repeal of the Seamen's law. One 
of his "kept" campaign dodgers, however, is 
quite frank about it and boldly advocates the 
restoration of compulsory servitude upon 
American seamen. 

The dodger, said to be published by the 
Women's Committee of the National Hughes 
Alliance, also makes the following touching 
appeal for women's freedom : 

In States where women now have full or 
partial suffrage they remember the long, miser- 
able, humiliating struggle that led to their free- 
dom, and as each State grants to its women the 
right of franchise the same sorry spectacle is 
witnessed. 

Every woman with a vote, having tasted free- 
dom herself, has longed to help other women to 
the same privilege, and women have journeyed 
from State to State to speak in suffrage cam- 
paigns, to canvass from house to house for 
votes, and to assist at the polls on election days, 
etc., etc. 

Yes, it is grand, this "taste of freedom"! 

The toilers of the sea appreciate this fully. 

But do American women really want free- 
dom for themselves and slavery for others? 

The women of California never expressed 
themselves that way, but this Hughes cam- 
paign dodger leaves no one in doubt upon 
the issue. It is to be "votes for women" and 
"involuntary servitude for seamen." 

The editor of this paper has been a stanch 
advocate of woman suffrage and has never 
felt himself called upon to make apologies 
for his efforts in that direction. But this 
reactionary female (pardon our frankness) 
who edits the Hughes campaign literature 
has got to reform. She has got to concede 
freedom for men as well as for women ! 



President Ripley of the Santa Fe Railroad 
has publicly declared that he "will ignore" 
the new Federal eight-hour law for railroad 
workers. What a splendid opportunity for 
the "law and order" committee of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce to use a 
part of the million dollar slush fund for a 
righteous cause ! Will they tell Mr. Ripley 
that he, too, must obey the law ? Will they 
threaten him with dire consequences if he 
does not? Yes they will — when elephants 
lay eggs and whales climb trees ! 



Before adjourning, Congress authorized 
President Wilson to withhold clearance to 
foreign vessels which discriminate against or 
interfere with American trade. This is the 
first direct American challenge of the Allies' 
ruthless control of the seas. There ought to 
be some interesting developments soon ! 



A LEAGUE TO ENFORCE PEACE. 



Great International Movement to Prevent Need- 
less Wars Gives Preference to Organ- 
ized Labor. 



The League to Enforce Peace, with national 
headquarters at New York City, has just placed 
an order for 1,200,000 booklets setting forth the 
principles of the movement it conducts, an 
order requiring a carload of paper, with the 
Wynkoop, Hallenbeck Crawford Company, a 
union shop. The contract provides that the 
booklets shall bear the union label. 

An interesting feature of the series is a reprint 
of the notable address delivered by Samuel 
Gompers, President of the American Federation 
of Labor, at the first national assemblage of 
the League to Enforce Peace at Washington, 
May 26, 1916, on the interests of labor in the 
league. The effect of this address was to arouse 
to an extraordinary degree the interest of the 
working classes in the league's program; for, 
it will be remembered that the league proposes 
to prevent as many future wars as possible, 
and it is also to be borne in mind that the 
majority of those who are killed and of those 
who lose their property in wars are drawn from 
the working classes. 

For the benefit of those who are not yet 
fully informed about the League to Enforce 
Peace and what it stands for it may be well 
to say that it was organized to bring about an 
international alliance that will have the power 
to prevent some wars. It concedes that no 
human agency can prevent all wars, any more 
than a police force, however efficient, can pre- 
vent all crimes. 

Its membership includes the most eminent 
men and women in the country. Among these 
are Senators, Representatives, as many Govern- 
ors and former Governors as there are States in 
the Union, the mayors of many cities, including 
New York, Boston, Baltimore, New Orleans; 
the presidents of more than two score universi- 
ties and colleges, including Harvard, professors 
of political science and international law, and 
so on. 

Because it exists for a single purpose the 
league has been able to bring together for that 
single purpose men from all political parties, 
of all faiths and creeds, and of all shades of 
belief from pacifism to preparedness. 

This purpose is to promote a league of nations 
whose combined moral, economic and military 
power will tend to preserve the peace of the 
world. 

It is proposed to hold international confer- 
ences to codify and supplement international 
law; to establish an international court to try 
causes of dispute between nations; and a coun- 
cil of conciliation to compose difficulties outside 
the jurisdiction of the court. It is further pro- 
posed that the nations in the league shall boy- 
cott and use their military forces against any 
member that commits an act of war against 
another member without first submitting its 
grievance to court or council and awaiting a 
conclusion. 

It is proposed to abolish secret diplomacy, 
which has brought on so many wars by sub- 
mitting therefor delay and public discussion. 
Nations are like men: the longer they talk the 
less likely they are to fight. 

The first annual national assemblage at 
Washington last Mav was attended by more 
than two thousand delegates from every State 
in the Union and representing' every profession 
and occupation. President Wilson, Secretary 
of War Baker and Senator Lodge were among 
the distinguished men who delivered addresses. 
The principles of the league have been indorsed 
in the political platforms of both the Repub- 
lican and the Democratic parties and bv the 
candidates of both parties, by the Chamber of 
Commerce of the United States and by a num- 
ber of other prominent organizations. 

State organizations have been formed in every 
State but four and the counties are now being 
organized. 



Bringing 2300 barrels of salmon, the bark 
"Albert" entered San Francisco harbor on Sep- 
tember S. twenty-five days out from Bristol Bay. 
The "Albert" is the first of the Bristol Bay 
vessels to reach port this season. Captain Hans 
Hansen, skipper, reported exceedingly rough 
weather during the stay in northern waters and 
that at different times a number of the dories 
were swamped, though none of the men were 
drowned. The Olson brothers, owners of the 
bark, made the voyage down the coast on the 
vessel along with fortv-two of the salmon fisher- 
men. The "Albert" will undergo an overhauling 
and then load lumber for Australia. She sails 
under charter to the Vance Lumber Company. 



Two more barges loaded with lumber for 
Anchorage, Alaska, will leave the Columbia 
River before the present season closes, according 
to announcement made recently. The lumber is 
being used in construction work on the Govern- 
ment railroad, and the barge method of trans- 
portation has proved very successful this season. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 5, 1916. 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair. The following were elected 
delegates to the seventeenth annual convention 
of the California State Federation of Labor: 
Otto Dittmar, E. A. Erickson, Frank Johnson, 
Harry Ohlsen, Paul Scharrenberg and Geo. F. 
Steadman. 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 11, 1916. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair. Nominations were made 
for delegates to the New York convention of the 
International Seamen's Union of America. 
JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 4, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 

REGINALD TOWNSEND, Agent. 
Room 11, De Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 

St. 

Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 4, 1916. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 4, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; men scarce; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 4, 1916. 
Shipping fair offshore. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 4, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

E. J. D. LORENTZEN, Agent pro tern. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 4, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 4, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping dull. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 4, 1916. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Aug. 28, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor; a number of 
members around the hall. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 7, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping fair for waiters. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Aug. 31, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping quiet. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Aug. 31, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; plenty of mem- 
bers ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 

P. O. Box No. 54. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 4, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; no members 
ashore. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
98 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 



DIED. 

lose Montenegro, No. 1832, a native of Spain, 
age 30, died at Seattle, Wash., Sept., 1916. 

George Vanderendt, No. 250, a native of Hol- 
land, age 27, was drowned from the bark "Gold- 
,n (ate" at San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 9, 1916. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



MORE INDUSTRIAL VIOLENCE. 



The Committee on Industrial Relations 
has issued the following rq>ort in regard 
to labor conditions on the Mesaba range: 

Every charge brought against the United 
States Steel Corporation by the striking 
iron miners of northern Minnesota is sus- 
tained in a report just submitted to Gov- 
ernor Burnquist by Ids own State Labor 
Commissioner. 

Miners have been exploited by the con- 
tract system, cheated, oppressed, forced to 
give bribes to their mine captains, arrested 
without warrant-, given unfair trials, and 
subjected to "serious injustices" at the 
hands of the mine guards and police. This 
is the substance of the findings. 

.Mine guards employed by the company, 
deputized by Sheriff Meining without in- 
vestigation, and supported by Governor 
Burnquist, are to blame for all disorder. 
The report says : 

"We are not entirely in sympathy with 
the belief that vigorous measures were nec- 
essary to maintain peace and safety in 
this strike. We are entirely satisfied that 
the mine guards have exceeded their legal 
rights and duties and invaded the citizen- 
ship rights of tlie strikers; that such vio- 
lence as has occurred has been more 
chargeable to the mine guards and police 
than to the strikers ; and that the public 
police departments have entirely exceeded 
the needs of the situation, and have perpe 
trated serious injustice upon the strikers. 

"Numerous cases of arrest without war- 
rant, and unfair trials in the justices' 
courts were brought to our attention. We 
will not go into these cases in detail, as 
the Federal men have promised a thorough 
investigation, but we are seriously im- 
pressed that the mine guards should have 
been compelled to remain on nunc prop- 
erty or disarm when they left it. 

"Every shooting affray that has oc- 
curred on the range has occurred on public 
property. In no case have the so-called 
riots occurred on or even near company 
property. 

"The parades of the miners have been 
peaceful, the public police have had no 
trouble in maintaining order, and if the 
private mine guards had been compelled 
to remain on the company property we do 
not believe that there would ever have been 
any bloodshed on the range." 

Governor Burnquist, whose telegram to 
Sheriff Meining was generally accepted as 
an order to go the limit in breaking the 
strike, is now on the defensive. In the 
face of reports from the Committee on In- 
dustrial Relations and from his own State 
Labor Department, he can no longer es- 
cape a reckoning for the part he has 
played in aiding the Steel Corporation to 
maintain industrial tyranny. After read- 
ing the report of his own State Labor De- 
partment he issued a statement saying: 

As an official I am interested only in the en- 
forcement of the law. Personally I have had 
four men up there to investigate conditions and 
none of the four has ever reported to me any 
undue violence on the part of officials. 

Apparently Governor Burnquist's in- 
vestigators were carefully selected. 



The man in the dark follows the cry of 
"Progress" without really knowing whether 
it comes from ahead or from behind 



THE "HEROIC" DETECTIVE. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



A pitiful story, involving the cold- 
blooded cruelty of a detective, was re- 
vealed in a Chicago court when little 
Stephan Busek, of 8733 Burley avenue, was 
arraigned on a charge of "stealing coal" 
after a detective of the Baltimore and 
< >hio Railroad had shot him because he- 
was picking up coal along the tracks of 
the freight terminal of that road. 

Stephen is 7. Already, despite his youth. 
he is sharing the sorrows of his poverty- 
stricken parents. There was not enough 
y in the humble home to buy coal in 
winter. His parents knew it and he knew 
it. And so, instead of playing and roaming 
around as more fortunate boys do in the 
late summer, little Stephan did what hun- 
dreds of other poor lads do. lie went 
along the tracks, picking up pieces of 
coal dropped from wagons or from freight 
cars loading or unloading — pieces of coal 
which a private detective would crush to 
dust as he walked over them. 

As Stephan was engaged in his task of 
collecting this waste coal into a bag so 
the family would not be suffering from 
cold in winter, along came a private de- 
tective of the railroad. Stephan began to 
run as the detective shouted from some 
distance away. As he was running the 
detective shot and wounded the little boy, 
who fell with his burden. 

The detective brought him into court 
on a charge of "stealing." But the judge 
who heard the case took another view 
of the matter. 

He released the boy, holding that there 
was no theft involved in the boy's action. 
Then he turned on the detective and repri- 
manded him for his heartless shooting of 
the lad who had done nothing more than 
to gather up waste coal which could have 
no value to the road which employed the 
guard. 



TRUE PREPAREDNESS. 



"Preparedness which begins and ends 
with increasing our military ami naval 
strength is nothing but militarism. True 
preparedness involves economic, social and 
industrial changes," said Benjamin Marsh, 
executive secretary of the Committee on 
Real Preparedness. 

"We do not oppose adequate national 
defense: we arc not pacifist-. But we re- 
fuse to be Stampeded into what we believe 
to be militarism by men who want big 
armaments because they can make money 
out of them. The real danger comes from 
within — from forces which oppose social 
justice, which defend and promote monop- 
olies that operate against public welfare. 
Low wages, child labor, land monopoly 
and unjust taxation are America's enemies. 
It is these things that we must fight 
against." 



In a state of universal organization 
among the workers one meal would be 
worth all the money in the world. In 
that event the advantage would lie with 
the stomach most inured to abstention. In 
other words, hunger would be the ally, not 
tlie enemy, of the workers. 



"HIGH FINANCE." 



Xo question is ever settled until it is 
settled in accordance with justice. — Wood 
row Wilson. 



"Shipping" Illustrated of New York is 
not a labor paper. It does not even claim 
to be a reform journal. Still, occasionally, 
it utters some great truths and becomes 
exceedingly frank in editorial expressions. 

The following editorial comment on 
"high finance" is particularly candid and 
must be very refreshing to the Wall Street 
buccaneers: 

"A few months ago a well known bank- 
er, Mr. Otto II. Kahn, made in the course 
of a speech which was given wide public- 
ity, the statement that the hostile senti- 
ment of the American public in general 
toward what is known colloquially as 'high 
finance,' was incomprehensible in view of 
the fact that American financial history did 
not contain such episodes as the Panama 
scandals and other infamous financial 
crashes that have taken place at intervals 
in various European countries of the first 
rank. Perhaps it did not occur to Mr. 
Kahn that the outcry raised abroad against 
such swindling as was evidenced in the 
Panama and other similar affairs, is evi- 
dence enough of their rarity and that were 
Panamas usual performances in French 
'high finance.' it is probable that the Amer- 
ican public would know as little about 
them as the French public does about the 
Rock Island revelations and the New 
Haven exposures. The men who in Europe 
were connected with the dirty business 
alluded to in Mr. Kahn's speech, were 
either thrown into jail or made an end of 
themselves by suicide, or, what is about 
the same thing, emigrated to pastures new. 
But the history of American financial cor- 
ruption from the close of the Civil War to 
the present, fails to reveal the name of a 
single light of Wall Street mixed up in the 
looting of public corporations that ever saw 
the inside of an American jail ; save per- 
haps one man caught into a panic without 
which he might have managed to push his 
scheme< to a successful issue and who after 
receiving a long sentence, served a short 
time in jail and was pardoned by the Presi- 
dent on the ground of ill health. Financial 
corruption in railway financing has brought 
in its train demoralization of the train 
service : witness the numerous wrecks that 
marked the end of the old New Haven 
regime and such demoralization inevitably 
results in the destruction of 'esprit dc 
corps' among the men and its substitution 
by the spirit of 'get all you can, boys, 
while the picking is good.'" 



THE DEUTSCHLAND'S CARGO. 



The manifest of the submarine freighter 
"1 )eutschland" on her return voyage to 
Bremen is at last available. The declara- 
tion as filed at the Custom House shows: 
Rubber. 802,037 pounds; nickel, 752,674 
pounds: tin, 181,049 pounds. These com- 
modities are evidently the ones in greatest 
need in Germany and will therefore bring 
a high price. This shipment indicates the 
submarine as having a cargo carrying 
capacity of about 800 tons. 



Truth gains more even by the errors of 
one, who, with due study and preparation, 
thinks for himself, than by the true Opin- 
ions of those who only hold them because 
they do not suffer themselves to think. - 
John Stuart Mill. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE BALEARIC ISLES. 



The announcement, made some time ago 
by their Spanish governor, General Borbon, 
that he is about to set out on a grand 
plan of works with the object of placing 
the Balearic Isles in a state of defense, 
reminds a forgetful world, once again of 
"The Forgotten Isles." Perhaps it is be- 
cause the little archipelago, lying in the 
Mediterranean some 150 miles from the 
coast of Spain, has never been really "dis- 
covered" by the tourist, that they so sel- 
dom figure in the world's news. School- 
boys know all about them, of course. They 
come in their natural order in response to 
authoritative requests for an enumeration 
or the more important islands in the 
Mediterranean. Poidtry fanciers, too, know 
something of them ; anyway, they con- 
stantly refer to the two most important 
islands in the group, though it is at least 
doubtful whether they are always aware 
how the Minorca and Majorca hens they 
value so highly came by their house name. 
The general public, however, only remem- 
bers them as it remembers grammar or 
vulgar fractions. 

And yet the islands have a stirring his- 
torical record. It begins, as does that of 
all the lands, hereabouts, in the remotest 
past. Greek and Roman writers refer to 
the Boetian and Rhodian settlements on 
the islands; but there are tales and tradi- 
tions of a wild race that inhabited the 
Balearic Isles long before the days of the 
settlers from Rhodes and Boetia. The 
first certain record begins to form itself 
some five centuries B. C., when the ubiqui- 
tous Carthaginian appeared on the scene. 

The Phoenician colonies which had been 
founded by Tyre and Sidon in Sicily and 
Spain began, about this time, to be threat- 
ened by the Greeks and they sought the 
help of Carthage. The Carthaginian was 
nothing loath. He promptly came to the 
help of the Phoenician. Greek expansion 
was checked ; whilst the Carthaginian es- 
tablished himself on the Sicilian coast and 
the neighboring islands, as far as the 
P>alearic Islands, and the coast of Spain. 
On the Balearic Islands, he took complete 
possession, built himself cities and de- 
veloped trade on land and sea, as was ever 
his wont. On the fall of Carthage the 
islands reverted to Rome, and Rome with 
all its accustomed energy took the matter 
in hand. 

The islanders had been accused of piracy, 
a not uncommon failing with them 
throughout the centuries which followed, 
and Q. Caecilius Metellus was sent against 
them. Ouintus did his work thoroughly. 
He not only quickly reduced the islands to 
obedience, but he settled there Roman and 
Spanish colonists, founded cities and in- 
troduced the cultivation of the olive. As 
was so often the case, Rome drew on her 
new possessions to supply her growing 
armies, and every schoolboy is familiar 
with the wonders performed by Caesar's 
famous Balearic slingers. The Roman gen- 
eral, moreover, greatly favored the mules 
which came from Minorca, as did the Ro- 
man merchant its sinople and pitch. There- 
after the Balearic Isles followed the for- 
tunes of Rome, and shortly after the fall 
of the empire in the west they were seized 
by the Vandals. That was. in A. D. 423. 

After the Vandals, in due order, came the 



Moors, three centuries later, and after 
sundry vicissitudes the islands, in 1009, 
became a separate Moorish kingdom. 

Then came more piracy; no one was safe 
from it, and gradually the islanders made 
themselves so thoroughly obnoxious to 
their neighbors that a regular league was 
formed against them. Pope Paschal II. 
directed the crusade, and the Catalans 
took the lead in the matter and launched 
an expedition against the islands. It was 
not, however, until over 100 years later 
that the Moors were finally conquered and 
expelled. This was effected in 1232 by 
James I. of Aragon, who conferred the 
sovereignty of the isles on his third son, 
and under him and his successors they 
formed a separate kingdom, until 1349, 
when they were once again joined to Spain. 
During the wars of the Spanish succes- 
sion Port Mahon, on the island of Minorca, 
was captured by the English under General 
Stanhope, and subsequently, by the peace 
of Utrecht, the English secured the whole 
island. It was captured by the French 
in 1756, and restored to the English in 
1763; retaken by the Spaniards in 1782; 
again seized by the British in 1798, and 
finally ceded to Spain by the peace of 
Amiens in 1803. During the Peninsular 
war, the islanders took an active part in 
helping the Allies, but since the second 
treaty of Paris, for just over a hundred 
years, the history of the Balearic Isles 
has been one of unbroken peace. 

As to the people, they are near akin 
to the Catalans on the mainland. They 
are industrious and hospitable, and pride 
themselves not a little on their special 
loyalty to the Spanish throne. 



WHAT BLACKSTONE SAID. 



"There is nothing which so generally 
strikes the imagination, and engages the 
affections of mankind, as the right of 
property; or that sole and despotic do- 
minion which one man claims and exer- 
cises over the external things of the world. 
in total exclusion of the right of any 
other individual in the universe. And yet 
there are very few that will give them- 
selves the trouble to consider the original 
and foundation of this right. Pleased as 
we are with the possession, we seem afraid 
to look back to the means by which it was 
acquired, as if fearful of some defect in our 
title ; or at best we rest satisfied with the 
decision of the laws in our favor, without 
examining the reason or authority upon 
which these laws have been built. We 
think it enough that our title is derived by 
the grant of the former proprietor, by de- 
scent from our ancestors, or by the last 
will and testament of the dying owner; not 
caring to reflect that (accurately and 
strictly speaking) there is no foundation in 
nature or natural law, why a set of words 
upon parchment should convey the do- 
minion of land." — From Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries on the laws of England. 



The labor movement should be guarded 
against the growth that results in reple- 
tion. Strength and vitality depend upon 
preserving a mean between the weakness 
of small, and the lethargy of large, bodies. 



The "spirit of organization" and the 
"spirit of progress" are interchangeable 
terms. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 406 N. Clark Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 365. 

BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. T. 

Milwaukee, Wli. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL, DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELEF STATIONS: 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc. Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Wis. SnKinaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

T Aldington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



no longer be bothered with wage scales 
and arbitration proceedings, but the com- 
pany will demand that no chimpanzee 
farmed out by it shall be worked more 
than 14 hours a day and that they shall be 
fed at least three times every 24 hours on 
cocoanuts, squid, sea weed and chocolate 
candy. 

To silence the scoffer and doubting 
Thomas, Mr. Cole forwards the picture of 
Biz Fox, seated in front of a linotype 
machine, as proof that another labor dis- 
placer is here. 



A "Surprised" Employer. 

In response to a request for information 
regarding the strike at the Belmont (O.) 
Casket Manufacturing Company, by the 
president of the Shadyside Board of Trade, 
Secretary-Treasurer Albin blamed "paid 
mercenaries" for all the trouble. The em- 
ployes asked that their union be recognized, 
but this seems so astounding that Mr. Albin 
writes : 

"The demand was so unreasonable and 
it embodies such destructive possibilities 
that the company refused to consider it. 
We resent the implication that the com- 
pany cannot be trusted to deal honestly and 
fairly with its men." 

The company employs twelve different 
kinds of craftsmen, and while railroad 
shops, employing a larger number of crafts, 
can negotiate a federated wage scale, this 
is impossible in the case of Mr. Albin, 
who paints this alarming picture : 

"Anyone can see that an arbitrary ad- 
justment of wages would be impossible, 
and would result in internal discord, con- 
stant friction between our employes, which 
would become a permanent characteristic 
of the factory, and would finally mean 
bankruptcy for the employes and the com- 
pany and throw this business to our com- 
petitors." 

The strikers are asking for a union shop, 
union recognition, nine-hour day, time and 
one-half for overtime, double time for Sun- 
days and holidays, a minimum increase of 
2y 2 cents an hour for male workers and a 
minimum of $1 a day for girls. 



Iron Molders Sued to Depress Strikers. 

Because of iron molders' strikes against 
four plants in Bridgeport, Conn., these con- 
cerns each demand $50,000 damages, and 
attachments have been placed on the homes 
of strikers and their savings accounts in the 
various banks. 

The Bridgeport manufacturers do not 
charge boycotting, their claim is intimida- 
tion. These cases do not involve a ques- 
tion of interstate commerce, as in the 
Danbury hatters' case, and will, therefore, 
be contested in the State court. 

The manufacturers allege that they "are 
informed and believe" that a large number 
of employes are willing to work but they 
are deterred because of threats and fear of 
bodily harm. The manufacturers further 
state that they have lost large sums of 
money through a failure to deliver con- 
tracts because of the strike. The manu- 
facturers imply that a handful of iron 
molders have brought about a state of 
anarchy in Bridgeport that cannot be dealt 
with by any police power, Governor or 
State militia and that the only solution is 
to seize the homes and bank savings of 



these outlaws, after which they may return 
to work and the employers' large contracts 
will be fulfilled. 

The cases will be heard by the Superior 
Court next month, and will be contested 
by the iron molders' organization. 

The iron molders struck to enforce a 
demand for $3.75 for a nine-hour workday. 
The present rates are lower than surround- 
ing cities and the Bridgeport men recently 
formed a union. It is stated that most of 
them are Hungarians and that many were 
imported several years ago to smash the 
Iron Molders' Union. 

Former Judge Nicholson, attorney for the 
manufacturers, acknowledges this is a 
fight against unionism. He said: "We 
are fighting for the principle of the open 
shop. Injunctions against the union are 
of no use. The organizers simply do the 
same thing in another way." 

The attorney admitted that the peculiar 
laws of Connecticut make it possible to 
bring this suit. Connecticut is the only 
State in the union where personal property 
may be attached prior to judgment. 



Against Picketing. 

The Washington State Federation of 
Labor is in the thick of a fight to repeal 
the anti-picketing law, rushed through the 
State Legislature and approved by the 
Governor between March 4 and March 19, 
last year. While the law prohibits picket- 
ing it is an attack on free speech, free 
press and all other forms of publicity, which 
is defined in Section 1 : 

"Whoever shall, for the purpose of car- 
rying on, calling attention to, or adver- 
tising, directly or indirectly, any contro- 
versy, disagreement or dispute between 
any labor union or organization, or mem- 
ber or members thereof and any person 
engaged in any lawful business, or his 
employe, or for the purpose of hindering 
or preventing such person from conduct- 
ing his business in any lawful way. or 
employing or retaining in his employ any 
person who may lawfully engage in such 
business." 

The law specificaly sates that "any per- 
son who shall engage in picketing shall 
be guilty of a misdemeanor." 

Trade unionists are asking citizens to aid 
them in repealing this statute. 



Tire Makers Raise Wages. 

Six hundred rubber workers employed by 
the Michelin Tire Company at Milltown, 
N. J., have raised wages from 2 to 5}4 
cents an hour, after a short strike. The 
lowest rate was 17 cents an hour before 
the strike, now it is 22 cents. A. F. of L. 
Organizer Hilfers conducted negotiations 
for the men and later organized them. 
Few can speak English and most of them 
are Hungarians, Poles, Slavs and Russians. 
The company refused to meet Organizer 
Hilfers in person, but consented to talk 
with him over the telephone. 

The strikers showed a contract, consist- 
ing of about 1000 words, which the com- 
pany presents to these men. few of whom 
understand the English language. Alleg- 
ing that company secrets must be pro- 
tected, all men who receive 21 x /2 cents an 
hour shall be paid during the month of 
each April an amount for the preceding 
year that shall not be less than $17.33 for 
the entire year. The plan includes other 
elaborate systems and provides that for 



three years after he has terminated his 
employment with the company, "no matter 
how or for what cause," the employee shall 
not engage in the manufacture or sale or 
study of articles of the same class or kind 
or in any manner similar to anything 
manufactured or sold or studied by the 
Michelin Tire Company. 

The contract also includes this interest- 
ing clause : 

"That all inventions and improvements 
made in whole or in part by him (the 
employee) or under his direction or at his 
suggestion during his employment by the 
Michelin Tire Company, shall be its prop- 
erty and that for the purpose of vesting 
in it such inventions or improvements he 
will execute such papers as may be neces- 
sarv." 



Hogs Versus Children. 

United States Senator Bryan of Florida 
opposed the Child Labor bill on the ground 
that it invades "State's rights," and Dixie, 
a weekly newspaper published in Jackson- 
ville, says: 

"State's rights is a bugaboo used only 
at times by near-statesmen when it serves 
their purpose. 

"When hog cholera measures are con- 
sidered they want the Government as a 
whole to act as protector of the hog. 

"But when a Governmental question is 
proposed to protect the American child 
from the poisoned atmosphere of the un- 
sanitary factories they cry 'Invading the 
rights of States.' 

"Do they consider the hog superior and 
of more importance than the child?" 



Striking iron molders, Bridgeport, Conn., 
whose property has been seized by employ- 
ers, have outwitted authorities who are 
levying on all money in sight. Unionists 
not members of the Iron Molders' Union 
act as custodian of strike funds and the 
sheriff is helpless unless he finds the money 
on the person of the strikers. To date no 
striker has been found asleep. 

Under the law of this State property of 
workers can be attached before a judgment 
is secured. In no other State is this pro- 
cedure permitted, and it is now being used 
by Bridgeport founders to discourage 
striking iron molders. In other States a 
judgment must first be secured before 
property or moneys is seized, but in Con- 
necticut employers can, as one trade un- 
ionist put it, "seize the worker's property 
and force him to go to law to recover it." 



Car Men Gain Ground. 

A three-year union shop agreement be- 
tween the Birmingham, Ala., Street Car 
Men's Union and the street car company 
has been ratified by both parties. Wage 
increases that will average 2 l / 2 cents an 
hour September 1, 1917, have been secured. 

The union shop clause provides : 

"All employees who are or who may be- 
come members of this association shall 
remain members in good standing in accord- 
ance with the laws of the association dur- 
i; g the life of this agreement, and any 
member who fails to comply with this 
section shall be dismissed from the service 
of the company." 

The employees are pledged to give their 
earnest cooperation to prevent personal in- 
jury, loss of life and damage to property, 
and assist in every way the "safety first" 
organization of the company. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



SALT WATER AS A HEALER. 



If you must go to war, go on shipboard. 
Here you will be surrounded by the best 
curative bath in the world — cubic miles of 
it — always ready for application and always 
containing the precise mixture of saline in- 
gredients that will be best for you. It will 
be remembered that some biologists con- 
sider sea water the representative of the 
earliest organic serum. It is the medium 
in and through which the first animal life 
developed, and while it has cooled off — the 
blood heat of "warm-blooded" animals 
probably representing its original temper- 
ature — it retains practically the chemical 
composition that it had when it nourished 
and sheltered the primitive protozoans. 
Even now it may be used in transfusion, 
with success, to replace actual blood. We 
are told by Dr. James J. Walsh, writing in 
the New York Herald, that sailors' wounds, 
in the present war, have healed much bet- 
ter than soldiers'. Though sailors are often 
wounded by shells and have serious con- 
tusions and lacerations of muscles and 
ugly, gaping wounds of all kinds, their 
wounds heal almost as a rule by first in- 
tention, while those of the soldiers are 
long in healing, are disturbed by compli- 
cations, often require long convalescence, 
and leave the soldier seriously crippled, 
though the sailor is ready for service again 
very often in a short time. Says Dr. 
Walsh : 

"The main reason was considered to be 
that the sailor, living the free, open life, 
with regular eating, was in much better 
physical condition to have his wounds heal 
rapidly, especially when compared to the 
soldier, who has had to live during this 
war, sometimes insufficiently fed, in 
trenches, badly drained and exposed to the 
inclemencies of the weather, often without 
proper protection. The soldier's wounds 
were also complicated by contamination 
with bacteria from the soil, for many of 
the trenches have had to be made through 
cultivated fields, and some of the most 
fatal forms of bacilli for men occur just 
beneath the surface of cultivated fields. 

"It was noted that the sailors' recoveries 
from their wounds occurred promptly in 
spite of the fact that many of those under 
observation had been plunged in cold sea 
water for a half an hour, or sometimes 
even longer, after they received their 
wounds. It was felt that this exposure to 
salt water must surely represent an added 
disadvantage for the sailor, though his 
magnificent vitality enabled him to over- 
come even the shock of the cold and the 
supreme effort needed to save himself from 
drowning. Further study of these cases 
has, however, led to quite a different con- 
clusion. 

"The immersion in sea water for a rather 
prolonged time, instead of being harmful, 
is now looked upon as actually beneficial, 
and some of the most important authorities 
in surgery and bacteriology in the world 
are recommending that when wounds are 
large and gaping, and, above all, are deep 
and involve muscles, they should be treated 
by applications of cold salt water of the 
same strength in salt as sea water, or per- 
haps a little stronger, because this predis- 
poses to such a condition in the tissues as 
enables the wounded individual to throw 
off infectious material, and prevents the 
absorption of such toxic substances as al- 



most surely delay healing and even weaken 
the constitution." 

In a recently issued series of directions 
for the treatment of wounded soldiers, 
emanating from the British army medical 
service, and representing, Dr. Walsh be- 
lieves, "the very last word of practical ad- 
vice from experts," the necessity for free 
drainage is emphasized, and, above all, the 
application of salt solution. He says, in 
substance : 

"The war wounds can not be compared 
to any of the accident wounds seen in civil 
surgery. They usually present a torn and 
ragged tract, with an irregular surface of 
heights and hollows produced by the pro- 
jection of muscle-bundles and the retrac- 
tion here and there of several muscular 
fibers. If the projectile or any portion of 
it has hit a bone this usually will be splin- 
tered and the track will lead down into 
widely ramifying crevices between the 
splintered fragments. 

"In these conditions it is no wonder 
that antiseptics of any kind or strength 
can not follow the track of the wound, 
but produce only a superficial destruction 
of whatever microbes may be present. The 
projectile itself seldom carries microbes 
with it, because it has usually been sub- 
jected to such a high degree of heat as to 
destroy them, and even the friction through 
the air in its flight would rather thoroughly 
remove them. But shreds of clothing are 
almost inevitably carried into the depths 
of the wound, and if there has been any 
dirt on the skin surface, that, too, is likely 
to be distributed rather deeply in the tis- 
sues. Needless to say, trench-fighting sol- 
diers can not keep unsoiled. 

"It is curious to reflect that after all our 
studies of materials for application to 
wounds to prevent septic complications and 
the serious consequences due to microbes, 
great surgeons should now on the advice 
of expert bacteriologists be going back to 
the simplest dressing that was ever ap- 
plied to wounds. It is well known that 
sailors have, at least when unsophisticated 
by modern ideas, had a tradition that 
wounds did very well after soaking in sea 
water. 

"It is an age-old custom on farms to 
wash off wounds with salt water, and cer- 
tain wounds have always been treated very 
simply by direct applications of salt or of 
quite strong salt solutions. There has been 
a tendency to dismiss these old-fashioned 
practices as quite without any significance 
and as probably representing merely a 
groping after something or other that 
might be of service rather than as the re- 
sult of careful observation. Here, how- 
ever, is an extremely interesting reversion, 
which makes it quite clear that very prob- 
ably the old-fashioned customs in these 
matters were founded directly on experi- 
ence and long practical observation." 



LOOKING AHEAD. 



We see great corporations buying up 
mines and mineral deposits which they can 
not use now, and do not intend to use for 
the present, but whose purchase price goes 
into their financial reckonings and consti- 
tutes part of the basis upon which we 
have to pay the prices charged for their 
products. In this way one generation i= 
paying for what the next generation will 
use. — Woodrow Wilson. 



Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where thy have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 

■ 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C, 1424 Government St. 

VANCOUVER, B. C., 213 Hastings St., E. corner of 
Hastings and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2216 North 30th St 

SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 242 Flanders SL 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 674. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Room No. 203, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 214. 
PORTLAND, Ore., 89 Second St. N. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 64. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca SL. P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 
PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneca SL 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada, 437 Gore Ave. 
PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada, P. O. Box 9«s. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Oregon, P. O. Box 138. 

BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 10 East Street 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M Street 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



EureKa, Cal. 



About 6000 barbers in the southern 
section of New York, known as 
"down town," have won a two days' 
strike and increased wages $1 a 
week. Officers of the Journeymen 
Barbers' International Union are as- 
sisting in an organizing campaign 
that will include other sections of 
New York. 

At the recent convention of the 
Xpw York State Federation of Labor 
the militia laws and State police 
statutes were condemned and it was 
resolved to take measures "to pre- 
vent the establishment of any such 
system of Russian cossacks, Irish 
constabulary. Mexican rurales and 
blackhorse cavalry." 

The Boston Telephone Operators' 
Union has signed an agreement with 
the New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. With the ex- 
ception of operators just out of 
training school, all will receive wage 
increases, ranging from 50 cents to 
$2 a week. Besides these increases 
there will be shorter hours. 

The Central West Coal Company 
of Marinette, Wis., believes in "free- 
dom" to such an extent that it held 
back wages it promised imported 
"free and independent" workmen. 
The company has a strike of strike- 
breakers on its hands as a result. 
Former employes demand a nine- 
hour day, improved working condi- 
tions and a living wage. 

General Manager Crosby of the 
struck Lewando plant, at Watertown. 
Mass., was a witness at a hearing 
of the State Board of Conciliation 
and Arbitration, which is attempting 
to adjust the strike. Mr. Crosby 
refused to accept the statement that 
the weekly wage of strikers was 
$12.75. lie said some of the "smarter" 
workers made $26 a week. He gave 
the name of one, and was positive 
there were others in this list. 

About 2500 machinists employed 
by the Winchester Repeating Arms 
Company at New Haven, Conn., are 
on strike for an eight hour day. 
The company employs about 18,000 
workers. It threatens to close down 
its factory, .but the strikers ask what 
will become of the juicy war orders. 
As usual in these cases, the "labor 
agitator" is blamed for putting 
shorter workday notions into the 
heads of employes. Fifty-one local 
manufacturers have signed a state- 
ment in which they notify the world 
"that under the present conditions 
we will not make any general change 
in our schedule of working hours, 
nor grant'any demands that are be- 
ing promoted by labor agitators." 

Missouri State Federation of Labor 
officials are asking affiliated unions 
to contribute to a fund that will 
permit the employment of compe- 
tent lawyers to draft a Workmen's 
Compensation Act. The incident 
again illustrates the unselfishness of 
trade unionism. In this agitation the 
unorganized are voiceless. Neither 
do they contribute money to make 
possible a law that will protect both 
them and their dependents. Event- 
ually Missouri will pass a compensa- 
tion law that will apply to all work- 
ers. And as usual, when this law 
becomes effective society will over- 
look the fighting force that made 
the enactment possible, while courts 
will issue injunctions against unions 
and employers will plead for the 
non-union shop to protect the in- 
dependence (?) of their "free" work- 
men. 



Office Phone 
Elliott 1196 



MARSHALL'S 



Residence 
North 3445 



NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

Compasses Adjusted 

301-2 P. I. BUILDING, Next to Post Office 

Established 1890 SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 
1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St 
Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wath., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can. 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 

Ackerson, A. R. Laamanen, 1. 

Andersen, A. -1821 Laine. A. V. 

Andersen, P. T. Larsen, Nels 

Andersen, Oscar Lai sen. C. A. 

Andersen -918 Larson. Ed 

Alfredsen, Adolf Larsen, Axel 

Anderson. Ole A. Livingstone E. 

Andersen, A. C. Mathfsen, Sisunl 

-1108 Magnusen. Lars 
Anderson, G. (Cas- Macfarlane, Jas. 

s ( e ) Maenads, Henry 

Anderson, John M. Tntosh. James 
Anderson, Alf. -16S8 Mirtenen, John 

Anderson. Albert Morrisay. Ja 

Astaa, Ole Mynkmeyer. H 

B.kker Geo. K. Mikkelsm. K. -1620 

P.ranz. J. A. Miller. James 

Behm, F. Morten.sen. J. K. 

Benson D Moore. Albert 
Benson] C." A. -1894 Newlaad, Ernst 

Bergstrom, A. Nygren. Gufl 

Bach M Nielsen. Estwan 

Billst'ein," K. Xilsen. £eder 

Brennan, P. Nitske C. 

Bessen. George Nygard. Oluf 

Berg. Johannes Ness. J. 

Carlson, John Nelsen, Adolf 

Connor, W. F. Nelsen. A \\ 

c.irruthers. M. Olsen, A. M. -94J 

Christensen. -1366 Ojsen. James 

Carlson. Gust Ol-sen. Telle 

Cottingham. F. Olsen. Harald 

navidsen. John Olsen. Ole 

can, Geo. O sen. C. A. -1303 

Eggers, J. O. W. Olsson. I. H 

Eriksen. Otto °,' son - Sl '11 

Erdman, Paul O sen. Chr. M. 

Erikson, J. R. °J sf>n - Oswald 

Erbe. L. J. Ozerhowski Leo 

Bspedal, J. E lr J, 7 : m: : n - '', D ' 

Evans J Publieates. Aug. 

Ferney S Peterson. W. 

Fernqu'lst, C. W. Peterson, Calls 

Ford E Powers. .Limes A. 

FranzelL A. Pabst. Max 

Fredericksen, B. J. Petersen. Eawrenee 

Gardner, James Permin, J. 

Gabrielsen. P. Poobus. S 

Oerher Fritz Rostoln. A. M. 

("ilrnv Wm Rasmussen, John 

Hansen. Ole Reaues. N R. 

TTaavold. P. TjpininW Ft. 

Haugrud, H. O. Robberstad. Nils 

Halmstrom. Harry Rundstrnm A 

TTalin J Salvesen. Soerdrup 

Hemes. K. ? nn , ,rli(1 * K "' 

Render-sen, Rob. g pf> .' p y. T. 

Hohn. H. P. -2081 Stein. Herman 

TJohne. A. S! am "l er3o A nan i, C ' 

TTotten, C. Strasdin. A. W. 

Hunter, Ernest »«msirisr. C. jr. 

FTalvorsen, John L. S*muelsen. w. e. 
Haug G H Sfliaiirman « . 

iversen, Ole' ° a " nT : sor V °' 

Jacobson, J. S»ffala. E. 

Jaeobson. O. «kedsm^e \. 

Jensen. Hans =tohr. F C. 

.Tnhansen. Onear Sorsrer. F 

.Tnrirensen. Olaf =trand. Ch. 

.Tunge, H. StST^J 1 »?• 

.Tohanson, Aug. Strand. AV 

Jonsson, Karl Tiormen. K. \T 

Johnsen. Peder T,]ii e ntv<=v-,. Carl 
Johnson. A. W. -*186Taft. Han= 
Tansson. B. E. H. Thnrsen. And ■•<"«• 

Jorgensen. Oluf ^'il»ntinsen. G. 

i?nutsen Pete ■Walters All". 

K-orki. .t ^r,"^""-. 1 ■ 

Koeh. W. ™ i ''Y st 'y i A 

K-lnrsvlk. Johnn Wetland. -To1.>. 

Kristtansen. Xils W e «rerli"»fl, Al 

r-alherg. Arvid ^ a L ! l h ; VA - ^ 

Krup-er. Johan ™ '"'f T. C 

Lewis. James ^ iekstrom, Anton 

Lundereen. Carl Young. A. 



Phone Main 1202 

L. V. WESTERMAN 

CLOTHIER 

FURNISHER and HATTER 

ALASKA OUTFITTER 

220-222 First Avenue South, at Main 

SEATTLE 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 

Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 

boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 

Instructor in New York Nautical College. 

Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 

Third Floor, First Avenue Side 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka. Cal. 

Teddy a Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP'OF COFFEE 

— or — 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts.. Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms. Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Adolfsson, Gottfrld Melngall, M. 

Bratt, F. H. Nielsen, Niels -751 

Carlson, Gustaf Olsson, Per 

Hodson, H. I. Peel, Peter 

Jaeobson. Gustaf Simonson. Sigvard 

Jensen, Hans -1555 Soter, Erik 

Lundgren, Carl Suominen, Oskar 

Magnusson, Ernest Svensen, John 

W. rjllmaa, Emil 

Marks. Thorwald Vigen, Ellas 
Martinsson. E. 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 
• Trunks and Suitcases • 



Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 8393 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Alfred Pettersen Hilland, a native 
of Bergen, Norway, age 44, is in- 
quired for by his brother, Randolph 
Pettersen. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, 100 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 7-26-16 

Gumersindo Fernandez, formerly 
messboy on steamer "Watson," 
should call at the offices of Nathan 
H. Frank, 1215 Merchants Exchange 
Bldg., San Francisco, and receive 
salvage money due him from S. S. 
"Camino." 8-30-16 



Eureka, Cal., Letter Litt 

Contreras, Julio Kustel. Victor J. 

Kyrkslatt, Lars Klnowsky, A. 

Lawrence, Harry Ingebrethsen, Alf. 
Melander, G. L. 



Alaska Fishermen 



Arentse, John 
Ast, P. 

Brormare. Adolf 
Carey, Arthur L. 
Frost. H. C. 
Hakanson. John 
Jansen. Jacob 
Jansson, Axel. J. 
Johnsen. Harry 
Johnsen, August 



Koester, Ernst 
Kester, Erich 
Knudsen. O. 
Larsen, Martin 
Nelson. Chas. R. 
Noland. Edvard 
Odland. Sven 
Petersen, Andrew 
Werner, Chas. J. 
Wilhelmson, Seth 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Ingvald Andreas Hansen, alias 
Andrew Hansen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 36; tall, dark; last 
heard of July, 1905. His address 
then was, Andrew Hansen, Karluk, 
Kodiak Island, Alaska. He is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Staff Captain Robert Smith, 
district officer, native work, Alaska, 
Box 925, Wrangell. 4-13-15 

Olof Pedersen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 60, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify J. T. 
Miles, 761 Greenwich St., New York, 
N. V. 2-16-16 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Thomas Rowe (now aged about 
74), who was at one time a seaman 
and longshoreman on the Pacific 
Coast and also served in the Pacific 
Coast Navy Yards, will greatly oblige 
inquiring relatives by supplying such 
information. Address, Editor, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 1-5-6 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET AT THIRD AND KEARNY 

FALL STYLES NOW READY 
FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

Prices $30 to $50 

Unl ° n OvMa d Sho'n Our QpEN SATURDA Y EVENINGS UNTIL 10 O'CLOCK 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 



Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 



P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Andreasen, N. S. 
Anderson, N. P. 
Anderson, Nils 
Anderson, Rasmus 
Adolfsen, John 
Andreson, Hans 
Anderson, Gotfrid 
Benson, S. 
Bernhardsen, Chas. 
Bernadt, H. W. 
Brien, Hans 
Bosse, Geo. 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Dybdal, Olaf 
Edstrom, John 
Erickson. Eric 
Fisher, Fritz 
Hoten, J. 

Henriks, Waldemar 
Hagen, Arthur 
Hein, M. 
Hylander, Gust 
Jespersen, Martin 
Jonsson, Karl 
Jensen, Henry 
Johansen, Nikolai 
Jarwinen, John 



Johansson, Chas. 

-2407 
Karlsen, Ingvald 
Kjer, Magnus 
Kristensen, Wm. 
Lindberg, A. C. 
Dange, Peter H. 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Ljungstrom, John 
Larsson, C. -1S32 
Molen, Derk von 
Nygren, Gust 
Ohlsson, J. W. 
Oglive, Wm. A. 
Paulson, Herman 
Palm, P. A. 
Roos, Oscar 
Rensmand, Robert 
Rosenberg, Adolf 
Ryberg, S. 
Smith, John 
Swanson, John L. V 
Schroder, Paul 
Sward, A. 
Tuhkanen, J. J. 
Westengren, C. W. 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



When in Aberdeen Trade at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Patrick McFee, who was cook on 
board the schooner "Robert Henry" 
on a voyage to Mexico last year, is 
inquired for by the U. S. Shipping 
Commissioner, at San Francisco, Cal. 

9-15-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers 9 Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



Union 



MADE 

Beer 




*&&> Of America rt&xr 

COPYRIGHT &TBADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 

THIS IS OUR LABEL 



DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Albers, George Krause, Otto 

Anderson, William Kuldsen, John 

Anderson, John Koster, Walter 

Anderson, Chris. Kottler, William 

Anderson, A. P. Kard, Hjalmar 

Andersen, Andrew Lindholm, John 
Andersen, Olaf -1118L,indgren, Ernst 

Bjerk, Gustav Lindroos, A. W. 

Bjerk, Geo. Lundkvist, Alarick 

Burmeister, T. Ludvigsen, Arne 

Bjorklund, G. Leedham, Max 

Benson, W. J. Lucey, James 

Bowman, C. McLeave, John 

Brogard, N. Munsen, Fred 

Bohn, Gus Nilsen, Harry 

Carlson, Adolf M. Nielsen, C. 

Carlson, Gustaf Nordman, Karl 

Carlson, Walter Olsen, W. 

Christiansen, Paaso, Andrew 

Dedrick Pettersen, Karl 

Crentz, F. Peterson, Nels 

Davis, Frank A. Peters, Walter 

Deam, James Peitsan, Jacob 

Donalson, Harry Pedersen, Alf 

Eriksen, Ole Risenius, Sven 

Grau, Aksil -1116 Rudt, Walter 

Gronros, Oswald Robertson, A. 

Gronlund, Oskar Scheftner, Bemhard 

-414 Sandgvist, Junnar 

Gueno, Pierre Stemvall, Sigurd 

Harlev, Alex Sward, Arnold 

Holmroos, W. Scarabosio. M. 

High. Edward Skotel, A. 

Hansen. Ove Max Toves, H. C. 

Hansen, Jack Torin, Gustaf A. 

Hansen, Thorleif Windt, Walter 

Hylander, Gustaf Williams, T. C. 

Jensen, L,. "Waaler, Edgar 

Jensen, L. M. P. Wehrman, John 

John, F. Johanson Wagner. Ed. 

Johnsen, Walter Wedequist. Axel 
Johansen, A. Harry Packages. 

Johnson, Fred -1723 Benson, Charles 

Johansson, Arvo Houstor, Harry 
Johnson, Alexander 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Hans Nilson, a native of Tons- 
berg, Norway, was last heard from 
at Mobile, Ala., is inquired for by 
his mother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts kindly notify Louis 
Donald, Norwegian Vice Consul, 77 
St. Francis St., Mobile, Ala. 12-22-15 

Oscar Olsen, age 37, a native of 
Hallerna, near Gothenborg, Sweden, 
who was sailing on the Great Lakes 
about three years ago, is inquired 
for by John V. Olsen, Sun Com- 
pany, Marcus Hook, Pa. 5-26-15 

Hugo Carlson Ljung, age 29, a 
native of Gothenborg, Sweden, was 
last heard from in a Cable Boat on 
the Atlantic Coast, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify John Carl- 
son Ljung, Jungmansgatan 5, Goth- 
enborg, Sweden. 1-12-16 

Knut Jensen, No. 5018, a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, a 
native of Denmark, is inquired for 
by his wife, Lieschen Jensen, of 
Tangemunde, A/Elbe Ostenerweg, 
No. 7, Germany. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify the Lake 
Seamen's Union, 133 Clinton street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 4-14-15 



Port Townsend, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Paul Laux, American, age 23, 6 
feet tall, who was last heard from 
about 4 years ago at San Jose, Cal., 
supposed to be a sailor, is inquired 
for. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify his father, Carl 
Laux, 112 E. 28th St., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 6-21-16 

Adolph Krakan, last heard of at 
Port Pirie, January, 1912, and again 
in March, 1913, from Warumbo, 118 
miles from Adelaide, South Australia, 
is inquired for by his mother at 
Hamburg, Germany. 8-25-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and 
blue eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Any information regarding Wilhelm 
Kuhme, age 27, a native of Germany, 
who was supposed to have been 
drowned in the wreck of the steam 
schooner "Francis H. Leggett," Sep- 
tember 18, 1914, will be thankfully re- 
ceived by the German Consul, San 
Francisco, Cal. 1-19-16 

Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from 
since 1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother, J. Marjama, 51 
South St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 

Bernard Baasen, a native of She- 
boygan, Wis., a former member of 
the L. S. U., who was last heard 
from at Milwaukee, Wis., April 29, is 
inquired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. Sophie Baarsen, 561 Clinton 
street, Milwaukee, Wis. 7-5-16 




San Francisco is to be the pioneer 
in the municipal operation of auto 
buses for street traffic. Before the 
year is out buses carrying passen- 
gers and running on regular sched- 
ules will be operated in connection 
with the Municipal Railways. 

The Texas primaries resulted in re- 
nomination by the Democrats of 
Senator Charles A. Culberson over 
ex-Governor Oscar B. Colquitt by 
about 60,000 majority. The issue was 
endorsement of President Wilson's 
Mexican policy, which Culberson up- 
held and Colquitt condemned. 

The Adamson eight-hour day bill, 
passed by Congress to prevent a 
nation-wide strike of railroad men, 
was signed by President Wilson on 
September 3 in his private car at the 
Washington (D. C.) Union station, 
where he stopped on his way from 
Shadow Lawn, N. J., to Hodgenville, 
Kentucky. 

E. P. Ripley, president of the 
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe 
Railway, declared in a formal state- 
ment that the Santa Fe does not in- 
tend to comply with the Adamson 
eight-hour law, recently enacted by 
Congress to avert a threatened rail- 
road strike until ordered to do so by 
the United States Supreme Court. 

Dr. A. G. Hyde, head of the State 
hospital in Cleveland, reports that 
during the year just closed, 131 pa- 
tients, or 22 per cent, of those ad- 
mitted, were from homes rendered 
desolate by the loss of relatives in 
the European war. It is stated that 
the war is the leading cause of in- 
sanity, during the period referred 
to. 

The International Motors Com- 
pany of Allentown, Pa., has estab- 
lished the eight-hour day. Several 
weeks ago machinists at this plant 
struck for shorter hours and de- 
manded that the company put in 
force the same workday prevailing at 
its plant in Plainfield, N. J. The 
strike was called off with this under- 
standing. 

United States Senator Robert M. 
La Follette and Governor Emanuel 
L. Philipp, conservative Republican, 
were both renominated, according 
to returns from Wisconsin's primary 
election held on September 5. A 
very light vote was polled. La Fol- 
lette has a very substantial lead over 
Malcolm G. Jeffries, conservative 
Republican. 

The American members of the in- 
ternational commission to settle dif- 
ferences with Mexico were an- 
nounced on August 22 by Secretary 
of State Lansing. They are Franklin 
K. Lane, ex-Judge George Gray of 
Delaware, and Dr. John R. Mott of 
New York City. They will meet at 
sonic place, still to be selected, with 
three Mexican commissioners. 

The Administration emergency rev- 
enue bill, designed to raise $205,000,- 

000 annually from taxes on in- 
heritances and war munitions and 
from increases in the income tax, 
creating a tariff commission, estab- 
lishing a protective tariff on dye- 
stuffs, providing for protection of 
American firms from "dumping" at 
the end of the war, and giving the 
President authority to take drastic 
retaliatory steps against allied inter- 
ference with American trade, was 
passed by the Senate, 42 to 16. Five 
Republican Senators, Cummins, Ken- 
yon, La Follette, Norn's and Clapp 
voted for the bill. There were no 

1 temocratic nays. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Domestic and Naval 



The two-masted schooner "Georgi- 
etta" has been sold to Manuel De 
Sousa and will be used as a packet 
between New Bedford and the 
Azores. 

The United States torpedo boat 
destroyer "Davis" was launched at 
Bath, Me., August 15. She will have 
a normal displacement of 1075 tons, 
a crew of 103 men and 30 knots' 
speed. 

The steamer "Mary Chilton," built 
by William McKic at East Boston, 
was given her official trip August 
17. She is 205 feet long on water 
line and 215 feet overall. She cost 
about $235,000. 

Captain J. M. Scott, of Mobile, has 
purchased the four masted schooner 
"Salem" (698 tons). The vessel will 
be operated in the Cuban and South 
and Central American lumber trade. 
She has a carrying capacity of 1500 
tons, and was built in San Francisco 
in 1902. 

The three-masted schooner "Mys- 
tic," formerly the "Hope Haynes," 
built at Wiscasset in 1880 and rebuilt 
at Mystic, Conn., in 1908, has been 
sold to Captain Mueller and will 
load a general cargo at this port for 
Cape Verde Islands. The price paid 
for the vessel was about $12,000. 

Judge Kenesaw M. Landis, of the 
United States Court at Chicago, has 
entered a temporary restraining 
order preventing the Great Lakes and 
St. Lawrence Transportation Com- 
pany from selling nine of its fleet 
of ships to the French government. 
The order was granted on motion 
of the Scranton Coal Company, of 
Scranton, Pennsylvania, which also 
seeks a permanent injunction against 
the sale of the ships. The coal com- 
pany alleged that it has a three- 
year contract with the transportation 
company, beginning last spring, by 
which the boat company agreed to 
use its vessels to ship 400,000 tons of 
coal annually to Duluth, Chicago and 
Milwaukee. 

There has never been a time when 
so many men were employed at 
United States navy yards as now, 
and the new building program will 
make it necessary to increase the 
number of skilled workmen. The 
number of employes in July, 1916, 
was 24,383, as compared with 16,898 
on June 1, 1913, before the new 
policy of building ships and making 
over material in navy yards was 
adopted. The total daily pay roll as 
of June 1, 1913, was $46,027.35, as 
against $73,091.12, the total daily pay 
roll as of July 1, 1916. The average 
daily wage prior to June, 1913, was 
$2,723, while the average daily wage 
of July, 1916, was $2,997, an average 
increase per day of wages of 27.4 
cents per day. 

The Russian barque "Avio" and 
schooner "J. E. Du Bignon," which 
were wrecked at Pensacola during 
the hurricane of July 5, will be 
brought to Mobile and converted into 
barges. Ship repair jobs amounting 
to nearly $300,000 have been awarded 
Mobile concerns since July, accord- 
ing to a conservative estimate. Most 
of the jobs were obtained in com- 
petition with firms in the very port 
that the damaged vessels were. 
Bidders from Texas, Louisiana and 
Florida concerns were represented in 
each case. Both the Gulf Dry Docks 
and the Ollinger & Bruce Docks, as 
well as almost every iron foundry 
and boiler works, will be busy for 
many months. The same firms are 
also bidding on additional jobs. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 



THE GERMAN BANK 
Incorporated 1868 



Commercial 



Savings 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. Corner Haight and Belvedere. 



June 30th, 1916 
Assets - 

Deposits ------ 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 

Employees' Pension Fund - 

Number of Depositors . - - - 



$63,811,228.81 

60,727,194.92 

2,084,033.89 

222,725.43 

68,062 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
1'ost Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Kargar, F. 
Alnahamsen, Berner Anderson, J. C. -1552 | Karlson, Karl 



Johannesen, J. Johnson, John 

Johannessen, A. Johnson, Ule 

-1487 Johnson, Pete 

Johannessen, C. J. Johnson, N. 

Johansen, August Johnson, Sam 
Johansen, Fritz 



Johansen, Harry 
Johnson, Elees 
Johnson, Ernst 
Johnson, I. 

Kaaslck, August 
Kaktin, Ed. 



Johnson, Sigurd 
Johnsson, C. A. 

-■Mil 
Jorgensen, Robert 
Juliusson, C. A. 

Knudsen, Conrad 
Knut, Alex 



Abrahamason, W. 

Alii, Kinar T. 

Aho, J no. 

Aliokas, Ilmarl 

Albertsky, Fritz 

Alexanderson, Paul 

Alksen, Charlie 

Andersen, C. -1716 Andersson, J. A, 

Andersen, Edward Andersson, S. A. 



Anderson, O. -13t»3 
Anderson, Ole 
Anderson, Gustav 

W. 
Andersson, Erick 

-1781 
Anaersson, G. -1229 



Andersen, George 

Anderson, C. F. 

Anderson, Ernst 

Anderson, F. 

Anderson, F. -332 Aultomen, C 

Anderson, F. -1413 



Apple, August 
Anis, Tobias 
Arndt, Paul 
Asterman, Oscar 
A. 



Backstrom, Folke 
Bang, Mauritz 
Baumelster, John 
Beanan, Edw. 
Bengtsson, John 
Berner, Albert 
Berntsen, Julius 
Bertelsen, B. J. 



Blum, M. B. 
Bock, James 
Bohm, August -1421 
Boisen, J. -911 
Bolin, Charley 
Bah ha, Komola 
Brenen, Wm. 
Brown, George 



Bertelson, O. -2184 Buchanan, L. 



Bessesen, Olaf 
Bey, O. -2248 
Billstein, Karl 
Bjorkholm, A. M. 
Bjork, Rudolf 

Carey, A. L. 
Carlsen, Frank 
Carlsen, Hans 
Carlson, Alex 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Carlsson, Gustav. 
Carlsson, T. P. 
Carroll, John J. 
Carter, Sidney 
Cassberg, Gustaf 



Buckley, William 
Bullock, Andrew 
Buse, Alfred 
Bushman, John 

Christensen, Erling 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Louis 
Christensen, Tony 
Christensen, Viggo 
Christiansen, L. P. 
Christiansen, N. 

-1093 
Christison, Peter 
Chris toffersen. Alb. 



Cateches, Constan- Clausen, Ingeman 



Conolly, Obirt 
Cook, Harry 
Crosby, J. 
Crosiglia, Guiseppe 

De Klerk, D. -926 
De Roos, J. 
De Vries, Albertus 
Diez, Th. Harry 



tino 
Catt, Fred. 
Cavanagh, J. E. 
Creely, Tom 

liahlstrom, G. 
i 'anielsen, H. 
Danielsen, N. 
Danielsen, Sigurd 
Davis, Frank E. 

Eckhoff, Otto 
Eckstrom, George 
Edgarton, Jack 
Kichler, Karl 
Eklund, John 
Kliason, C. 
Ellis, B. 
Ellison, Sam 
Elricht, Fritz 

Fagerll, Ott. 

Fagerstrom, Oscar Fredriksen, F. M. 

Falconer, Joseph Fredrikson, H. 



Engstrom, Edward 
Ericson, Arthur 
Ericsson, M. F. A. 
Krikkila, Vilho 
Erikson, J. Edward 
Erikson, Neils 
Evans, David 
Evensen, Louis 

Fredholm, C. J. 



Fisher, Arthur 
Fjellman, Georg 
Foss, Laurits 
Franke, C. 

Gabrlelsen, Elling 
Gansor, Joe 
Gasch, Willi 
Gaupseth, Sigurd 



Fricke, W. 
Fritsch, Leonard 
Fugelutsen, Th. 
Furth, Richard 

Gregg, O. F. 
Grenne, O. 
Griel, Ben 
Gudmundsen, B. 



Gran, Akset -1116 Gulbransen, Bjorn 
Granberg, Fred Gundersen. Jacob 

Granstrom, Nestor Gunther, R. -756 



Grant, David 
Graugaard, L. J. 
Gregersen, John 

Hagman, Jaik 
Hallowes, L. N. 
Hannus, Alex 
Hannus, M. 
Hansen, Carl 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, H. M. 
Hansen, Viggo 
Hansen, W. H. 
Hansen, W. H. C. 
Hansen, William 
Hansen, Marlus 



Gustafson, Axel 
Gutman, Paul 

Hedenskog, John 
Hein, M. 
Hellsten, A. H. 
Hellsten, G. -2168 
Henriksen, Charles 
Herlitz. Knud 
Hetherington, A. T. 
Hetman, Walter 
Hole, Sigvald 
Holm, Carl 
Holmstrom, David 
Holsen, Henry 



Hansen, M. -968 Housten, Robert 

Hansen, Nikolav Hubertz, Emll 

Hanson, C. -967 Hunter, G. H. 

Hanson, Charlie Huotarl, J. 

Hartog, J. 



Isaacson, George 
Isaacson, Gustav 

Jacobs, Aug. 
Jackisch, Magnus 
Jacobsen, Alfred 
Jacobsen, G. E. 
Jacobsen, Hj. 
Jakobsen, Jakob 
Jacobsen, J. 
Jacobs, Fred 
Jacobson, Carl 
Jacobson, Karl 
Jade, H. 



Isberg, Wicktor 
Israelsen, Isak 

.Tohanson, N. A. -280 
Johanson, C. -2407 
Johanson, J. -880 
Johansson, Bernard 
Johansson, J. R. 
Johansson, Carl 
Johansson, W. 
Johnsen, Jakob 
Johnsen, Walter 
Johnson, C. -1300 
Johnson, Carl 



Jakobsen, Valdemar Johnson, Dick 



Jansson, F. J. 
Jenkin, Fred 
Jenkin, George 
Jensen, C. -2318 
Jensen, Hans P. 
Jensen, N. O. 
Johansen, Louis 
Johanson, J. 



Johnson, Evert 
Johnson, Louis 
Johnson. Nathaniel 
Jensen, Henry 
Jensen, John F. 
Jensen, L E. 
Johannesen, Helge 
Johanesen, Hans 



Kalberg, VV. -688 Korsuerg, Walmar 
Kallberg, Arvid Koster, E. 

Kretschmann, S. M. 

Kristensen, D. K. 

Krolt, George 
-llOOKroon, P. 

Kruit, Alex 



Kar.sten, Hugo 

Kaspersen, H. 

Kelly, Patrick 
Klrppin, Mattl 

Kjell, John 
Klattenholt', Hans 
Kn;i|i]ie, Adolph 
Knell, Alex 

Lake, Andy F. 
Lala, Joe 
Larsen, H. -1677 
Larsen, Johannes 
Larson, Edward 
Lato, Edvard 
Law, John 
Leelkaln, M. 
Lemberg, A. 
Leroen, Lars 
Lewis, Peter 
Liholm, Gustav 
Lir.dahn, A. 
Lindenau, E. 
Lindholm, Nels 
Lind, W. 

Madsen, Ludvig 
iVlaas, R. A. 
Maata, John 
Mack, Edward 
Macker, David 
Madsen, Georg 
Maki, Iver 
Mailer, Hilding 
.Mangold, A. H. 
Mansheld, Harry 



Kuger, Gustav 
Kunlrnan, L. 
Kuhn, John 
Kustel, Victor J. 
Kvalvik, Oscar 

Lindberg, A. J. 
Ltndh, N. V. 
Lindroth, Carl 
Link, A. 

Ljungberg, Karl H. 
Lonngren, Karl 
Louerg, Bror 
Lulsten, Chas. 
Lundberg, Lorsten 
Lund, Peter 
Lunstedt, Chris. 
Luitin, Paul 
Lutten, Theodore 
Lutzen, Walter 
Lynch, James 

Mathieson, Ludvig 
Matson, H. 
.Mayers, Paul M. 
Ill i 'inn, J. C. 
McCusken, John 
McGlaslan, W. T. 
Mi .Manus, P. 
Melander, G. L. 
Meller, Hans 
Melson, William 



Maiuisun, A. -1338 Mersman, A. 
Markmann, Heinr. Meyerdierk, H. 
Markmann, M. -1079Mlller, Chris 
Markus, Bernhardt Mogensen, C. 
Martensen, J. C. Moonan, Thomas 



2191 
Martensen, O. 
Mathews, R. 
Mathison, Einar 
Mathsen, Lewis 
Martinez, A. 
Martln, H. 

Nelen, Alf 
Nelson, Andy 
Nelson, Carl C. 
Nelson, N. R. 



Monsen, C. 
Morris, O. R. 
Mulligan, Edward 
Murphy, Geo. 
Myerhoj, P. 
Myrhoj, J. P. 



Nilsen, Jens 

Nilsen, N. E. 

Nllsen, Nils E. 

Nilsen, Oskar 



609 



Nelsson, N. E. -552 N'ilsson, Reinhold 
Nerby, Kristian Nor, Niels P. 



Neuman, John 
Nicholson, Otto 
Nielsen, Harold 
Nielsen, Hugo 
Nielson, H. J. 
Nikander, Einar 
Nilsen, Hans 
Nilsen, H. L. 



North, N. P. 
Nowak, Andy 
Nurm, John A. 
Nutsen, Gus 
Nygren, Gus 
Nyman, Oskar 



Oberg, Mauritz 
Oberg, S. 
Olausen, Elias 
Olsen, A. -1303 
Olsen, Adrian 
Olsen, Albert 
Olsen, C. 
Olsen, C. A. 
Olsen, Hans 
Olsen, Harry 



Olsen, L E. 
Olsen, O. J. -1020 
Olsen, O. P. -1141 
Olsen, Oskar 
Olsen, O. I. 
Olson, Frank 
1315 Olson, Oscar 
Olson, Otto 
Opderbeck, Eugen 
Oseberg, Anskar 



Osolin, Oscar 

Osterhoff, H. 

1222 Overwick, Thomas 



Peterson, F. 
Peterson, P. M. 
Petersson, Robert 
Petersson, Robert T. 
Pettersen, HJalmar 
Petterson. A. -16T2 
Petterson, Einar 



Olsen, Herman 
Olsen, J. 
Olsen, John 
Olsen, John 

Palken, G. 
Palmqulst, Albert 
Palquist, Albert 
Parsons, Herman 
Paulsen, James 
Paulsen, O. E. 
Pcjirson A. 

Pedersen, Paul -896 Peters, Martin 
Pederson, Charly Peters, M. -1713 
Pedersen, H. -1263 Pettersen, F. -1526 
Pedersen, H. S. Phillips, J. W. 

Pedersen, Krist Piemann, E. 

Pedersen, Kristian Plate, Dledrick 
Pekman, E. Pool, M. 

Petersen, A. -1675 Post, Albert 
Petersen, Christian Post, W. S. 
Peterson, A. Pottage, C. E. 

Petersen, Aage Priehn, A. 

Petersen, Bjorne Prien, Alfred 
Peterson, Chas. 



Qunilan, Thos. 

Rahl, Willy Ringdal, R. T. 

Kainstad, Andreas Rinkel, H. 

Kandropp, John Risgaard, Soren 

Rasmuaen, Emil Hoalsen, Fred 

RasmuBsen, J. -446 Robertson, A. 

Ua.Miiussen, Paul Roden, Knut 

Rasmussen, S. A. Rod, Sakarlas 

Reddinger, Mike Rogirson, Peter 

Keinke, H. Roos, Bert 

Ries, Heinrich Rosberg, N. 

Reinhardt, Werner Roster, Hugo 

Keinnold, Ernst Rundqvist, Oskar 

Renwall, Auselm Runge, Charlie 

Richard, Fred Rutsid, Fred 

Riesbeck, H. -1152 Ryan, Patrick 



Saaii, A. 

Saarlnen, Henning 
Saarlnen, Konsti 

Sauiuclsun, 1. 
Sandholm, Konrad 
Sandqvist. W. V. 
Sarin, C. 
Schager, Ernst 
Schlachte, Alfred 
Schliemann, F. 
Schmidt, Louis 
Schneider, Harry 
Schneider, E. 
Schutt, W. 
Schultz, Fred 
Schwarzien, Wil- 
helm 

t, Johannes 
Seiffert, L. 
Seland, A. 

Selenlus, HJ. 
Semseter, Paul 
Sievers, G. P. 

Sillen, Georg. 

Simonsen, Oskar 

Sjogren, E. 

Talken, G. 

Tamlsar, P. 

Tammola, Vaino 

Taube, August 

Tellefssen, A. E. 

Tennyson, F. 

Thiessen, H. 

Tho, John 

Thompson, G. E. 

I'.lekull, C. 

I :ila, Charly 

Valfre, George 

Varnsquist, Ernst 

Vi i kenstedt, Wil- 
liam 

Vesgaard, Jens 

Wackrum, John 

Wallgren, I. M. 
-1314 

Walters, H. J. 

Walter, J. 

Wapper, John 

Warier, Harold 
ii, J. 

Werth, Gus 

lard, Jens 



Skellerup, Akel 
Sloman, Harry 
Smedsvig, O. B. 
Smith, J. F. 
Smith, Max 
Smith, Wm. 
Snellman, Tor. 
Soderberg, C. 
Soderlund, Uno 
Sorensen, Chris. 
Sorensen, C. -1664 
Sorensen, Viggo 
Spooner, Emil 
Sprogoe, Theodore 
Stanton, W. 
St. Clair, Thomas 
Stohr, Erick. C. 
Strand, Alfred 
Strand, Louis 
Strandquist, Louis 
Slrasdin, Paul 
Svenson, G. A. 
Svensson, Aug. 
Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Swanson, C. -1050 

Thompson, Peter 
Thompson, T. 
Thorstensen, B. 
Tonissen, P. -1009 
Topel, F. E. 
Torstenson, Folk 
Trondhjem, F. O. 
Tuck, Wm. 
Twede, J. 
Ulricks, Critian 

Vestvlk, Ingolf 
Virtonen, Chas. 
Van Frank, W. A. 
269 

Williams, J. F. 
Williams, William 
Wills, George 
Wilson, George 
Winther. Haakon 
Winther, Hakon II. 
Wirak, A. 
Wischoropp, Fritz 
Wittenberg, Albert 
Wold, Theodore 



Westerlund, Albert Wyllie, Jas. 

Werner, Chas. J. 

Werner, W. E. 

Wikstrom, Anton 

Wikstrom, Carl 

Wilhelm, E. 

Williams, Fred J 

PACKAGES. 
Berling, J. B. Mathisen. II. 

Christensen, L. Olsen, Carl 

Conolly, O. Olsen, H. C. 

Gjesdal, Elling Olsen, O. J. 

Gunvaldsen, Ingvald Olsson, James 



Zazan, George 
Ziehr, Ernst 
Zeritt, John R. 
Zickermann, Hugo 
Zunk, Bruno 



-1759 
1101 



-1020 



Jansson, A. L. 
Jensen, Henry 

Kappla, Arthur 
Larsen, Sigurd 
Lindh, Wm. 
Lornsen, Crist 
Lundquist, Frank 



Osterholm, J. W. 
Opderbeck, Eugen 
Ramstad, Andreas 
Rarly, Frans 
Schlacht, Alfred 
Snellman, Tor 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 
Res., Park 6950 

Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 

Saturdays 9 a. in. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 
Continental Building, on Second Floor 
San Francisco, Cal. 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

•Nuf Sed 



J. MILLER 

124 EAST STREET Garfield 690 

Union Store 

HATS, CAPS, 

FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

Suits Steam Cleaned, $1.50 



White Palace Shoe Store 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market, 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest 
Machinery. :: Work Called For and Delivered. 

WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



IS 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 
Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 36 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week, with all modern 
conveniences. Free Hot and Cold Shower 
Bath on every floor. Elevator Service. 
AXEL, LUNDGREN, Manager 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up, $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Garfield 833 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished Up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: 25, 30 and 
50 cts. per Day. $1.25 per Week and Up. 
Free Baths — Large Reading Room 
1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cat. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 
Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



J0RTALLBR0S.EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN ® NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



16 FOLSOM STREET 

HOOKS 

Lumber, Crates, Rice, Sugar for all 
kinds of Stevedore Work. 

J. MAHER 



HULTEN $ RUDOLPH 



Formerly Cutter 
for Tom Williams 



Formerly Tailor 
for Tom Williams 

TAILORS 

SUITS TO ORDER 

CLEANING and PRESSING 

39 Sacramento Street Near Market 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Edward Beahan, a native of Cali- 
fornia, supposed to be sailing on the 
Lakes, is inquired for by his brother, 
J. J. Beahan, 2003 Chestnut street, 
Oakland, Cal. 5-10-16 

Eugene Martin, age 25, 6 feet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired for by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin, 4231 15 N. E., Seattle, 
Wash. 1-27-15 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 



CLASSY CLOTHIER 
HATTER AND FURNISHER 
DOUGLAS SHOES 
UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 




PHONE DOUGLAS 1082 
139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Merchant and Washington 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 




ssued by Authorityoi the Cigar Makers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars 

ShiS (EpVfif IPS lhat the Citjirs contained Inlhll bo» m been made by a 1 llSt'CliSS Wotan, 
aMtM&ftOf IHE CIGAR MAKERS'INICRNAIIONM UNION o< America, an orgam2>tron devotet) tolhead 
vdnctment of tne MOPAl MAURlAUnd INIUUCIUAI iVUIARt Of TXf CBAn, Thenrtorewe recommend 
Inese Cigars to all smokers throughout the world 



f }l( (£U46u*4. Pnndenl, 
* CUf/t/oi 



>/ America 




The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Seaberg, No. 2890, a native 
of Russia, age 30, and a member of 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, is 
inquired for by his wife. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. H. Seaberg, Gen. Del., Sac- 
ramento, Cal. 8-30-16 

Will John Baumeister, member of 
the Sailors' Union, will call at the 
office and receive a letter waiting for 
him there. 



They Are Never Satisfied. — "What 
is the cause of social unrest?" 

"The desire," replied Mr. Dustin 
Stax, "of the workingman for leisure 
and of the leisurely man for some- 
thing to keep him busy." — Washing- 
ton Star. 



The Limit. — We girls had hard- 
ships when we camped out. Only 
one drinking-glass among five girls. 

Horrors! 

And only one mirror. 

Good-night! — Louisville Courier- 
Journal. 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Resources. .$7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Ginty 

S. Bissinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozio Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Plchon 



PRACTICAL NAVIGATION 

Taught by a practical Navigator. Only 
a limited numbec of students will be 
accepted, as the teaching will be indi- 
vidual. For rates and other information 
Address, 

H. HEINKE 

NAVIGATION INSTRUCTOR 
Spain and 2d Streets Sonoma, Cal. 



In War Time. — "Why is it we 
don't hear any more complaints 
about defective life-preservers on 
ships?" 

"Nobody has time to put them on." 
—Judge. 



Some Satisfaction. — Miss Green — 
Of course, you can't believe every- 
thing you hear. 

Miss Gadleigh — Oh, no; but you 
can repeat it. — Boston Transcript. 



Ach, Louis! — I'm afraid these Louis 

XV. heels are much too high for 

me. Perhaps you have lower ones — 

) say about Louis X. would do, I 

think. — London Opinion. 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 

Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 
and 

17 STEUART STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



An agreement between Sweden and 
Russia for linking the railway sys- 
tems of the countries by bridging 
the River Tornea, which forms part 
of the boundary between Sweden 
and Russia, has just been ratified. 
The passenger connection between 
Santo Domingo with the neighbor- 
ing Republic of Hayti is so bad, that 
there have been cases in the last few 
months where persons were obliged 
to travel to Hayti by way of New 
York. 

In reply to a question Lord Robert 
Cecil stated in the House of Com- 
mons that so far as was known the 
number of enemy vessels seized in 
British ports since the beginning of 
the war was 144, in French ports 12, 
in Russian ports 30, and in Italian 
ports 59. Those seized in British and 
Italian ports were all in employment, 
but there is no precise information 
as regards the number employed by 
the French and Russian governments. 

Democracy seems to have more ad- 
vocates in the Danish Folkething 
than in the United States Senate. 
A press dispatch in the daily papers 
said that the question of annexation 
of the three Danish West India 
islands had been submitted to a vote 
of the islands and carried, before 
the treaty with this country was 
signed. And now the Folkething in- 
sists on a vote of the Danish people 
before it agrees to the transfer. But 
the American people have been given 
no such opportunity to express them- 
selves. 

Greece was the center of inter- 
est and the subject of many rumors 
during the past week. As a result 
of the entry of Rumania into the 
war it was rumored that King Con- 
stantine was disposed to reconsider 
the Greek policy, and that a declara- 
tion against Bulgaria was imminent. 
Later it was said that the monarch 
congratulated those of his officers 
who had refused to join the revolu- 
tionary party at Saloniki, and still 
later that Greece was in a dilemma 
because Germany was insisting on 
the same concessions that have been 
granted to the allies. 

During the week whatever changes 
were made in France were in favor 
of the allies. The Crown Prince was 
said to have given up a section of 
his Verdun line and to have been 
placed more than ever on the defen- 
sive. On the Somme the French 
made progress east of Forest, carried 
the village of Soyecourt and a part 
of Vermandovilliers, and in two days 
took over 5000 prisoners. Berlin ac- 
knowledged that the town of Clery, 
three and a half miles northwest of 
Peronne, was lost to the French, and 
the British claimed an advance on a 
three-mile front, in the course of 
which Ginchy was taken from the 
Germans. The allies' drive is still 
on, but there was talk of beginning 
to dig in for the winter, and less 
was heard of the end being in 
sight. In point of actual fighting, the 
most exciting areas were In the 
Balkans, where Roumania made sub- 
stantial gains in one direction against 
Austria, but lost heavily in another. 
On the Black Sea coast the Bul- 
garians made great progress into 
their neighbors' territory, and It is 
estimated that 20,000 Rumanians 
were taken prisoners when Bulgarian 
and German forces captured the 
fortress of Turtukai. On the other 
hand, Vienna admitted an Austrian 
withdrawal south of Dorna Watra. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits. 



Time's Changes. — "You and your 
sister are twins, are you not?" 

"We were in childhood. Now, 
however, she is five years younger 
than I."— Puck. 



You 



Unusual Behavior. — Lerret 
look worried, old chap. 

Yadilloh — Yes; I'm afraid my wife 
is sick. She stayed at home all yes- 
terday afternoon. — Life. 



Prepared. — The Plumber — Take it 
fmm me, Joe, them that doesn't be- 
lieve in preparedness ain't no good 
on earth. By the way, ye'll have 
to go back to the shop for a monkey- 
wrench and the soldering outfit. — 
Judge. 



Better Authority. — It was Shake- 
speare, wasn't it, who said, "Sweet 
are the uses of adversity"? 

Shakespeare may have said it 
originally, but I heard it from a 
lawyer who had pocketed 65 per 
cent, of an estate. — Boston Tran- 
script. 



Stripes. — "Look at 'em!" exclaimed 
the burglar. 

"Look at what?" asked the pocket- 
book-snatcher. 

"Them black an' white stripes 
that's all the style! I kin remember 
when they put 'em on us we thought 
we was disgraced!" — Washington 
Star. 



Unanimous. — "Now, children," said 
the teacher, "I have been talking 
about cultivating a kindly disposition, 
and I will now tell you a little 
story. Henry had a nice little dog, 
gentle as a lamb. He would not 
bark at the passers-by or at strange 
dogs, and would never bite. Wil- 
liam's dog, on the contrary, was al- 
ways fighting other dogs, or flying 
at the hens and cats, and several 
times he seized a cow. He barked 
at strangers. Now, boys, which dog 
would you like to own — Henry's or 
William's?" 

The answer came instantly, in one 
eager shout, "William's!" — Every- 
body's Magazine. 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts In the 
name of two individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Did you ever stop to think that 
there is from one-half to one ounce 
more Tobacco in the 10c Pouches 
GOLD SHORE CUT PLUG 
SMOKING than in the advertised 
10c tins, and not any better Tobacco 
grows than the BAGLEY CO. put 
in GOLD SHORE. Why buy tin 
cans to throw away, when the pouch 
is so much more practical as a pocket 
package, and contains more Tobacco? 



UNIOIV 




MADE 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man. and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




Union Label of the 
UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are 
counterfeits. 

JOHN W. SCULLEY, President MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary-Treasurer 

Rooms 72-73 Bible House, New York City 




STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 
NOTICE! BOSS OF ROAD 
OVERALLS— PRICE, 80 CENTS 

Phone Douglas 1737 



Demand the Union Label 



Christensen's Navigation School 

Established 1906 
ENTRANCE AT 25 CALIFORNIA AND ^MARKET STS." 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 




WE HAVE NO BRANCH STORES-ONLY ONE^kTstT^ 
Watch Repairing Guaranteed Two Years 

The Popular Price Jewelry Store 

715 MARKET STREET Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 




Jewelers, Watchmakers and 



James Ji.Sorensert. flfltirianc 

Everything Bought or Repaired at Our Store is Positively Guaranteed 




S*0*2j 




t*o*gj 



Upholding American 
PROSPERITY 



^f* 




The key to Prosperity is Saving! 
So make up your mind to prosper 
by buying one of Hale's $1.00 Banks 
for only 50c. It is the best possible 
way to teach the children thrift and 
the vital principles of saving. We 
keep the key, and you can only open 
the Bank by bringing it to Hale's. 
Do what you wish with the money. 
Banks on Sale at Tranrfer Desk. 




Market at Fifth 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 

in 4 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



H. SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 

FURNISHING GOODS 

693 THIRD STREET, San Francisco 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BCD SEAL CKAB CO., MANUrACTUBEBS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



"YOUR HATTER" 
FRED AMMANN 



72 MarKet Street 
San Francisco 

Union Hats 



OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

ARGONAUT SHIRTS 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXX, No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1916. 



Whole No. 2400. 



SEAMEN'S LAW UPHELD. 

Foreign Seamen May Demand One-Half of Wages Due, When in Port. 



Prior to the enactment of the La Follette 
Seamen's law the statute (R. S. 4530) provided 
that a seaman should be entitled to "one-half 
part of the wages which shall be due him at 
every port where such vessel, after the voyage 
has commenced, shall load or deliver cargo 
before the voyage is ended unless the contrary 
be expressly stipulated in the contract." 

Needless to state, under this law seamen were 
usually required to stipulate "the contrary" — 
that is, to sign a stipulation that "no money 
shall be paid during the voyage except at the 
master's option." In this way the intent of the 
law was entirely defeated. 

No More "Stipulations to the Contrary." 

The new Seamen's law repeats the provision 
that seamen shall be entitled to one-half part of 
their wages at every port of loading or dis- 
charge and declares that "all stipulations in the 
contract to the contrary shall be void." Thus 
the right to one-half of the wages earned at 
every port cannot be signed away. 

The new law also provides that a demand for 
money in port "shall not be made before the 
expiration of, nor oftener than once in five 
days." 

Failure on the part of the master to comply 
with the seaman's demand for one-half of his 
wages "shall release the seaman from his con- 
tract and he (the seaman) shall be entitled to 
full payment of wages earned." 

Notwithstanding any release signed by any 
seaman any court having jurisdiction may set 
aside such release and take such action as 
justice shall require. 

The new Seamen's law applies to seamen on 
foreign vessels in ports of the United States. 
Such seamen may apply to the courts of the 
United States for its enforcement. 

The wages of foreign seamen coming to 
American harbors ranged from $16 to $25, de- 
pending upon at what port in Europe the men 
had signed. If they had signed in India or China 
the wages were from $7 to $9 in gold; if they 
had signed in Japan it ranged around the figures 
of $12.50 in gold. 

If these foreign seamen quit their vessels in 
American ports they were subject to arrest, de- 
tention, and return to the vessel from which 
they had deserted, and this held them down to 
the wages of the port in which they had 
joined the vessel. 

The Equalizing Process. 

The Seamen's Act became operative in foreign 
vessels coming within the jurisdiction of the 
United States partly on March 4 and partly on 
the last day of July, 1916. It had been main- 
tained by all those who have been friendly to 
the passage of the Seamen's Act that when the 
seamen were given the ownership of their own 
bodies and were given the opportunity to assert 
and protect their freedom, there would gradually 
come an equalization of the wages of seamen 
leaving ports of the United States regardless of 
the nationality of the vessel. It was further in- 
sisted that later on there would be an increa&c 
in the seamen's wages in the ports of Europe 
and Asia either to the actual figure of American 
wages or near thereto, and that the treatment 



of the men would be so improved that they 
would be willing to stay by their vessels and 
desertions would decrease instead of increase. 

The facts recently gathered by the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union of America furnish con- 
clusive evidence that the law is already working 
out as was expected. 

As was anticipated, foreign shipowners, and 
their American representatives, have taken 
strenuous exception to the one-half payment of 
wages in American ports. They do not want 
wages equalized. 

Fortunately, the language of this section in the 
Seaman's law leaves little opportunity for hair- 
splitting argument, or other evasion. At any 
rate, the first Federal Court decision upon this 
point has squarely met the issue raised by the 
lawyers for foreign shipowners and upheld the 
new legislation. 

For the information of Seamen everywhere, 
the opinion of the Court is published herewith, 
in full: 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

WESTERN DISTRICT OF WASHINGTON 

NORTHERN DIVISION. 

John A. Clyma, Libelant, v. The Steamship 
"Ixion," her apparel, tackle and furniture, Re- 
spondent. No. 3342. 

Filed July 14, 1916. 

On Exceptions to Libel Exceptions Denied 

Jay C. Allen, of Seattle, Wash., for Libelant. 

Huffcr & Hayden, of Tacoma, Wash., for Re- 
spondent. 

Neterer, District Judge. 

Libelant, a British subject employed as a 
seaman upon a British vessel, states that on the 
20th of May, 1916, he had earned on the voyage 
under his articles of employment, 282 pounds, 
one shilling ($1353.84) upon which had been paid 
264 pounds 7 shillings 4 pence ($1268.96); that 
there was an allotment to be deducted of four 
pounds ($19.20), leaving a balance of 13 pounds 
13 shillings 6 pence ($65.64) due. That the 
vessel, on the 15th day of May, 1916, entered the 
port of Seattle for the purpose of loading and 
delivering cargo, and on the 20th day of May, 
following, while still in port so loading and 
delivering cargo, libelant, acting under Section 
4530 of the Revised Statutes of the United 
States, as amended, "did demand of the master 
of said vessel the payment of one-half of the 
amount of his wages then earned; that the 
libelant had not made a previous demand for 
any wages within five days previous thereto; 
that said payment was refused by said master 
and because of said refusal the libelant did on 
the 22nd day of May, 1916, pursuant to the 
provisions of said act of Congress, demand his 
release from said contract, and did then and 
there demand full payment of the wages which 
he had so earned, which said payment the said 
master did refuse and has continually refused 
since said time," and prays process in due form 
of law according to the course of this court in 
admiralty and maritime jurisdiction, condem- 
nation of the vessel, tackle, etc., to pay the 
claim. 



Exception is filed to the libel in which it is 
contended, among other things, "that it appears 
that the libelant has been paid more than half 
of the wages due him from the time of joining 
said ship to the filing of the libel and does not 
show that the libelant has not been paid more 
than half of the wages due him and was not 
paid more than one-half of the wages due him 
at the time of filing the libel, for any voyage 
upon which he engaged to serve under the 
articles mentioned in the libel." 

It is contended by the claimant that the 
shipping articles entered into by the libelant 
were entered into in a foreign jurisdiction, by a 
foreign vessel and an alien person, and that 
the rights of the parties must be determined by 
the laws of the ship's flag. 

Congress Has Right to Prescribe Rules. 

I think the claims made by the claimant are 
stated too broadly. Congress has the right to 
prescribe rules which shall govern a vessel and 
sailors while within the jurisdiction of the 
United States, and if the libelant has brought 
himself within the provisions of the act of 
Congress referred to, the exceptions must be 
denied. 

Section 4 of Chapter 153, 38 Stat, at Large, 
page 1165 amendatory of Section 4530 Rev. Stat. 
U. S., provides: 

"Every seamen on a vessel of the United 
States shall be entitled to receive on demand 
from the master of the vessel to which he be- 
longs one-half part of the wages which he shall 
have then earned at every port where such 
vessel, after the voyage has been commenced, 
shall load or deliver cargo before the voyage 
is ended, and all stipulations in the contract to 
the contrary shall be void; provided, such a 
demand shall not be made before the expiration 
of nor oftener than once in five days. Any 
failure on the part of the master to comply 
with this demand shall release the seaman from 
his contract and he shall be entitled to full 
payment of wages earned. . . . Provided 

further, that this section shall apply to seamen 
on foreign vessels while in harbor of the 
United States and the courts of the United 
States shall he open to such seamen for its 
enforcement." (Blackface ours.) 

Law Applies to Seamen on Foreign Ships. 

By express provision this act applies to sea- 
men engaged on foreign vessels while in ports 
of the United Stales, and the courts of the 
United States shall be open to enforce such 
claims. It is further contended by the claimant 
tli.it it affirmatively appears upon r-ic face of 
the complaint that advancements have been 
made to seamen which more than pay one-half 
of the wages earned on the voyage to the t 
of demand. I think that Section 10 of the 
Seamen's Act, 30 Stat, at Large, page 763, 
dicates the policy of the Congress with relal 

eamen on United States vessels by making 
it "unlaw fn] in any case to pay any seaman 
wages in advance of the time when he has 
actually earned the same, <"■ to pay such advan 
wages t" any other person." A consideration 
of the provisions of Sections 4530 supra, as 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



tii 'ii w iili Section l' 1 of the 
lush e, in my judg- 
ment, thai the inti i ingress, was that no 
advancements could be made upon wages earned 
on foreign vessels while in the harbors of the 
United States or within the jurisdiction of the 
waters of the United States. The libel showing 

that Wages were earned while in the port ol 

Seattle, demand made within the provisions of 
Section 4530, supra, as amended, and payment 
d, a cause of action is stated, and the 
exceptions must be denied. 

I have conferred with Judge Cushman, and 
am authorized to state that he concurs in the 
conclusion herein. 

(Signed) JEREMIAH XKTERER. 

Judge. 



CONVENTION CALL. 



International Seamen's Union of America. 



To all Unions of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America- 
Greetings : 

The Twentieth Annual Convention of 

the International Seamen's Union will con- 
vene in New York City, Monday, Decem- 
ber 4th, 1916, and will continue in session 
from day to day until its business is com- 
pleted. 

All District Unions are urged to send 
as large a representation as possible. The 
convention will be one of the most im- 
portant ever held. Question- of great im- 
portance to the Seamen will be considered 
and acted upon, and a review of the results 
of the work during the past year under the 
new legislation must be dealt with in order 
that plans for future work can be laid to 
take advantage of the new conditions. 

Unity of action is necessary to properly 
solve the questions confronting" the Sea- 
men. Every District Union should be rep- 
resented by its ablest, most experienced 
and faithful members. Economy should 
not stand in the way of your Union being 
represented. 

Representation. 

The following sections of the Constitu- 
tion of the International Seamen's Union 
of America govern representation at the 
Convention : 

Article IN, Section 2. Representation 
at the Convention shall be based upon the 
average per capita tax paid during the year. 
I (rganizations shall be entitled to one dele- 
gate for two hundred members or more, 
three delegates for five hundred or more 
and one delegate fur each additional five 
hundred or majority fraction thereof. 

Section 3. Affiliated unions shall be en- 
titled to one vote for each one hundred 
members or majority fraction thereof. 
When more than one delegate represents 
.•in organization, the vote of their unions 
shall be equally divided among such dele- 
gates. 

Section 4. Delegates shall have the same 
qualifications as the elected officers of the 
organization represented and shall be 
elected by a general vote of each organiza 
tion provided. No one shall be seated as 
a delegate who is also a member in any 
labor organization not affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America, 
etc. 

Credentials. 

Duplicates of credentials should be 
mailed to the international office not later 
than November 15th, 1916, in order that 
the Committee on Audit and Credentials, 
which meets before the Convention, may 
have ample time to complete its work and 



!>' read} to submit its report when the 
Convention is called to order. 

It is suggested that District Unions oi 

delegates having matters they desire to 
submit to the Convention will do so by for- 
warding copies of resolutions, in duplicate 
form, which they desire to introduce to the 
International's Secretary-Treasurer at least 
one week in advance of the Convention. 
This, for the purpose of facilitating the 
work of the Convention. 

You are respectfully requested to take 
up the matters herein mentioned with your 
union immediately in order that the Con 
vention call may be given earnest con- 
sideration by as large a number of mem- 
bers as possible. With best wishes. I am, 
Fraternally yours. 

T. A. HANSON, 
Secretary -Treasurer. 

Chicago. 111.. Sept. 9. 1916. 



CEMENT ON SHIPS' BOTTOMS. 



Tin' use of cement and sand, particularly 
on ships' bottoms, was first made in single- 
bottom vesseb. where large quantities of 
water collected on the shell owing to 
sweating in the holds, and other causes. 
This liquid was particularly strong in cor- 
rosive action, and to protect the plating it 
was to be thoroughly coated with cement 
and sand. When double bottoms were 
introduced, the foul water collected in the 
bilges at the margin plates, thereby pro- 
tecting the major portion of the bottom 
shell plating. The use of cement and sand 
in the ballast tanks, however, still con- 
tinues in many cases, says "Shipbuilding 
and Shipping Record" (London). It is ap- 
plied very thickly, and in sufficient quan- 
tities to cover the inside st rakes of plating 
and the rivet heads, and also the shell 
flanges of angle bars. The disadvantages 
of such a procedure have now been under- 
stood for some time, although alternative 
methods have not been widely adopted. 
The presence of the cement renders it diffi- 
cult to examine properly the shell plating, 
and it sometimes happens that the steel 
under the cement is very badly corroded, 
although the cement looks quite sound 
The cement has no elasticity and strains 
set up in the plating may easily result in 
the fracture of the cement. These cracks 
may remain unobserved, since they are 
difficult to detect, but water will be ad- 
mitted by them between the cement and 
the plating, resulting in rapid corrosion of 
the steel. Substitutes for cement have 
been found in bituminous cement, cement 
wash and tar compounds, and these render 
the inspection of the plating much easier; 
in some cases these compositions have been 
used with very good results. There is an- 
other, although smaller, objection to the 
use of cement and sand to be found in its 
excessive weight. Tn some vessels it rep- 
resents quite an appreciable item and limits 
the deadweight capacity of the ship. This 
accounts for the use of bituminous and tar 
compositions in shallow-draft vessels; in 
tact, experience in these boats has now 
been sufficiently extensive to show that no 
harm results from their use. 



FURUSETH AT SEATTLE. 



We admire the man who "dares to be in 
the right of two or three," provided his daring 
is not inspired mainly by a desire for no- 
toriety. 



During the past week the Associated I 
service carried a news item from Seattle to 
the effect that Andrew I'uruseth had been 
mobbed, etc. 

The real truth in the matter is, of course. 
an entirely different story. In order to re- 
move any misapprehension that may remain 
anywhere, the JOURNAL herewith reprints the 
tacts in the case as published in the current 
issue of the Seattle Union Record: 

"In a vigorous address on the injunction 
issue, at the last meeting of the Central 
Labor Council, Andrew Furuseth, president 
of the International Seamen's lnion of 
America and father of the Seamen's law. 
characterized the interference of the courts 
of equity with labor disputes as unwarranted 
usurpation and suggested to his hearers that 
it it was necessary to go to jail to establish 
human rights, that other and perhaps better 
men had done it before. 

"Following his address, Furuseth was 
quizzed by a number of members of the 
Longshoremen's Union, who had attended the 
session in great numbers, and defended the 
settlement by the San Francisco longshore- 
men, and claimed the strikers were attempt- 
ing to take certain work away from the 
sailors. This brought on what threatened to 
be a long jurisdictional squabble, which Presi- 
dent Proctor tried to quel! by declaring the 
question closed and calling for the special 
order, which had to do with the presentation 
of medals and sweaters to the leading con- 
testants in the Labor Day sports. 

"In closing the debate, brother Proctor 
ruled off the tloor Cordon J. Kelly, a vice- 
president of the longshoremen, whom he did 
not know. The visiting longshoremen pro- 
tested at this, but quieted down until they 
found the nature of the special order, when 
they expressed their discontent with the pro- 
ceedings by starting to leave the hall. At 
the same time Furuseth left the hall, an- 
nouncing that he had to lake a boat to Vic- 
toria, and some of the longshoremen kidded 
him with being a quitter. This incident was 
eagerly seized upon by the morning paper 
and magnified into a riot and the calling 
of police reserves and a lot of other balder- 
dash. The longshoremen made no threats 
against Furuseth, and their demonstration, if 
such it may be called, was against the Cen- 
tral Labor Council for refusing further to 
consider their jurisdictional grievances with 
the sailors. 

"brother I'uruseth spoke on the injunction 
question from the standpoint of a layman 
rather than that of a lawyer, and his line 
of reasoning met with the approval of prac- 
tically every one present, being applauded 
at frequent intervals. After making striking 
comparisons between human rights and prop- 
erty rights. Brother I'uruseth reached a cli- 
max by stating that if he were in Seattle he 
would give the authorities every opportunity 
to arrest him for violation of any court order 
that took from him his right of free speech, 
whether that be by word of mouth or through 
the press. After stating that all injunction 
was usurpation, he reminded his hearers that 
it was no dbgrace to go to jail, for many of 
the best people in the world had gone there: 
that the disgrace depended not on the place 
you were sent, but why you were sent 
there." 



There is one thing that is stronger than 
armies, and that is an idea whose time has 
come. — Victor Hugo. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Judge Denies Free Speech. 

Five striking union patternmakers of De- 
troit have each been sentenced to IS days 
in jail and $100 fine for contempt of court 
by Judge Van Tile. 

An injunction was issued against these 
workers several weeks ago commanding 
them not to picket or to visit the homes of 
strikebreakers. Tn the case of Business 
Agent Krogstad it was shown that he had 
visited the home of a strikebreaker and 
discussed the strike, after which the latter 
declared the union was right in its fight 
for better working conditions. Krogstad 
was jailed and fined for this disobedience 
of the court's order. In sentencing him. 
Judge Van Tile said : 

"I want you to understand property 
rights must be respected and that men 
cannot interfere with employes of this shop." 

Robert Schram, another striker, was 
found guilty of standing on a corner one 
block from the struck plant. Tie was 
jailed and fined when he told the court 
he would continue to picket, as he was 
acting within his rights. 

President Wilson of the Pattern Makers' 
League of North America is in the city 
aiding the strikers. He said that the courts 
can send every patternmaker in Detroit 
to jail but other patternmakers from every 
city in the country would take their places 
on the picket line. 

The patternmakers' executive said: 

"They may send more of our men to 
jail. But we will continue to send them 
here until they quit sending them to jail. 
There is no statute in the State of Michi- 
gan that denies the right to picket. But 
your State Supreme Court has said so. It 
is not the function of a court to legislate. 
If they who made the constitution of this 
country thought judges proper men to 
legislate, they would not have provided for 
legislators. 

"We are not going to ask Detroit trade 
unionists for one penny of financial sup- 
port. We don't need it. Our members 
pay high dues. We have plenty of money, 
but we want organized workers to give 
their moral support as an argument to 
show why the law of the State of Mich- 
igan should say that judges shall not 
issue injunctions of this kind." 



Another Free Speech Opponent. 

Charles E. Carter, chief of police, Co- 
lumbus, Ohio, has been elected president 
of the Ohio Police Association at its an- 
nual convention. The new president has 
been in the limelight for the past several 
months because of his attempt to check 
free speech and run union organizers out 
of Columbus. 

As president of the State Police. Chief 
Carter would probably accept the influence 
of organized labor in the campaign for a 
State pension for police, which was in- 
dorsed by the convention. Other legisla- 
tion favored is that police chiefs hold their 
jobs for life, that they may be "protected 
from the political highbinders of the cities." 
as one delegate put it. 

In view of Chief Carter's attempt to 
gag free speech it will be interesting to 



note how hard organized labor smashes at 
this plan to give a life tenure to one who 
arrests union officials and holds them in 
his office until after union meetings ad- 
journ. 



In Sherman's Home Town. 

Springfield, 111., is the home of United 
States Senator Sherman, and Editor Wood- 
mansee of the Illinois Tradesman, official 
paper of the Springfield Federation of Labor, 
has this to say of Senator Sherman's attack 
on President (Jumpers: 

"Senator Sherman has been proclaimed 
here in his home town as 'the favorite 
son of Illinois,' but his attack on President 
Gompers, which in reality means an attack 
on the union labor movement, has only 
served to bring him down upon a level 
with the common, evcry-day politician. 

"The labor movement has known Sam- 
uel Gompers too long to allow Sherman 
or any other politician to change their 
minds or in any way interfere with their 
admiration for the great head of the Amer- 
ican labor movement. 

"If Samuel Gompers is 'a public nui- 
sance,' let us have more 'public nuisances' 
and the world will be better for it." 



Immigration Figures. 

The bureau of immigration, federal de- 
partment of labor, reports that 30,967 im- 
migrants were admitted during July of 
this year, against 28,097 during the cor- 
responding month of 1915, and 72,015 dur- 
ing July, 1614. In the latter period Rou- 
mania furnished 246 immigrants, and in 
July, 1916, this number dropped to 10. 
Immigrants from Italy during July, 1914, 
totaled 7503, and in July, 1916, 2948. Dur- 
ing the 1914 period 325 came from Bul- 
garia, Servia and Montenegro, but war 
conditions reduced this number to 53 dur- 
ing July, 1916. 

Of the total number admitted during 
July, 1916, 3633 were classified as laborers 
and 1609 as farm laborers. 

New York received 7826 of these immi- 
grants. Michigan came next with 2464, 
followed by Massachusetts, 2460; Penn- 
sylvania, 1230, and California, 1089. 

Of the southern States, Kentucky re- 
ceived 1; Mississippi, 4; Georgia, 6; Ar- 
kansas, 7; South Carolina, 8, and Ten- 
nessee, 11. 



Judge Hillyer Renominated. 

Renomination of Granby Hillyer for 
judge of the Third Judicial District indi- 
cates that the fight for an untainted ju- 
diciary in Colorado is not yet won. Judge 
Hillyer was formerly attorney for the coal 
operators and was appointed by Governor 
Carlson to his present position, which was 
created by the last Legislature. Judge 
Hillyer heard many of the miners' cases 
but the workers finally secured an order 
from the State Supreme Court debarring 
him from further consideration of these 
cases. 

Judge 1 1 diver's sentence of life imprison- 
ment for John K. I.awson was set aside by 
the State Supreme Court and that unionist 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Ofifices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

f nternationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
1 eiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Rcmandores, Rua 
Rarao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritime dos Emprcgados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road. 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's WorKers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



c. 



CANNON 



The Britisli Board of Trade re- 
ports that the total number of fatal 
accidents to seamen during July, 
1916, was 82, a decrease of 71 on a 
month ago and of 130 on a year 
ago. 

The Otis-Fenson Company of 
Hamilton, Ontario, has granted the 
nine-hour day with increased wages 
to machinists who have been ou 
strike for several weeks. A govern- 
ment commission award was rejected 
by Hamilton employers and their 
machinists struck. The latter are 
forcing the employers to accept the 
decision. 

A summary of the "labor market" 
for July, published in the current 
issue of the British Labor Gazette, 
says that "all the principal indus- 
tries were well employed, and in 
those directly concerned with war 
requirements the pressure was very 
great. The depiction of labor owing 
to further enlistments continued, and 
the need for more women substitutes 
is acutely felt." 

The following is the general con- 
clusion arrived at by the German 
Department of Labor Statistics as to 
the course of employment in Ger- 
many during June: "On the whole 
there was practically no change in 
the state of employment during June. 
Trades engaged in supplying the 
needs of the army and navy con- 
tinued working to their utmost ca- 
pacity. There were certain cases of 
seasonal slackness, such as occur dur- 
ing every summer, but their extent 
was in no way remarkable. As re- 
gards mining and the metal and en- 
gineering trades, no great change 
was reported compared with the 
preceding- month; while in compari- 
son with June, 1915, there were 
many cases of improvement. In the 
chemical trades employment im- 
proved to some extent; but no ap- 
preciable change was on the whole 
experienced in the electrical trades. 
A further decline took place in cer- 
tain branches of the textile trades. 
The clothing trades, on the other 
hand, in many cases reported a con- 
tinuation of fair or good employ- 
ment. Here and there some im- 
provement took place in the building 
trades." 

The Journal of the Central Com- 
mittee for War Industries of Petro- 
grad, in its issue of June 20, 
discussing the great increase of 
women's labor in factories and works 
in Russia since the war, states that 
in the early days of the mobilization 
the engagement of women to fill 
the places of skilled men was re- 
sorted to only by way of experi- 
ment; but work at the various ma- 
chines was found to be so simple 
that in a short time it was possible 
to fill up the shortage with trained 
women-workers. The first women 
fitters were employed in the autumn 
of 1914 at a well-known private- 
works in Petrograd. Then women 
began to be employed at lathes in 
Government workshops, and men 
taken from drilling, planing, milliner 
and other machines were more and 
more frequently replaced by women 
without any complaints being heard 
from the employers as to reduced 
productivity of labor. At the time 
of reporting from four to five times 
as many women were being employed 
in factories and workshops in Petro- 
grad as before the war, the total 
number being estimated to exceed 
50,000. 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON STREETS .... SAN PEDRO 



PHONE 187 J 



HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 

NATIONAL HOTEL 

MRS. ALBERT H. RYAN, Prop. 

FURNISHED ROOMS 
50c Per Day and Up — $2 Per Week and Up 
No. 270 FOURTH STREET SAN PEDRO, 



CAL. 



REMOVAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 



S. G. SWANSON SI BEST 



there 
is In 



TAILORING Fancy Price 



who has been established since 1904 on Beacon Street, between 6th and 7th 

IS NOW located on the 2nd floor BANK OF SAN PEDRO BLDG., 
entrance 110 WEST 6th STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL., 

Where he Is better prepared, because of Much lesser rent, to give the trade the 
advantage of lower prices and as formerly, special care Is given to garments en- 
trusted to him for Cleaning, Repairing and Pressing. 

Note — Clothes also cut, trimmed and made from your own cloth with the 
Union Label too. The new woolens are now ready for your Inspection, how about 
your order? 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



Mills, Elbert a Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 
FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers in — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 



San Francitco. 



Bergman, John Johnsen, Aug. 

Blom, Ernest Konig, D. 

Christiansen, Anton Nielsen, Harold 

Christiansen, A. Olander, Ed 

Doris, Geo. Thomson, John 
Eckart, T. G. 



A SAILOR'S BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

Is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA- FARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, the bank 

carries on hand at all times an ample supply of Swedish, Norwegian 

and Danish SKr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Edstrom, alias Brynjulf Ed- 
strom, born in Norway in 1879, was 
last heard from at Mobile, Ala., 
where his address was Norwegian 
Chapcll, is inquired for. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify his mother. Address, 22 Pile- 
stradet, Kristiania, Norway. — 12-22-15 

George Alexander Sharman, a na- 
tive of Brooklyn, N. Y. About 28 
years of age, height 5 feet 9 inches. 



supposed to have sailed on the Great 
Lakes in 1907, is inquired for by 
M. L. Kinvan, 1211 Mosher street, 
Baltimore, Md. 7-14-15 

George Barrett, who, on November 
12, 1912, left the ship "Port Logan" 
at Newcastle, of which he was an 
apprentice, is inquired for by his 
mother, his father having died. Any- 
one knowing the whereabouts of this 
lost son please at once communi- 
cate with Amelia Barrett, 1 Wood- 
land Place, East Greenwich, Lon- 
don, England. 3-3-15 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Acne, T. Michaelsen. Andrew 
Andersen, John Maurice. Francois 
faldersson, Oskar Muller. Henry- 
nan, Leo McNe&l, John 
Button. Roswell Makela, N. 

. C. Malm, Gustaf 

Hans Nilsen, Nils E. 

Rro, Emll Nilsen, Oskar 

Bentsen, Hans B. Nilsen, Oskar J. 

Bushman, John Olsen, J. P. 

H. Orling, Gust 

Chrlstophersen, C. Owen, Fred 

Carlson, Harry Pedersen, Alt 

Carlson. Oustaf Pelz, Fritz 

Doyle. William Petrow, A. 
Dahlstrom, G. ison. H. -1064 

Edlund. Konrad Pintz, Johan 

Franke, Ohas. Peterson, Hugo 

Fjellman. Jonas Petterson, C. V. 

Fugelutsen. Thor Pakki, Emil 

Fjellman. Karl Pederson, Ole 

Guseck, Bernhard Riekman, Herman 

Glnar, Walter Ryden. Oskar 
Grlgolelt, E. . Victor 

Martin Robertson, A. 

Hedman, John M. Rush, Charlie 

Horlln, Ernest Ries, J. H. 

Henrioksen. H. C. Raun, Elnar 

Hedlund, Olaf Rudd, Walter 

trom. Fritz Sjoblom, G. A. 

Haupt, Fritz Sproeue, Th. 

Hansen. Charley Stenberg. Alfred 

Hansen, Ole Bvenntngsen, S. N. 

Hovei pen. Carl Simpson. L. C. 

■n. I.ars Samuelsson, Frank 

Johanson, John Smith. Johan 

Johnson. Jack Soderlund, Anton 

Janson. Oscar Schmidt, T.ouritz P. 
Johnsson, J. A. -1659Strom. C. L. 

Johanson, Victor Samlblom. Konrad 

Kluff, N. Tborsen, Carl 

jr. nisen, Andrew 

dz'ie, George Ullman, Axel 

Karnup, Erlward T'hlig. Ri. hard 

Kalllo. Anton rjlappa, Kostl 
Lundqulst. Abraham Welsrn. Julius (Reg. 
Laatzen, H. Letter) 

Llndeman. Gust WlBchkar, Ernst 

Lorenz, Bruno Wikman. P. 

Lutzen, Waldemar White, Robert 

Larson. Max Warkkala, John 
Lindherg, Ernst Newspapers and 

Leldeker. Elith Packages. 

Martin, John B. Bchmldt, Laurltz P. 



Honolulu, H. T. 

Anderson, John E. Nelsen. C. F. 

Burk. Harry -1284 Petersen. Carl 

Crantly, C. W. Peters, Walter 

Eugenlo. John Relther, Fritz 

Ekelund, Rickhard Solberg, B. P. 

Tvertsen. Sigvald B. Strand, Conrad 

Lengwenus, W. L. Thompson. Emll N. 
Moller. F. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Carl Fritjof Johansson Lind, age 
39, a native of Sonderborg, Germany, 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify John Lind, 1401 West 9th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 3-24-15 

Anders C. Anderson, a native of 
Norway, who left his personal effects 
at Port San Luis, Cal., after leaving 
a ship at that place, is inquired for. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify D. R. Jacks, Deputy 
Collector of Customs, Port San Luis, 
Cal. 12-22-15 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July, 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St. 8-11-15 

Olai Ingebrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Niels Ingebrigtsen, 
469 — 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 8-4-15 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Peter Murphy, better known as 
Boatswain McGann, will kindly notify 
Patrick Kicran, 58 Commercial St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 4-19-16 

Vencelus Durbich is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please communicate with 
Gerolamo Durbich, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 7-28-15 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen' Journal 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Thomas Crowley of the Crowley Launch and 
Towboat Company has been awarded a contract 
by the Government to lay a water pipe from 
Goat Island to the Oakland long wharf for 
$28,000. 

V. Ford Greaves, in charge of the radio office 
at San Francisco suspended the wireless license 
of Lee Fassett, second operator on the steamer 
"Yale" yesterday for thirty days for being absent 
from his post. 

More cargo was carried through the Canal in 
the month of July, 1916, than in any other 
month of operation except July of 1915; the 
quantity in July of 1915 was 705,469 tons, and 
in July, 1916, it was 648,957 tons. 

A survey made of the steamer "O. M. Clark," 
which collided with the south jetty at the mouth 
of the Columbia river showed considerable 
damage to her sternpost, keel and rudder. The 
vessel has been drydocked and repairs will take 
about ten days. 

Making a profit of nearly 100 per cent, on 
the deal, the Western Fuel Company announced 
the sale of the schooner "Flagstaff" for $210,000 
to an Eastern firm. The "Flagstaff" is of 3500 
tons and is now under the course of construc- 
tion at Dan Hanlon's yards in Oakland creek. 

C. W. Cooke, of the American-Hawaiian 
Steamship Co., who has returned to San Fran- 
cisco after a visit to New York, states that 
upon the arrival of the "Mexican" and "Flori- 
dian" this month, the sugar run will be discon- 
tinued and the vessels probably chartered on 
the Atlantic. Final disposition of the vessels 
is still undecided. 

Hope of immediately floating the "Bear" has 
practically been given up by the salvaging crew, 
according to a late dispatch from Eureka. Those 
engaged in the work of saving the vessel have 
decided to begin protection work. A wood and 
pile wing dam is to be constructed seaward of 
the steamer to keep the sand from washing in 
during the winter. 

The motor-ship "Sierra," building for the E. 
K. Wood Lumber Co., at the Matthews Ship- 
building Co.'s yards, Hoquiam, Wash., was 
launched August 30. The "Sierra" will have a 
lumber-carrying capacity of upwards of 1,700,000 
ft., and is the first motor craft on the Pacific 
Coast used as a lumber carrier. She is fitted 
with twin 320 h. p. motors. 

The steam-schooner "Shna-Yak," which is 
ashore at Pfeiffer's Point, has been moved fifty 
feet more seaward and the steam-schooner 
"Randon," which is ashore at Port Orford, has 
been moved fifteen feet nearer deep water, ac- 
cording to advices received by the marine de- 
partment of the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. The prospects for floating both the ves- 
sels are bright if the weather remains moderate. 

Pilot Alexander Swnnson and Captain F. S. 
Randall of the United States Army transport 
"Crook" have been exonerated from blame for 
the collision between the "Crook" and the Tapa- 
nese steamer "Anyo Maru," on July 20, off Lime 
Point, by United States Inspectors of Steam- 
boats James Guthrie and Joseph Dolan. The 
accident between the two boats occurred during 
a thick foe. Following the collision. Pilot 
Swnnson and Captain Randall were charged with 
negligence and unskilfulness by the inspectors. 

Announcement is made of the intended con- 
struction of a fourth shipyard for wooden vessels 
on property just north of the Columbia Engi- 
neering Works at Willbridge. Ore William H. 
Curtis, a naval architect of Portland, will be 
manager. Contracts were signed August 18 be- 
tween the owners, the Columbia Engineering 
Works, and M. T. Snyder, of New Orleans, for 
the construction of three vessels at a valuation 
of $750 000. Snvder is the owner of the schooner 
"Tune," recently completed at the St. Helens 
shipyards. Work on the ways will be started 
immediately. 

The appointment of W. S. P. Collings of 
Glasgow as exclusive surveyor for Seattle by 
Lloyd's Register of Shipping of London. Eng- 
land, was announced during the week. He will 
superintend the construction of steel stenmshins 
in Seattle and of wooden hull vessels in Seattle, 
other Puget Sound ports, Gravs Harbor, Port- 
land and Victoria and Vancouver. B. C. Four- 
teen steel steamships for classification by Lloyd's 
are under construction or under contract at local 
plants. They aggregate 61.750 tons. Tames 
Fowler, engineer-suryevor for Lloyd's in Seattle 
for manv years, will continue in that capacity. 

The licenses of Edward Litckmann. second 
officer of the steam-schooner "Fair Oaks." and 
Tohn T. Swenson. first officer of the steam- 
schooner "Hardv." were suspended by Inspectors 
of Steamboats Tames Guthrie and Joseph Dolan 
as a result of the collision between the two 
"essels north of Point Reyes on Aiitrust 31. 
Luekmann's ticket was suspended for thirty davs 
and Swenson's for fourteen days. Both the 
officers pleaded guilty to charges of unskilful- 
ness Preferred against them bv the inspectors 
Swenson would have received a thirty days' 
suspension except for the fact that his license 
vims out in fourteen days. 

With 108 panic-stricken passengers crowding 
the forward rail and a fire which belched col- 



umns of smoke from her hatchways, the steamer 
"Beaver" of the San Francisco and Portland 
Steamship Company, bound to San Francisco 
from Portland, raced into port during the past 
week with fire tugs following in her wake. 
Officials of the San Francisco and Portland 
Steamship Company estimated the damage of 
the fire at $75,000. As far as can yet be ascer- 
tained, the hull of the "Beaver" did not suffer 
any damage from the fire. The flames in the 
hold were finally extinguished after the entire 
aft hold had been flooded while the steamer lay 
on the mud banks. 

Protests of San Francisco firms against the 
opening of letters by the British censor have 
been made to Postmaster Fay, and the Chamber 
of Commerce has placed the matter before the 
Secretary of State. The loss of trade secrets 
and their use by the British Government to the 
disadvantage of American trade are held by the 
firms whose letters have been opened to be a 
gross abuse of the censorship. Among the firms 
which have suffered in this way are the Dollar 
Steamship Company and Getz Brothers, while 
the Chamber of Commerce has had a number of 
its letters opened. According to Stanley Dollar, 
the greatest difficulty has been in letters coming 
from the Orient by way of Vancouver, and this 
has caused the local postal authorities to dis- 
continue sending Oriental mail by the Canadian 
line. 

H. W. Brown & Co., of Vancouver, have let 
contracts for the construction of eight 225 ft. 
lumber-carrying vessels, six with the Wallace 
Shipyards, at North Vancouver, B. C, and two 
with Cameron and Genoa Mills (Ltd.), Victoria. 
It is reported that this company will operate 
these vessels when completed, under the name 
of the Canadian West Coast Navigation Co. 
The ships under construction and being planned 
will be built under the terms of the recent 
British Columbia shipping bill, which grants a 
subsidy for 10 years, to be paid in ten annual 
installments not to exceed the sum of $5 per 
ton, to bring the earnings of the ships built 
under the act up to 15 per cent, of the total 
cost. The cost of the vessels will be about 
$165,000 each. They will have a speed of seven 
knots without the use of sails, and an approxi- 
mate lumber capacity of 1,500,000 feet. It is 
estimated that the cargo space on these vessels 
is 95 per cent, of the whole. 

The steamship "Congress" of the Pacific Coast 
Steamship Company's fleet, was burned at sea 
off the Oregon coast, on September 14. The 
"Congress" was on a voyage from San Fran- 
cisco with 259 passengers and a full cargo of 
freight for Seattle and way points. The "Con- 
gress" made a dash for Coos Bay. and accord- 
ing to the latest reports, not a life was lost 
and not a single person was injured in a fire 
at sea which practically destroyed a steel steam- 
ship. Not only is the steamer "Congress" one 
of the newest vessels running out of this port, 
but it is one of the best, costing $1,250,000, and 
at the time of its launching bore the distinction 
of being the largest coastwise passenger carrier 
under the American flag. The vessel was built 
in 1913 by the New York Shipbuilding Company 
especially for the San Francisco-Puget Sound 
run of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. 
The general dimensions of the "Congress" are: 
Length between perpendiculars. 426 feet; length 
over all. 447 feet: beam. 54.9 feet: depth to 
bridge deck, 46 feet. The vessel is of 7900 
gross tons and 4900 net tons, of 7000 horse- 
power, and can be driven by her twin screws at 
an average speed of sixteen knots. 

According to New York advices the Pacific 
Mail Steamship Co. has declared a quarterly divi- 
dend of Wa per cent., pavable September 1 to 
stock on record August 21. In the future a 
semi-annual financial report will be issued. This 
declaration marks the initial dividend on this issue. 
No action on the common is contemplated at pres- 
ent. There are 17,000 shares of Pacific Mail pre- 
ferred outstanding, par $100, and the annual 
dividend requirements at 7 per cent., will amount 
to $119,000. Tt is stipulated that a three years' 
reserve for the preferred must be set up be- 
fore the common can share in dividends. Con- 
sequently $357,000. in addition to the $119,000, 
must be raised before the common can hopeto 
get dividends. But even this renuirement, which 
should strengthen both the preferred and com- 
mon issues, is within easv reach this year, and 
this accounts for the market strength of Pacific 
Mail common, which has sold up to $30 a share, 
equivalent to 600 per cent, of par value, $5. 
Earnings for recent months have not been an- 
nounced, but a statement is to be made for the 
six months ended June 30. It is estimated that 
net earnings are running in excess of $100,000 
a month, or at the minimum rate of $1,200,000 
a year. 

E. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394 (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS- 
FEDERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md WALTER LESCH, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY GUSTAV H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street and 427 West Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

41 Loyalls Lane 

NEWPORT, Va MONS MONSEN, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 
MOBILE, Ala. 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La DAVID F. PERRY, Agent 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WILLY MULLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 
Broad. 
New York Branch, 514 Greenwich St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 228 Lafayette St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON, Mass., iy 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 231 Dock St. 
NEW YORK CITY, 164 Eleventh Ave. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW York CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass., 202 Atlantio Ave. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 328-332 West Randolph St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 365. 

Branches: 

Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

, i Hand, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILOR'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



PAXIL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE 

One year by mail - $2.00 | Six month8 $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco PostofHce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
Maritime Building, 59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the JOURNAL, provided they are of general 
interest, brief, legible, written on one side only of 
the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1916. 



AUSTRALIANS TO INVESTIGATE. 



Another "industrial" investigation, in 
some respects similar to the one recently 
concluded by the Federal Commission on 
Industrial Relations, is shortly to take 
place in America. This time, however, the 
investigators will be citizens of another 
country. 

The Federal Government of Australia 
has decided to send a Commission to 
America to investigate methods of manu- 
facture and conditions of employment. The 
Commission will comprise six manufac- 
turers, six employes' representatives, a jour- 
nalist, and a secretary. 

The central bodies of manufacturers and 
workers in each of the six States have 
been asked to nominate three representa 
tives, from whom the Government will 
select one. The journalist is to be sleeted 
from three nominated by the Australian 
Journalists' Association. The trades have 
been allotted as follows : Iron trades. New 
South Wales: textile trades, Victoria; 
foods. Queensland; leather. South Aus- 
tralia: timber, West Australia: paper, Tas- 
mania. 

At this early stage of the proceedings 
it is decidedly interesting to note that the 
Labor Council in Xew South Wales and 
the Trades Hall Council in Victoria each 
contained strong minorities who were op- 
posed to the nomination of a representative 
on the ground that they believed the Com- 
mission would only return with a report 
on American speeding-up methods. 

The Australian workers have good reason 
to fear the notorious American speeding- 
up system. If it were not for American 
trade-unionism the proponents of "scien- 
tific" or speeding-up methods would long 
ago have reduced the wage earners in this 
country to mere cogs mi the great wheel 
which grinds out profits — and more profits. 

But trade-unionism is ever on the alert 
and has just been able to convince the 
Congress of the United States that the 
infamous and inhuman stop-watch methods 
advocated by twentieth century labor-skinners 



are in direct conflict with the theory upon 

which this Republic is founded. 

\\ e welcome the Australian Commission 
and implore them not to prejudge our fair 
country by the advance agents of those 
benevolent institutions known as the great 
( ? ) \merican "Trusts." 



UNDESIRABLE F( (REIGNERS. 



It is gratifying to note the failure of the 
effort to bring about the deportation of 
George Andreytchine, a Bulgarian, formerly 
employed by the United States Steel Cor- 
poration on the Mesaba iron range of Min- 
nesota. Andreytchine's alleged crime was 
his tireless activity in organizing the miners 
and in helping carrying on the present strike. 
Molding Tolstoy's principles, an effort was 
made to deport him on the ground that he 
is an anarchist. But the United States De- 
partment of Labor finally ruled through its 
solicitor John C. Densmore, that he is not 
a dangerous or undesirable alien under the 
meaning of the law. 

The Committee on Industrial Relations 

comments on the case as follows: 

Andreytchine's release marks the final defeat 
of the Steel Corporation and their agents in and 
out of office in their attempt to destroy Andreyt- 
chine hecause he used his exceptional ability as 
a speaker and linguist on the side of his fellow 
workers, and against the tyranny maintained by 
the Steel Corporation with the aid of gun men 
and subservient officials. Acting Secretary Dens- 
more's decision is a decision against the Steel 
Corporation on a clean-cut issue between that 
corporation and justice. Among the many who 
were active on Andreytchine's behalf were Isaac 
McBride, Senator Harry Lane of Oregon, Frank 
T. Hayes, vice-president of the United Mine 
Workers, and Andrew Furuseth. 

It is a curious and interesting fact that 
all immigrants in America who object to 
low wages and long hours are promptly 
branded as "undesirables." And if immi- 
grants so far forget themselves as to ac- 
tually encourage their fellow workers to 
organize against industrial exploitation they 
are invariably labeled as anarchists. 

It is fortunate, indeed, that the Steel 
Trust docs not control the Department of 
Labor. For in that event most foreign-born 
labor organizers would have been deported 
long ago. 



A MOST PROFITABLE BUSINESS. 



Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo has 
just announced that the United States Bu- 
reau of War Risk Insurance issued 157(1 war 
risk policies from September 2. 1014. the 
date of the establishment of the Bureau, 
to August 23, 1916. These policies cover 
a total amount of $141,415,302 at risk on 
American cargoes and ships carrying non- 
contraband goods all over the world, show- 
ing the great service the Bureau has ren- 
dered American business and American com- 
merce. 

The gross premiums from this insurance 
amounted to S2. (, 50.377, against which the 
known loss amounted to but $771,320. Of 
these losses S5S.N11 has been received in 
salvage. This reduces the net losses to 
$712, 51.x and gives a total of net premiums 
in hand August 2?>. or net profits to th< 
Treasury of $2,237,859. 

It is too bad that this very profitable 
business will end with the war. But sooner 
or later the flay will come when peace risk 
insurance will also be made a function of 
the Government. 

To be sure, there will be mosl strenuous 
opposition to such a "socialistic" proposal. 



1 1 is difficult to see, however, why private 
interests should forever be permitted to 
enrich themselves on marine insurance as 
long as all the people must foot the bills for 
I he building and maintenance of buoys, light 
houses, light vessels, and in fact, for prac- 
tically everything that prevents marine dis- 
asters. 



FIRE < >N THE "CONGRESS." 



Twelve years ago the JOURNAL had occa- 
sion to publish the following editorial com- 
ment : 

When the steamer "Queen," of the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company, was about to sail 
from San Francisco for Puget Sound ports a 
very uncommon event occurred. The occasion 
wis the first sailing of the "Queen" since the 
vessel'9 narrow escape from destruction by fire 
while on the passage up the Coast. The out- 
break was a serious one, and it was only by the 
bborious and courageous efforts of all-hands 
that it was finally subdued. In recognition of 
these efforts, the Company presented each mem- 
ber of the crew, from Captain N. E. Cousins 
down, with a medal inscribed, "For Bravery," 
and also with a sum of money proportioned to 
the personal loss sustained in the fire. This act, 
entirely voluntary on the part of the Company, 
is the more appreciated by reason of the com- 
parative rarity of such recognition. The inci- 
dent reflects great credit upon the management 
of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company, and 
will doubtless bear good fruit in the greater 
tee and respect of its employes. 

During the past week the "Congress." of 
the Pacific Coast Steamship Company's fleet, 
took fire at sea and Captain Cousins, with the 
same type of men in his crew as he had 
twelve years ago, again sticceded in prevent- 
ing a serious marine disaster, and, in fact, 
did bring the burning vessel to port .without 
the loss of a single life. 

Both the "Queen" and the "Congress" car- 
ried full union crews. 

And all news dispatches on hand agree that 
the members of the "Congress" crew behaved 
and acted in a manner just as is expected 
from competent and reliable union seamen. 
Captain ('otisin> himself five's them full and 
unstinted praise. 

This tells t lie story in full. It requires no 
elal 'oration or detailed explanation. "Safety 
at sea" becomes more than an empty phrase 
when the ship's crew is composed of ex- 
perienced and efficient union seamen! 



"G< >OD" AXD "BAD" UNION'S. 



S] leaking before that annex to the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, the Com- 
mercial Club, an imported celebrity named 
Walter Gordon Mcrritt, unbosomed himself, 
as follows : 

Any union that shirks its responsibility under 
the law must go. We must drive out the or- 
ganizations which wotdd lay hands on our free 
institutions. Personally, I believe in unions. 

Hut there are unions and unions — good as well 
as bad. Organized labor must forsake its false 
We need organized labor, but we do 
not need it in the role of a privileged class, 
etc., etc. 

Somehow, in this decade, it has become 
the habit of even plutocratic orator to insist 
that "he personally" believes in unions. All 
they wish to do is to impress upon the 
public the great necessity for rectifying some 
of the union's work ! 

Certainly, if the unions could only be 
persuaded to cease their work of increasing 
want's, decreasing hours and otherwise "dic- 
tating to the employer how he shall run his 
business," the Kosters and the Merritts would 
probably be willing to hail the labor union- 
ists as eminently desirable assets of society. 

Opposed to labor unions? Of course not! 
Perish such thought ' 

Xo one but a madman would proclaim such 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



a policy. And men who raise a million dol- 
lars for the purpose of inducing others to 
stand for the "open shop," while they them- 
selves continue to operate union-shops, can 
not be charged with being madmen. Not 
much ! They are shrewd business men. They 
know something about "false prophets" in 
their own charmed circles. And they very 
much prefer to have open-shop experiments 
conducted in the other fellow's plant. 



INGRATITUDE? 



"Freedom of the Sea," under the auspices 
of his majesty, the king of England, is still 
developing, broadening and branching out. 

On July 4, John Miller, a naturalized 
American citizen of German extraction, was 
forcibly removed from the American steam- 
ship "Frederick Luckenbach," then in the 
Mediterranean, on which vessel he was serving 
in the capacity of second officer. To be 
sure, this is not the first time that Ameri- 
can vessels at sea have been held up and 
relieved of members of their crews. But 
once upon a time it was bitterly resented 
and actually resulted in war. 

The British censorship of mail in transit 
between neutral countries has readied a point 
where the British war minister boldly asserts 
his intention to filch anything he finds in said 
mail for any "national or public use." In- 
cidentally, it may be mentioned that private 
American mail sent from the U. S. of A. 
to an American warship abroad is no longer 
immune from the British censor. Nothing 
that floats, creeps or crawls can escape from 
vicious prying if it comes within his clutches. 

Then we have the British blacklist against 
American merchants who have frankly re- 
sented the assumed dictatorship over all com- 
merce by the Anglo- Japanese world alliance. 
And so on, and so forth. 

Altogether, it would appear as if our dear 
cousin, Johnny Bull, is treating us in a some- 
what unkind manner. But as long as we 
supply him with all he needs in the line of 
supplies and subscribe liberally to his war 
loans — why should he worry? 



On behalf of the organized seamen of 
America the Journal hereby expresses deep 
appreciation to the trade-unionists in the 
State of Washington for retiring Congress- 
man "Chinese" Humphrey to private life. 
This man was perhaps the most bitter and 
unreasonable opponent of humanitarian legis- 
lation at the last few sessions of Congress. 
Still, he had the audacity to aspire for Re- 
publican nomination for United States Sena- 
tor. His overwhelming defeat at the Primary 
is almost as gratifying as the splendid vic- 
tories of La Follette and Johnson in Wis- 
consin and California, respectively. 



The "Queensland Worker" asks this ques- 

tion : 

How long are you going to tolerate a system 
that keeps a few so far from poverty they can 
not see it, while the workers live so close to it 
that they can not see anything else? 

Well, we don't know. Perhaps the law and 
order committee of the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce know. They seem to have 
a ready-made solution for every social and 
economic problem that has ever perplexed 
economists and social reformers. But how 
can we induce them to tell others? 



Good "Union made" tobacco is in the 
market everywhere. It is your duty to refuse 
any other. *■ 



A NOTABLE VINDICATION. 

Secretary of Labor Wilson Investigates and Re- 
ports Upon Immigration Commissioner 
Howe's Splendid Record. 

The industrial relations for millions of Ameri- 
can citizens and workers begin at Ellis Island. 
That is New York's great port of entry for 
immigrants. Through that gateway have poured 
the greatest number of those men and women 
and children from Europe who have peopled this 
great republic, tilled its fields, opened its mines, 
established its factories and made them pro- 
ductive, made its laws, elected its public ser- 
vants, and created here a nation distinctive and 
great in its achievements and more distinctive 
and great in its promises. 

To have charge at this gateway and to safe- 
guard the rights of the people already here and 
to safeguard in equal measure the rights and in- 
terests of the new workers and citizens and 
their families, President Wilson appointed 
Frederic C. Howe. It was one of those ap- 
pointments, like the appointment of Louis D. 
Brandeis to the Supreme Court, that was hailed 
everywhere among the plain people as a pledge 
that the administration intended a government 
of the right kind of men to carry on a govern- 
ment of the right kind of laws. Among all in- 
formed and forward-looking people, and especial- 
ly among the producers and toilers, many of 
whom had passed through Ellis Island and 
knew from experience what was wrong with it 
and what should be made right with it, Mr. 
Howe's appointment gave the chicfest satisfac- 
tion. 

The finest and greatest proof that in his place 
of trust at Ellis Island Frederic C. Howe vin- 
dicated and upheld the national and international 
reputation he had earned as a writer of funda- 
mental democracy and as an official and un- 
official servant in action of the public has been 
given lately by a member of Congress, named 
W. S. Bennet, of New York. This Congress- 
man was irresponsible because he was privileged 
to make the most unfounded accusations against 
any public or private citizen without any re- 
sponsibility in a court of law or in any other 
tribunal for his statements. This Congressman 
exercised this privilege against a public official, 
who had not the privileges of the floor of 
Congress, as the result of the action of,. Com- 
missioner Howe in having advised that the 
Government should not continue a contract with 
a firm of former clients of the Congressman for 
feeding the immigrant men, women and children 
confided to the Government's care. .Mr. Howe's 
recommendations were that the contract, in- 
volving the expenditure of one-half million 
dollars a year, in time of normal immigration, 
and being very profitable, should not be re- 
newed, and that, instead the authorities at Ellis 
Island should purchase the food and prepare and 
supply it t<> the immigrants at cost. 

For this .Mr. Howe was assailed. 'For this 
unfounded rumors of "immorality" among the 
thousands of men and women of all nationalities 
who arc detained at the island were misstated 
as facts. That they were misstated was proved 
by an investigation begun at once by the Com- 
mittee on Immigration of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, co-operated with by Mr. Howe himself 
and the Department of Labor. The report of 
Secretary Wilson and Solicitor Densmore, 
adopted unanimously by the Committee of Con- 
gress, after inquiry, proved that a notable condi- 
tion of moral cleanliness prevailed, when it was 
considered that the exigencies of the European 
war and the impossibility of deporting many of 
the undesirables had crowded the island's 
grounds, hospitals and detention rooms far be- 
yond any provision that had been made for 
ordinary or foreseen occasions. The acts of 
kindness and humanity and necessary common 
sense in the emergency which Mr. Howe had 
done, and which had been approved by the 
Secretary of Labor, were misrepresented in 
themselves and distorted from the surrounding 
facts and conditions which inspired or com- 
pelled them. 

No public servant who "steps on the toes" 
of takers of profit where there should be no 
profit; no official who takes seriously the law's 
mandate to safeguard the weak and' oppressed 
wdio are in his care; no man in public or. private 
life who has stopped exploitation by greed of 
the poor and unsophisticated immigrants as 
Commissioner Howe has stoped it could escape 
such an attack. 

From this attack Commissioner Howe emerges 
not only completely vindicated, but with this 
statement of the Secrctray of Labor made to 
Congress concerning the things he had done: 

"The following substantial achievements in the 
efficient administration of the station have been 
effected by Commissioner Howe: 

"il) A thorough investigation with experts 
liade of the cost of hospitals which w ere 
alleged to be self-sustaining. The commissioner 
found that the hospitals were losing over $100,- 
000 a year, which loss was being paid by the 
nment for the benefit of the _ steamship 
companies. He secured an increase in hospital 
charges to steamship companies which has in- 
creased the earnings of the hospitals by ap 
proximately $100,000, 

"(2) lie reinvestigated requests for money 
i,, i permanent appropriations and after iuvestiga- 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 18, 1916. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping medium. A number of men 
around the hall during the week. Several fishing 
vessels arrived in port from Alaskan waters. 
JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 11, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

REGINALD TOWNSEND, Agent. 
Room 11, De Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 

St. 

Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 11, 1916. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 11, 1916. 
Xo meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 11, 1916. 
Shipping medium. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 11, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

E. J. D. LORENTZEN, Agent pro tern. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 11, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 11, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping dull. 

OTTO DITTMAR. Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 11, 1916. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128V5 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 5, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor; a number of 
members around the hall. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS* ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 14. 1916. 

No meeting. Shipping fair for waiters, medium 
for cooks. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 7, 1916. 
Xo meeting. Shipping medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 6, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping fair for waiters, slow 
for cooks. A few men ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box No. 54. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 11, 1916. 
Xo meeting. Shipping fair. No men ashore. 

THOMAS RAKER, Agent. 
98 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 



Fish packing and shipping firms operating in 
Prince Rupert have received notice that here 
after it will be necessary for them to take out 
licenses from the Province of British Columbia, 
to cost $100 a year, in order to carry on their 
business here. These companies already h 
municipal licenses from the city of Prince Ru- 
pert, for which they pay $50 a year, and il 
they wish to do any salting of salmon thev 
are further required to pay $50 a year for a 
license from the Province of British Columbia 
and $100 a year for a license from the Dominion 
<>f Canada. Thus a firm which packed and 
shipped halibut and also --.lb salmon would have 
tn pay $300 a year in license fees, lit- majority 
,,i il,, companii operating at Prince Rupert in 
the i>n kin" and shipping of fish are in reality 
branches of American companies, though most 
,,f them have obtianed separate incorporations 
as Canadian companies. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



POLITICIANS AND PREPAREDNESS. 



New York politicians have made a joke 
out of preparedness, not that they intended 
doing so, but simply because they were 
carried away in the panic for preparedness 
they adroitly instigated as a political sham, 
and which is fast engulfing them in the 
maelstrom of politics now surging. Un- 
fortunately, the people must pay for this 
unfortunate training of our New York poli- 
ticians. 

By dark room methods, and without ade- 
quate discussion, a number of bills were 
railroaded through the closing of the legis- 
lative session and immediately signed by 
Gov. Whitman. While the bills were in- 
tended to provide for compulsory military 
service and training, they simply demon- 
strate the futility of a State government, its 
lack of principle and its love of sham. 

One of these laws, the Slater Law, pro- 
vides for a commission of three men who 
are to recommend to the Board of Regents 
the establishment in schools "of habits, cus- 
toms and methods best adapted to develop 
correct physical posture and bearing, 
mental and physical alertness, self-control, 
disciplined initiative, sense of duty and a 
spirit of cooperation under leadership." 

In substance and effect the ideal set forth 
is purely educational. It is an ideal our 
schools have been striving for ever since 
they have been instituted. No objection 
can be raised against this ideal, but the 
idea of parading a separate board for inter- 
ference in the school management is a car- 
dinal sin against administrative efficiency. 

The worst way to improve our school 
svstem is to divide the management of 
schools between two conflicting authorities. 
The men who conceived this law showed 
a total lack of administrative wisdom and a 
complete ignorance of what education is 
supposed to accomplish. 

This commission is also to provide mili- 
tary training for boys between the ages of 
sixteen and nineteen. This training is not 
to aggregate more than three hours a week. 
Under conditions of this kind the military 
training these boys will secure will have 
about as much relation to modern warfare 
as teaching them how to play golf. Ap- 
parently Gov. Whitman and the legislators 
have overlooked the fact that modern war- 
fare is overwhelmingly a problem of en- 
gineering and mechanics and administra- 
tion. 

This law has not even the redeeming 
feature of being a health measure. Boys 
working for a living are exempted, and only 
those unemployed or going to high school 
are included. Large employers of labor, 
especially employers of youthful labor, were 
very careful that no interference was had 
with the employment of child labor. The 
law in question is a miserable piece of class 
legislation. It introduces into our public 
schools a most pernicious class division. It 
perpetuates the idea that military affairs 
are associated with leisure and wealth and 
destroys the ideal of democracy and of 
freedom so dear to the American people. 

It is ill-conceived legislation of this kind 
which discredits all rational policies of pre- 
paredness. When we find politicians re- 
viving methods abandoned by Germany 
and France and rushing through such 
shams and deceptions of preparedness, men 
have good reason and justifiable cause to 
seriously question the proposals of estab- 



lishing compulsory military training and 
service, even in the form provided in the 
new Stivers Law. It is actions of this kind 
which cause men to halt with awe and 
horror, to resist to the utmost placing into 
the hands of such irresponsible officials the 
enormous power of conscription. The blood 
tax of conscription is the most serious in- 
strument of government ever invented. Our 
democracy and the liberties of our people 
are today seriously menaced. If men like 
these New York politicians can take away 
from the people rights and privileges, their 
liberties and freedom, and force them to do 
their bidding under pretense of prepared- 
ness, then God help us when the time 
comes for them to exercise the power of 
conscription! — The American Photo-En- 
graver. 



LABOR AND THE EIGHT-HOUR DAY. 



It has long been apparent to the ob- 
serving that the struggle between the rail- 
way managers and the trainmen represents 
but a phase of the eight-hour question. 
It is, indeed, because it is only one phase 
of a vast question that it is so hard to 
settle. The indiscretion of the manager 
who predicted that the President would 
"hear from organized business of the coun- 
trv" merely confirmed the well grounded 
suspicion that the business interests whom 
the managers pretended to represent ob- 
jected to any yielding to the trainmen, not 
because of any added expense in railroad 
operation, but because the granting of an 
eight-hour day to 400,000 rail operatives 
would mean the early extension of the 
eight-hour day to all other labor. 

The struggle of organized labor for an 
eight-hour day has become world wide. But 
the organization is not sufficiently strong 
to carry it in all trades at once. For this 
reason each advance is made through the 
organization having the power to win its 
point. Numerous trades and occupations 
are now on an eight-hour basis, and the 
popular sentiment in favor of the move is 
so strong that should 400,000 trainmen 
succeed in placing their service on an eight- 
hour basis its influence throughout the 
labor w-orld would be overwhelming. This 
is why the managers have exhausted every 
recourse rather than grant the men's de- 
mand. They know, and the vast commer- 
cial interests back of them know, that such 
a breach in the wall will lead inevitably to 
the capture of the citadel. — The Public. 



RAILROAD EIGHT-HOUR LAW. 



The essential parts of the Adamson law 
are as follows : 

"Section 1 — That beginning December 1, 
1916, eight hours shall, in contracts for 
labor and service, be deemed a day's work 
and the measure or standard of a day's 
work for the purpose of reckoning the com- 
pensation for services of all employes who 
are now or may hereafter be employes of 
any common carrier by railroad. . . . 
and who are now or may hereafter be 
actually engaged in anv capacity in the op- 
eration of trains used for the transporta- 
tion of persons or property on railroads 
from any State or territory of the United 
States or the District of Columbia to anv 
other State or territory of the United States 
or the District of Columbia. . . . 

"Section 2— That the President shall ap- 



point a commission of three which shall 
observe the operation and effects of the 
institution of the eight-hour standard work- 
day, as above defined, and the facts and 
conditions affecting the relations between 
such common carriers and employes during 
a period of not less than six months nor 
more than nine months, in the discretion of 
the commission, and within thirty days 
thereafter such commission shall report its 
findings to the President and Congress ; 
that each member of the commission 
created under the provisions of this act 
shall receive such compensation as may be 
fixed by the President. . . . 

"Section 3 — That pending the report of 
the commission herein provided for and for 
a period of thirty days thereafter the com- 
pensation of railway employes subject to 
this act for a standard eight-hour workday 
shall not be reduced below the present 
standard day's wage, and for all necessary 
time in excess of eight hours such employes 
shall be paid at a rate not less than the pro 
rata rate for such standard eight-hour 
workday. 

"Section A — That any person violating 
any provision of this act shall be guilty of 
a misdemeanor and upon conviction shall 
be fined not less than $100 and not more 
than $1,000, or imprisoned not to exceed 
one year, or both. 



MASONS FOR EIGHT-HOUR DAY. 



Thanks to the labor organization, the 
hours of labor have been reduced. Not 
very long ago they were from fourteen to 
sixteen hours a day. It was no boy's play 
to bring them down to twelve, and then to 
ten. The struggle to bring them down to 
eight is now on. It is the same hard strug- 
gle as all the earlier struggles were. There 
are those who sneer at the thought of an 
eight-hour day, as if it were something 
new, something unheard of, something 
absurd. Yet, we have indications in the 
ritual of the Masonic order that an eight- 
hour day was regarded as a fair work day 
as long ago at least as before our Civil 
War, probably as long ago as two hundred 
years, possibly as far back as the Middle 
Ages, or to the construction of Solomon's 
temple. When free Masons repeat the 
formula, "Eight hours for the service of 
God and a distressed brother, eight for our 
usual vocations, and eight for refreshment 
and sleep," do they realize that they are 
advocating an eight-hour day? And in the 
very language of generations of Masons 
who have gone before them? Think of it, 
at this stage of industrial progress, that 
wage workers must struggle for the same 
eight-hour day that was considered a full 
day long before marvelous inventions had 
enormously increased the productive power 
of labor! — Excerpts from Labor Day Ad- 
dress of Louis F. Post, Assistant Secretary 
of Labor, at Topeka, Kansas, Sept. 4, 1916. 



WEALTH DEMANDS SECURITY. 



What is the reason that we are building 
ships of war and increasing the size of our 
navy? It is because the millionaire monop- 
olists are becoming afraid of a poverty- 
stricken people which their oppressive 
trusts and combinations are creating. It 
is because great wealth, unjustly acquired, 
always wants the security of standing ar- 
mies and navies. — Henry George. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ERZERUM. 



Erzerum, the great Turkish fortress in 
Armenia, which has fallen to the Russians 
under the Grand Duke Nicholas, has 
figured prominently in Russo-Turkish his- 
tory during the past hundred years. In 
the war of 1829, that reflex of the Greek 
war of independence, it was captured by 
the Russian general Paskievich, whose vic- 
torious advance was only arrested by the 
conclusion of peace at Adrianople. It was, 
however, in the war of 1877-78 that Er- 
zerum came most into prominence, in that 
strangely separate campaign in which 
Mukhtar Pasha and Loris Meliov strove for 
the mastery of the Caucasus and Armenia. 
After the Turkish defeat at the great battle 
of Aladja dagh, on October 15, 1878, the 
remnants of Mukhtar's army retreated on 
Erzerum. Part of the Russian army stayed 
to besiege Kars, and part pressed on in pur- 
suit. Erzerum fell on November 9, and 
two days later came the fall of Kars. By 
the treaty of Berlin, however, Erzerum 
was restored to Turkey, as it had been 
previously, by the treaty of Adrianople, 
after the Russian occupation in 1829. 

The strategic importance of Erzerum has 
always been recognized. It closes the roads 
from Kars, Olti and other parts of the 
frontier, and, lying as it does athwart the 
great caravan route from Trebizond, on 
the Black Sea, to Teheran and various 
parts of Anatolia, it holds a commanding 
position as regards trade. Again, situated 
at the eastern end of an open, bare plain 
some thirty miles long and twelve miles 
wide, and peculiarly well supplied with 
water from the many streams, little and 
big, which flow into the valley from the 
Palanduken range, Erzerum makes an ideal 
base for an advancing army, and has al- 
ways been so regarded. It is a town of 
great antiquity, and has been identified with 
the Armenian Garin Kalakh and the Byzan- 
tine Theodosiopolis of the fifth century, at 
which time it was one of the frontier for- 
tresses of the empire. 

Captured by the Seljuks in 1201, when it 
was a city of considerable importance, Er- 
zerum finally came into the possession of 
Turkey in 1517, and has remained a Turk- 
ish possession ever since. To-day it is a 
town of about 43,000 people, mostly Arme- 
nians and Persians, cramped behind its 
ramparts and built, for the most part, of 
gray volcanic stone. The streets are nar- 
row and crooked, and the general aspect 
is cheerless enough, largely owing to the 
absence of trees ; but the scenery in the 
neighborhood is striking after a fashion all 
its own. Lofty, bare mountains are to be 
seen all around, interspersed by wide ex- 
panses of open plain dotted here and there 
with villages. 

Armenia, of course, is but a continuation 
westward of the great Iranian plateau. 
From a general level of about 6000 feet, 
the plateau descends abruptly in the north 
to the shores of \he Black Sea, and, in the 
south, breaks down in rugged terraces to 
the lowlands of Mesopotamia. It is in it- 
self a land of broad elevated valleys, 
through which the rivers of the plateau 
flow on their way to the great gorges 
which give access to the lower levels. 
Everything is on a large scale, great rivers 
such as Tigris and Euphrates; mountains 
such as Ararat, which lifts its historic peak 
to a height of 17,000 feet, and lakes such 



as Lake Van, twice the size of Lake 
Geneva, and lying about 5000 feet above 
the sea. Everything too is high up in the 
world. Most of the towns lie high, from 
4000 to 6000 feet. The valleys are wide 
expanses of arable land, whilst the hills are 
generally covered with grass and are tree- 
less. The situation of Erzerum is thus 
typically Armenian, to the western eye 
often monotonous and even dreary ; but 
always showing that rugged grandeur so 
characteristic of the country as a whole. 



CITIZENSHIP OF LICENSED MEN. 



The President of the United States, in 
pursuance of the authority conferred upon 
him by Section 2 of the act approved Aug- 
ust 18, 1914, entitled "An Act to provide 
for the admission of foreign-built ships to 
American registry for the foreign trade, 
and for other purposes," and in order to 
extend the privileges of said act with re- 
spect to the licensing of officers and non- 
inspection of such vessels admitted to 
American registry, under date of September 
1, 1916, ordered as follows: 

"1. That the provisions of the law pre- 
scribing that the watch officers of vessels 
of the United States registered for foreign 
trade shall be citizens of the United States, 
are hereby suspended so far and for such 
length of time as is herein provided, 
namely : All watch officers now employed 
on foreign-built ships which have been 
admitted to United States registry under 
said act who, heretofore, have declared 
their intention to become citizens of the 
United States and watch officers on such 
ships who, within six months from this 
date, shall declare their intention to become 
such citizens, shall be entitled to serve on 
foreign-built ships so registered until the 
time shall have expired within which they 
may become such citizens under their dec- 
larations, and shall be eligible for promo- 
tion upon any foreign-built ship so regis- 
tered. 

"2. That the provisions of law requiring 
survey, inspection and measurement, by 
officers of the United States, of foreign- 
built ships admitted to United States regis- 
try under said act are hereby suspended so 
far and for such length of time as is herein 
provided, namely: The said provisions 
shall not apply to any such foreign-built 
ship during the period of one year from 
this date, provided the Secretary of Com- 
merce is satisfied in the case of any such 
ship that the ship is safe and seaworthy 
and that proper effort is being made to 
comply with the said provisions." 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



SUNSHINE, AIR AND WATER. 



One of those who have fenced the shore 
of Lake Michigan off from the people, 
writing in defense of the course, says : "We 
do not object to bathers using our private 
beaches," but, and so on. The full signi- 
cance of this is not discernible unless we 
imagine some other person writing, "We 
do not object to people breathing our 
private air," or, "We have no objection to 
people enjoying our private sunshine," but, 
and so on. It has taken centuries of wrong 
thinking to lead people into the notion that 
there can be private ownership in the 
beaches of the Great Lakes, or of the 
oceans. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 652. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 406 N. Clark Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y TO Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 365. 

BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, WI». Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELEF STATIONS: 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Wis. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Ludington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. u 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



has been released on bail pending a new- 
trial. When asked if he had anything to 
say why sentence should not be pro- 
nounced, Lawson denounced Judge Hillyer 
and his hand picked jury, composed of coal 
company partisans. 



Why Employers Favor Service Pension. 

The Southern Pacific railroad warned 
employes thai if they joined the threatened 
strike for an eight-hour day they will for- 
feit their pension rights and Editor Barry 
of The Star says : 

"That was to have been expected. Every 
corporation that introduces an 'old age pen- 
sion' scheme do^s so with the reservation, 
clearly expressed, that it may withdraw its 
provisions whenever it sees fit to d 
In other words, the employe never acquires 
a 'vested right' to he cared for in his old 
it all depends upon his subservience 
and willingness to submit to the rules laid 
down by his superiors for his guidance. 

"That is the difference between a real 
pension, such as the Typographical Union, 
for instance, provides for its aged members, 
and the "tin-can' kind which has a nice 
strong string tied to it and can be dis- 
connected without consulting the wishes of 
the supposed beneficiary. One may work 
lor 20 or 25 years with the tempting bait 
of provision for his declining years dangling 
before his eyes, only to discover that on 
accounl of some infraction of rules or a 
desire to improve his condition by acting 
with his fellow employes, he is cut off from 
the promised benefits of long and faithful 
service. 

"No doubt the service pension is a 
thing in its way; but its real object is to 
enforce obedience and subservience by 
threat of its withdrawal. Tt is not a safe 
dependence for red-blooded Americans." 



Strikebreakers Riot. 
About 400 strikebreakers, returning west 

from New York, where they had been 
herded in the event of a railroad strike. 
broke loose in a free for-all fight when their 
train reached Cleveland. Tt is said the 
riot started, because of a feud between St. 
T.ouis and Chicago "free and independents." 
Every window in two coaches was shat- 
tered by bullets and the tracks were strewn 
with revolvers, knives and blackjacks, dis- 
carded by the thugs when the train stopped 
and it was charged by police reserves. 

( )ne man was shot and killed and his 
body thrown from the moving train to the 
tracks, where the wheels dismembered him ; 
a second, shol in the side, was carried from 
the train dying; two men. one of them 
usly hurt, were captured and charged 
with murder; another, so badly injured that 
he had to be placed under guard in a hos- 
pital, was charged with shooting to kill: a 
sixth was stabbed so he is in a serious con- 
dition, and ten others were thrown into 
cells at police headquarters. 



Gains in Colorado. 

Writing in the American Federationist, 
current issue Secretary-Treasurer Ander- 
son, of the Colorado State Federation of 
Labor, says ; 

"Colorado, the home of Rockefeller's be- 
nevolent paternalism and trying-out place 
of other fads and experiments that affect 
the welfare of the working people (among 



which might be mentioned the industrial 
commission law. inflicted on us by the last 
legislature), can. in spite of all these afrlic- 
i ions, report a year of industrial activity 
and growth for the family of labor organ- 
izations, not dreamed of by the most op- 
timistic of our membership." 

Secretar) Treasurer Anderson says sev- 
eral large anti-union corporations have in- 
creased wages of employes, "not out of 
their love for them, but because of ex- 
it cy. 

"In connection with this voluntary in- 
crease," continues the unionist, "it might 
be well to mention that it is easy to give, 
and just as easy to take away, and without 
an organization to protect their rights they 
have no assurance how long they will be 
the recipients of their masters' generosity. 
In the plan of the Rockefeller 'union' any 
method to make or enforce a demand for 
an increase of wages, or better working 
conditions, is very conspicuous by its ab- 
sence." 



QUALITIES OF THE WRITER. 



art of writing is one desired by 
main-. The ambition is a noble one if the 
incentive is the wish to express pure and 
helpful thoughts or inscribe words of con- 
solation. 

The ability to think along uplifting lines 
docs not necessarily imply the possession 
of a literary gift. A skill is necessary in 
imparting the truths to others. And despite 
the general advice to write naturally what 
comes to mind, certain rules of expression 
apply. Well chosen words are abridged 
sentences, one should remember, and make 
for brevity. 

Literary style consist-, in giving a body 
and a shape to the thought by the phrase. 
The construction should he with words ap- 
propriate. 

Pertinent advice is given writers by 
Joseph Joubert, famous French author of 
aphorisms, in the early nineteenth century: 

"Never write anything that does not give 
you enjoyment: emotion passes easily from 
tlie writer to the reader. 

"The fine feelings and ideas that we 
wish to set forth in our writings should 
become familiar to us. in order that the 
case and charm of intimacy he felt in their 
expression. 

"All that we say should be suffused with 
ourselves, with our soul. This operation 
is long, hut it immortalizes everything. 

"The mind conceives with pain, but 
brings forth with delight. 

"When writing we should recollect that 
scholars are present : but it is not to them 
we should speak. 

"An ordinary book needs only a subject: 
but for a fine work there is a germ which 
develops itself in the mind like a plant. 
The sole beautiful works are those that 
have been for a long while, if not worked 
over, at least meditated upon. 

"Many useless phrases come into the 
head, hut the mind grinds its colors out of 
them, 

"In the minds of certain writers nothing 
i< grouped or draped or modeled : their 
pages only offer a fiat surface on which 
words roll. 

"The end of a work should always sug- 
gest the beginning. 

"There never was a literary age whose 



dominant taste was not unhealthy. The 
success of excellent authors consists in 
making wholesome works agreeable to 
morbid tastes. 

"Taste is the literal} conscience of the 
soul. 

"When in any nation an individual is 
born who is capable of producing a great 
thought, another is born capable of com- 
prehending it ami admiring it. 

"It is worth a hundred times more to 
adapt a work to the nature of the human 
mind than to what is called the state of 
society. In man there is something immu- 
table: thence it is, that in the arts and 
works of art there are fixed rules — beauties 
that will always please, or else contrivances 
that will please hut for a short time." 

It needs clearness of intellect and delicate 
tact to he a great writer. Force in writing 
is not always energy; nothing is literature 
that has not delicacy of touch. 



A NOTABLE VINDICATION. 
(Continued from Page 7.) 



tion reduced such requests, in 1915, by $300,000. 

"(3) He reduced, in response to war condi- 
tions, the operating salary costs of ttie Ellis 
Island station by approximately $100,000 a 
year. 

"(4) He investigated the many immigration 
lodging houses and homes in New York and 
brought ahout a clean-up in a number of them. 

"(5)_ He secured the co-operation of the 
commissioner of police to clean up the con- 
ditions which surround the barge office, and 
by SO doing protected the incoming immigrants 
at New York from the individuals who had 
previously preyed upon them. 

"(6) He investigated and brought ahout many 
us in the protection of the alien 
route from Ellis Island, both at Jersey City 
and along the route. 

"(7) He organized all of the employes at the 

station into an association for making the wants 

of the employes known and for securing the 

co-operation of all the employes in the adminis- 

>n of the station. 

"(8) He brought about a reorganization of 
irehasing of supplies for the hospitals at a 
I saving and improvement in the service. 

"(9) He made an investigation of the condi- 
tions under which landing of first and second 
cabin aliens were made at the various piers 
around New York, and ended many abuses ami 
los-es to which the aliens were exposed. 

"I 10) He brought about a change in the in- 
spection of first- and second-cabin aliens on 
shipboard which greatly improved the service. 

"ill) He made a number of studies at the 
-t of the department as to means for in- 
creasing the efficiency and the rating of the 
employes. 

"(\2) He greatly increased the output of the 
Division of Statistics and brought about a com- 
plete change in the filing system. 

"(13) He worked in co-operation with the 
Board of Education of New York for the open- 
ing of the night schools for the education of 
adult aliens. 

"(14) He organized a number of agencies 
looking to the protection of aliens in New 
York. 

"(IS) He organized a movement in 1916 for 
Americanization day celebrations throughout tin- 
count ry. and over one hundred cities held 
citizenship celebrations as a result of the com- 
missioner's efforts. 

"(16) During the past two years Ellis Island 
has been almost free from the constant criticism 
on the part of foreign organizations and of the 
foreign press, which prior to his administration 
continuous. It was directed at the alleged 
lack of kindness and consideration to incoming 
aliens. The nonforeign press of New York has 
been almost continuous in its approval of his 
administration and the many changes and im- 
provements which he has brought about. 

"I remain verv respectfully, yours, 

"W. B. .WILSON, 

"Secretary or Labor." 

When one considers that the very first "in- 
dustrial relations" with which the immigrants 
come in contact are the industrious activities of 
big and little interests to take their money away 
from them, it is easier to estimate the fine 
quality of public service that Frederic C. Howe 
lias given. He has served the immigrants. He 
added to the distinction of the present 
administration of the Government. He has 
made the property rights within his jurisdiction 
get in line with human rights. He has served 
constructive democracy. He has advanced the 
'deal of a public service that holds an even 
hand for fair play ami honesty. — Dante Barton, 
for the Committee on Industrial Relations. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



THE LION AND THE MOUSE. 



"Mr. Hogg, I am here as a represent- 
ative of your employes. I am an organizer 
of labor. Now, sir, will you tell me why 
you refuse the small increase in pay which 
they are asking?" 

"Because, my dear young lady, they have 
threatened to organize and force me to 
pay it; and I will not be dictated to by 
my employes ; and because they are now 
getting all that I can or will afford to 
pay them. Competition is sharp and I will 
not allow them to loot my profits — not for 
another cent. No; not if I have to starve 
them into submission and crush these 
damnable union ideas of theirs." 

"You say competition is sharp. Then, 
sir, why don't you big mill men get 
together, as you do anyway, and raise the 
price of your cotton goods a fraction of a 
cent per yard and give that to your em- 
ployes? No one in this great country, no 
true American, would grumble at paying 
such a little bit more for goods which are 
already so very, very cheap. The American 
people would gladly welcome that oppor- 
tunity to give their mite to such a worthy 
cause." 

"My interfering young friend, I do not 
need any instructions or advice from you 
about the running of my business. So run 
along, now, and don't bother me any more 
about things you do not understand." 

"But, my dear sir, T do understand, ll 
is you who do not understand the wretch- 
edness and misery of their surroundings. 
I have visited these people, hundreds and 
thousands of them. I have been one of 
them, at different times, for reasons of my 
own, and I will say to you that the deso- 
late hovels that most of them are forced 
by poverty to live in, are not fit for the 
abode of animals. You say you will starve 
them into submission. God knows they are 
already starving. Starving, and not alone 
for proper and wholesome food, but for 
clothing and fuel to keep them and their 
miserable families from suffering and freez- 
ing in the winter. They are starving for 
education which they cannot get. They 
are starving for sunshine and recreation 
necessary to make the American boy an 
American man, and an American soldier, 
if you please. They are starving for the 
rest they need and crave and cannot afford 
to take. Starving for the care that all the 
laws of God and nature demand to mature 
girlhood and womanhood. Starving for 
the vitality necessary to bring children into 
the world, and to be the mothers of this 
great nation. They are robbed of the 
chance to produce the greatest of all great 
human beings on earth : the strong, healthy, 
free born American citizen. And they are 
fighting : fighting, Oh ! so b r a a- e 1 v ! 
Wounded, bleeding, starving and freezing, 
but fighting on and on and on. And 
against such fearful odds! And you, you 
whose duty it should be, and is, to brighten 
their paths and lighten their loads, are 
going out of your way to make their 
burdens tenfold harder to bear. You gave 
them nothing unorganized, and now you 
want to starve them and crush them be- 
cause they have threatened to organize. 
You would take away their only weapon 
cf self-defense — organization — leaving them 
righting your great organization single- 
handed. Fighting a pitiable, uphill fighl 
against degradation, humiliation and starva- 



tion. Yes, you give to charity, more's the 
pity. And whose pockets do you take it 
from? Whose backs and stomachs and 
minds and constitutions do you rob in 
order to give liberally to charity? It is not 
you who are building these great charitable 
institutions, these grand hospitals, libraries, 
etc. It is the miserable underpaid working- 
man, and working woman, and working 
children groveling in the dust at your feet, 
who are doing all these things. They are 
the people who are giving to charity and 
paying the bills in full : with money and 
with tears and with blood and with their 
very lives. We do not want your damnable 
charity. Charity is an insult, a blow on 
the check of American dignity, honor and 
independence. Give to your employes what 
you are wasting on your beautiful charity, 
and they will buy their own books, pay 
their own doctors, educate their own chil- 
dren, buy their own Christmas dinners and 
Christmas toys, and care for their own 
sick and wounded. They do not want 
"charity" like the dog collar around their 
necks; they want the right to live; they 
want the opportunity to rise above the level 
of the swine. They know, and God knows, 
that every time you people give a million 
for charity you are forcing the State and 
the nation to spend millions more for alms- 
houses, penitentiaries and insane asylums. 
You call me a rebel. Well, John Hancock 
and Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson, 
and George Washington were rebels, and 
their records and their statues are in the 
halls of fame. They rebelled against the 
tyranny of their fatherland and they built 
the foundation and laid the cornerstone of 
a nation which should be now the greatest, 
and richest, and freest on earth. A na- 
tion where all men were intended to be 
equal, regardless of wealth, power or posi- 
tion. A nation where capital and labor 
were intended to stand hand in hand and 
shoulder to shoulder. But you and your 
colleagues care nothing for the liberty and 
freedom of American citizens. Freedom 
and liberty appeal not to you unless it is 
for you and yours alone. I wish to God 
there were fifty million more rebels like 
myself in this great broad land — not to 
rebel against this big-hearted and good- 
natured country ; but to rebel against the 
vampires who are sucking the warm life- 
blood from her veins ; against the human 
millstones hung around her neck, and 
against the highwaymen and pickpockets 
who are swiftly and surely robbing her of 
everything of value she possesses; every- 
thing she needs so badly for herself and for 
her children. Shame! Shame on you! You 
and your associates in crime ; the steel 
barons, the coal barons, and the rest. 
You, whose sayings and grand opinions are 
so eagerly sought by the press and gullible 
public, you are the men who are crying 
out for preparedness — preparedness, by a 
great, heroic and patriotic army and navy — 
you, who are proudly pointed out and 
honored as America's greatest men and 
noblest citizens! Shame on you, and shame 
on the lawyers who do your bidding, and 
shame on the politicians, and judges, and 
clergymen who accept your dirty dollars! 
You ought to be ashamed to look a decent, 
honest American in the face, you coward!" 
— James Gorman, in "The Shoeworker's 
[ournal." 



Labor's Economic Platform 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where thy have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C, 1424 Government St. 

VANCOUVER. B. C, 213 Hastings St., E. coiner of 
Hastings and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2216 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts„ 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
, SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 
Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 
PORTLAND, Ore., 242 Flanders St. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Room No. 203, Grand Trunk 
Dock. P. O. Box 214. 
PORTLAND, Ore., 98 Second St. N. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 
PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca SI. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada, 437 Gore A 
PRINCE RUPERT < B. C). Canada, P. O. Box 988. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O, Box 188. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN 'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
SAN KKANC1SCO. Cal.. 10 Bast St. 
SACR VMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



The American Federation of Labor 
lias moved its offices to the new 
seven-story A. F. of L. building, at 
the corner of Massachusetts a\ 
and Ninth street, northwest, Wash- 
ington. The building was dedicated 
July 4 last. 

Compensation insurance, controlled 
entirely by the State, was favored by 
President Fenton in his annual re- 
port to the Oklahoma State Federa- 
tion of Labor convention. Oklahoma 
unionists urged State insurance at 
the last Legislature and presented a 
bill along these lines, but the Senate 
rejected the section. "And during 
the past year," said President Fenton, 
"the insurance companies have reaped 
a golden harvest as a result of their 
work at the regular session, and 
employers are paying higher premi- 
ums than would have been necessary 
under an insurance law." The union- 
ist recommended that convicts be 
used on State roads instead of allow- 
ing them to come in competition 
with free labor. 

The executive board of the Illinois 
division of the Farmers' Educational 
and Co-operative Union of America, 
in session at Grayville, has passed 
the following resolution: "Whereas, 
the miners of Rosiclare, Hardin 
county, Illinois, unable to live under 
the present wage scale and labor 
conditions pertaining there, at- 
tempted to organize and were ob- 
structed and blacklisted by the oper- 
ators, and even terribly oppressed 
by the civil authorities of the town 
and county; therefore, be it resolved, 
that we extend the sympathy of our 
organization to these brothers in toil, 
and urge all our members to do 
everything in their power to assist 
them in obtaining better conditions 
of life and labor." 

When the Cigarmakers' Union of 
Lima, Ohio, began an organizing 
campaign at the factories of the 
Deisel-Wemmer Company, the super- 
intendent began to make speeches to 
the 1600 employes. At his first effort 
he sternly declared: "We know that 
a lot of you people are joining the 
union, and I want to tell you that 
we will let our tobacco rot in the 
warehouse before we raise the wages 
of a single employe one penny and 
we will close these shops down for- 
ever rather than be dictated to by 
the union." Then the meeting ad- 
journed and about 700 of the $4 a 
k pirls and low wage men joined 
the union. At the next meeting the 
superintendent gave forth the glad 
tidings that the company had con- 
cluded to raise wages. 

Because official acts and judicial 
decisions have undermined the pur- 
pose of the Ohio Workmen's Com- 
pensation law, Secretary-Treasurer 
Donnelly of the State Federation of 
Labor urges Ohio trade unionists to 
circulate petitions for a referendum 
law that will prohibit private com- 
panies from writing liability insur- 
ance. The executive board of the 
State Federation of Labor inaugu- 
rated this referendum because of a 
recent decision by the State Supreme 
Court and the licensing of private 
companies by the State Insurance 
Commissioner. The workers insist 
that these rulings have violated the 
spirit of compensation legislation and 
they are demanding that private com- 
panies be eliminated and that em- 
ployers contribute to the State fund 
or pay compensation direct to injured 
workmen or the dependents of those 
killed in industry. 



Office Phone 
Elliott 1196 



MARSHALL'S 



Residence 
North 3445 



NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

Compasses Adjusted 

301-2 P I. BUILDING, Next to Post Office 

Established 1890 SEATTLE, WASH. 



Eureka, Cal. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 
1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St 
Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter Li$t. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 

Ackerson, A. R. Laamanen, J. 

rsen, A. -1821 Laine, A. V. 

Andersen, P. T. Larsen, Nels 

Andersen, Oscar • Larsen, C. A. 

Andersen -918 T.arsen, Ed 

Alfredsen, Adolf Larsen, Axel 

Anderson, Ole A. Livingstone. E. 

Andersen, A. C. Mathisen, Sigurd 

.1108 Magnusen, Lars 
Anderson, G. (Cas- Marfarlane. .las. 

S l e ) Maenads, Henry 

Anderson, John Melntosh, James 
Anderson, Alf. -1638 Mictenen, John 

Anderson. Albert Morrisay. James 

\ st id Ole Mvnkmeyer. H. 

Bekker, Geo. K. Mikkelsen. K. -ir,?n 

Rranz. J. A. Miller. James 

Behm F. Mortensen. J. R. 

Benson, b. Moore. Albert 
Benson. C. A. -1894 Newland. Ernst 

Rergstrom, A. Nygren, GuS 

Bnoh M Nielsen. Estwan 

Billsteln, K. Nllsen, Feder 

Brennan. P. Nitske. C. 

Bessen. George Nygard. Oluf 

Berg. Johannes Ness. J. 

Oarlson, John Nelsen. Adolf 

Connor. W. F. Nelsen, A..W. 

Carruthers. M. Olsen. A. M. -911 

Phristensen, -13G6 Olsen, James 

Carlson. Gust Olsen. Tellef 

r.ittingham. F. Olsen. Harald 

Davidsen, John Olsen, Ole 

Pnncan, Geo. Olsen, O. A. -1303 

Besrers. J. O. W. Olsson. T. H. 

F.riksen, Otto Olsen, B. -T. r i7 

Krdman. Paul Olsen. Chr. M. 

30n. J. R. Olsen. Oswald 

Krhe L J. Ozerhowskl. Ten 

Bspedal. J. Pictzman. L. T>. 

Evans J Pnhlirates. Aug. 

Ferney, S. Peterson, W. 

Fernqulst. C. W. Peterson. Palle 

Ford L Powers, James A. 

Fran'zell. A. Pabst. Max 
Frederlcksen B. J. Petersen. Lawrence 

Gardner. James Permin. J. 

Onbrielsen. P. Poohus. S. 

Oerber, Fritz Rostoln. A. M. 

Oilroy \Vm. Rasmnssen, John 

Hansen. Ole Reaues. N. R. 

HaavoldL P. Weinink. H. 

Tlaugrud H O. Rohherstad. Nils 

TTnlmstrom. Harry Rnndstronv A 

TIalln J Salvesen. Soerdrup 

Hemes K. Sehmidt E. H. 

Hendersen. Rob. Seeley. T. 

TTnhn. H. P. -2081 Stein, Herman 

TTnhne A Stammerjohan. C. 

TTetten C. Strasrlin. A. W. 

r, Ernest "nmslne. C. X. 
Walvnrsen. John L. R«muelsen. W. B. 

Haug. G. tt. Sehaurman W. 

Tversen. Ole <=nmr.son O. 

Jaeobsnn. J. PofMn. E. 

Tarobson. O. <=k^lsnr>oe. \. 

Jensen. Hans a tohr F C. 

Johansen Ocnr Sorter. T 

Jnrsrensen. Olaf «trand. Ob. 

Jnnee. TT. Stewart. \. 

Jobansnn. Aug. Strand. Al 

.Tonssnn Farl Tiormen. K. M 

Johnsen Peder T,iUerm>-skl. Pari 
Johnson. A. W. -°186 T aft. Hani 

Jansson B. F. IT. Thorsen. Andrew 

•--en. Oluf ■""nlAntlnsen. G. 

WrmtRen Pete Walters An- 

Work! T Wornersen. L. 

Voeh W. wtnlrsten. \ 

T.-i..rsvik. Johan ^etlnnd J, ,1m 

Kristlansen, Nils w P «terli>".i. \ 

T.-alberg. Arvld w n l=h Fd. 

T^olodzu, G. -"-.blstrom F 

Kviif-er. Johan wuUims. T. C. 

Lewis. James ^Irkstrom. Anton 

T.nndprsen. Pari Young. A. 



Phone Main 1202 

L. V. WESTERMAN 

CLOTHIER 

FURNISHER and HATTER 
ALASKA OUTFITTER 

220-222 First Avenue South, at Main 
SEATTLE 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 

Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 

Puget Sound District. Formerly 

Instructor In New York Nautical College. 

Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 

Third Floor, First Avenue Side 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy ® Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 



C. O'CONNOR 



612 Fourth St. 



Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUp'oF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Adolfsson, Gottfrid Melngall, M. 

Bratt, F. H. Nielsen, Niels -751 

Carlson, Gustaf Olsson, Per 

Hodson, H. I. Peel, Peter 

Jacobson. Gustaf Slmonson. Sigvard 

Jensen, Hans -1555 Soter. Erik 

Lundgren, Carl Suomlnen, Oskar 

Magnusson, Ernest Svensen, John 

W. T'llman, Emll 

Marks, Thorwald Vigen, Ellas 
Martinsson, E. 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 
■ Trunks and Suitcases ■ 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 

Contreras. Julio Kustel. Victor J. 

Kyrkslatt. Lars Klnowsky, A. 

Lawrence. Harry Ingebrethsen, Alf. 
Melander, G. L. 



Alaska Fishermen 



Arentse, John 
Ast, P. 

Brormare. Adolf 
Carey, Arthur L. 
Frost. H. C. 
Hakanson, John 
Jansen, Jacob 
Jansson, Axel. J. 
Johnsen. Harry 
Johnsen, August 



Koester, Ernst 
Kester, Erich 
Knudsen, O. 
Larsen, Martin 
Nelson, Chas. R. 
Noland, Edvard 
Odland. Sven 
Petersen, Andrew 
Werner, Chas. J. 
Wilhelmson, Seth 



Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 8393 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Alfred Pettersen Hilland, a native 
of Bergen, Norway, age 44, is in- 
quired for by his brother, Randolph 
Pettersen. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, 100 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 7-26-16 

Gumersindo Fernandez, formerly 
messboy on steamer "Watson," 
should call at the offices of Nathan 
H. Frank, 1215 Merchants Exchange 
Bldg., San Francisco, and receive 
salvage money due him from S. S. 
"Camino." 8-30-16 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Ingvald Andreas Hansen, alias 
Andrew Hansen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 36; tall, dark; last 
heard of July, 1905. His address 
then was, Andrew Hansen, Karluk, 
Kodiak Island, Alaska. He is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Staff Captain Robert Smith, 
district officer, native work, Alaska, 
Box 925, Wrangell. 4-13-15 

Olof Pedersen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 60, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify J. T. 
Miles. 761 Greenwich St., New York, 
N. Y. 2-16-16 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Thomas Rowe (now aged about 
74), who was at one time a seaman 
and longshoreman on the Pacific 
Coast and also served in the Pacific 
Coast Navy Yards, will greatly oblige 
inquiring relatives by supplying such 
information. Address, Editor, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 1-5-6 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET AT THIRD AND KEARNY 

FALL STYLES NOW READY 
FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

Prices $30 to $50 

Unl ° n Own ad Sho'p ° Ur OPEN SATURDAY EVENINGS UNTIL 10 O'CLOCK 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 



Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 



P. ROSBNSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Andreasen, N. S. 
Anderson, N. P. 
Anderson, Nil* 
Anderson, Rasmus 
Adolfsen, John 
Andreson, Hans 
Anderson, Gotfrid 
Benson, S. 
Bernhardsen, Chas. 
Bernadt, H. W. 
Brien, Hans 
Bosse, Geo. 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Dybdal, Olaf 
Edstrom, John 
Erickson, Eric 
Fisher, Fritz 
Hoten, J. 

Henriks, Waldemar 
Hagen, Arthur 
Hein, M. 
Hylander, Gust 
Jespersen, Martin 
Jonsson, Karl 
Jensen, Henry 
Johansen, Nikolai 
Jarwinen, John 



Johansson, Chas. 

-2407 
Karlsen, Ingvald 
Kjer, Magnus 
Kristensen, Wm. 
Lindberg, A. C. 
Lange, Peter H. 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Ljungstrom, John 
Larsson, C. -1632 
Molen, Derk von 
Nygren, Gust 
Ohlsson, J. W. 
Oglive, Wm. A. 
Paulson, Herman 
Palm, P. A. 
Roos, Oscar 
Rensmand, Robert 
Rosenberg, Adolf 
Ryberg, S. 
Smith, John 
Swanson, John L. V. 
Schroder, Paul 
Sward, A. 
Tuhkanen, J. J. 
Westengren, C. W. 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Patrick McFee, who was cook on 
board the schooner "Robert Henry" 
on a voyage to Mexico last year, is 
inquired for by the U. S. Shipping 
Commissioner, at San Francisco, Cal. 

9-15-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



Union 



MADE 

Beer 




•Ale 



AND 

Porter 



^SS^ Of America ric^xp 

COPYRIGHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 
THIS IS OUK LABEL 



DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

Albers, George Krause, Otto 

Anderson, William Kuldsen, John 

Anderson, John Koster, Walter 

Anderson, Chris. Kottler, William 

Anderson, A. P. Kard, Hjalmar 

Andersen, Andrew Lindholm, John 
Andersen, Olaf -1118Lindgren, Ernst 

Bjerk, Gustav Lindroos, A. W. 

Bjerk, Geo. Lundkvist, Alarick 

Burmelster, T. Ludvigsen, Arne 

Bjorklund, G. Leedham, Max 

Benson, W. J. Lucey, James 

Bowman, C. McLeave, John 

Brogard, N. Munsen, Fred 

Bohn, Gus Nilsen, Harry 

Carlson, Adolf M. Nielsen, C. 

Carlson, Gustaf Nordman, Karl 

Carlson, Walter Olsen, W. 

Christiansen, Paaso, Andrew 

Dedrick Pettersen, Karl 

Crentz, P. Peterson, Nels 

Davis, Frank A. Peters. Walter 

Deam, James Peitsan, Jacob 

Donalson, Harry Pedersen, Alf 

Eriksen, Ole Risenius, Sven 

Grau, Aksil -1116 Rudt, Walter 

Gronros, Oswald Robertson, A. 

Gronlund, Oskar Scheftner, Bernhard 

-414 Sandgvist, Junnar 

Gueno, Pierre Stemvall, Sigurd 

Harley, Alex Sward, Arnold 

Holmroos, W. Scarabosio, M. 

High, Edward Skotel, A. 

Hansen, Ove Max Toves, H. C. 

Hansen, Jack Torin, Gustaf A. 

Hansen, Thorleif Windt, Walter 

Hylander, Gustaf Williams, T. C. 

Jensen, L. Waaler, Edgar 

Jensen, L. M. P. Wehrman, John 

John, F. Johanson Wagner, Ed. 

Johnsen, Walter Wedequist, Axel 
Johansen, A. Harry Packages. 

Johnson, Fred -1723 Benson, Charles 

Johansson, Arvo Houstor, Harry 
Johnson, Alexander 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Hans Nilson, a native of Tons- 
berg, Norway, was last heard from 
at Mobile, Ala., is inquired for by 
his mother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts kindly notify Louis 
Donald, Norwegian Vice Consul, 77 
St. Francis St., Mobile, Ala. 12-22-15 

Oscar Olsen, age 37, a native of 
Hallerna, near Gothenborg, Sweden, 
who was sailing on the Great Lakes 
about three years ago, is inquired 
for by John V. Olsen, Sun Com- 
pany, Marcus Hook, Pa. 5-26-15 

Hugo Carlson Ljung, age 29, a 
native of Gothenborg, Sweden, was 
last heard from in a Cable Boat on 
the Atlantic Coast, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify John Carl- 
son Ljung, Jungmansgatan 5, Goth- 
enborg, Sweden. 1-12-16 

Knut Jensen, No. 5018, a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, a 
native of Denmark, is inquired for 
by his wife, Lieschen Jensen, of 
Tangemunde, A/Elbe Ostenerweg, 
No. 7, Germany. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify the Lake 
Seamen's Union, 133 Clinton street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 4-14-15 



Port Townsend, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Paul Laux, American, age 23, 6 
feet tall, who was last heard from 
about 4 years ago at San Jose, Cal., 
supposed to be a sailor, is inquired 
for. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please' notify his father, Carl 
Laux, 112 E. 28th St., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 6-21-16 

Adolph Krakan, last heard of at 
Port Pirie, January, 1912, and again 
in March, 1913, from Warumbo, 118 
miles from Adelaide, South Australia, 
is inquired for by his mother at 
Hamburg, Germany. 8-25-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and 
blue eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Any information regarding Wilhelm 
Kuhme, age 27, a native of Germany, 
who was supposed to have been 
drowned in the wreck of the steam 
schooner "Francis H. Leggett," Sep- 
tember 18, 1914, will be thankfully re- 
ceived by the German Consul, San 
Francisco, Cal. 1-19-16 

Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from 
since 1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother, J. Marjama, 51 
South St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 

Bernard Baasen, a native of She- 
boygan, Wis., a former member of 
the L. S. U., who was last heard 
from at Milwaukee, Wis., April 29, is 
inquired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowmg his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. Sophie Baarsen, 561 Clinton 
street, Milwaukee, Wis. 7-5-16 



Home News. 



At a public hearing held by the 
Federal Farm Board at Lansing, 
Mich., the claim was made that in a 
large section of that State a farm 
loan is almost an impossibility unless 
a great bonus is paid. Counting 
these bonuses, some of the witnesses 
said, the average interest is 15 per 
cent., and payments exceeding 20 
per cent, are common. The Federal 
Farm Board, which was created by 
the recently enacted farm credits bill, 
intends to reduce these interest 
charges and permit farmers to secure 
money at rates no higher than 6 per 
cent. It is believed this figure will 
be greatly reduced. 

Ex-Governor Samuel W. Penny- 
packer of Pennsylvania died at his 
home at Schwenksville on Septem- 
ber 1, age 73. It was during his ad- 
ministration that a legislature con- 
trolled by Boss Quay passed a bill 
curbing the freedom of the press. 
Pennypacker signed the bill, but was 
compelled two years later through 
public indignation to call an extra 
session of the legislature to repeal 
this and other obnoxious measures. 
During his administration there also 
occurred the Pennsylvania Capitol 
scandal which resulted in sending 
several prominent machine politicians 
to the penitentiary. 

The recently incorporated Pennsyl- 
vania Shipbuilding Co., of Gloucester, 
N. J., laid the keel of a 7,000-ton oil 
tanker, the first vessel whose con- 
struction has been undertaken in that 
shipbuilding yard, which itself is not 
entirely completed, although suffi- 
ciently so to permit the beginning 
of ship construction. The yard, 
when completed, will be able to turn 
out four vessels a year. It consists 
of 25 acres adjoining the old Glou- 
cester racetrack. Eight vessels have 
already been contracted for. Henry 
Lycoming, formerly with the New 
York Shipbuilding Co., is general 
manager of the plant. 

The Surrogate Court of New York 
has ruled that Rockefeller's $100,000,- 
000 Foundation is a charitable institu- 
tion and cannot be taxed. State Con- 
troller Travis will appeal the deci- 
sion. He insists that under this 
ruling the Rockefellers, father and 
son, could turn over their billion- 
dollar fortune to the Foundation and 
thus escape taxation. The Rockefel- 
ler family controls the Foundation's 
board of trustees. The Foundation 
has been repeatedly attacked as a 
colossal attempt to control many ac- 
tivities, including education and free, 
thought, under the guise of "charity," 
and that because of its extended 
scope it should be controlled by law. 

The appointment of thirty acting 
ensigns yearly to be selected from 
the graduates of technical schools 
and colleges is one of the important 
provisions of the Naval Appropria- 
tion Act. The new officers will have 
special courses of instruction as stu- 
dent officers for one year and will be 
sent to sea for two years preliminary 
to final examination to determine 
their fitness for the Service. During 
the three years as acting ensign the 
Secretary of the Navy has authority 
to revoke the appointment of any 
officer appointed under this provi- 
sion, but after the final examination 
for junior lieutenant has been passed 
these officers will have the same sta- 
tus as other junior lieutenants in the 
Serviee. The pay of an ensign of 
the Navy at sea is $1,870 per year, 
on shore it is $1,700, plus allowances 
for quarters, heat and light. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The steamer "Samuel Blandford," 

which stranded at St. Mary's Cays, 
X. 1.. is nnc of the sealing steamers 
owned by Messrs. Job Brothers, of 

St. John. She was built in 1872, of 
919 tons, and is insured on a value 
of £6000. 

The United States naval collier 
"Hector," which broke in two during 
a recent hurricane off the South 
Carolina coast, is to be raised and 
reconstructed. The Navy Depart- 
ment announces that a contract for 
the work has been let. 

The 3-m schooner "James M. W. 
Hall," built for Rogers & Webb, 
Boston, ha^ been launched from !•". 
S. Bowker & Sons' yard at Phipps- 
burg, Mc. She is 157.7 feet long, 
.34/) feet beam and 14.2 feet depth 
of hold; gross tons, 572. 

It is said that shipbuilders arc 
compelled to continue hammering at 
steelmakers for supplies of plates. 
Foreign shipyards are also seeking 
stock in this country. Plates cannot 
be had f«,r less than 3c, Pittsburgh. 
at convenience of mill. 

The cruiser "Yankee," which lit- 
at the bottom of Buzzard Bay, near 
Penikese Island, is to be removed 
by the War Department. Specifica- 
tions for the work are being pre- 
pared. The "Yankee," in command 
of Captain C. C. Marsh, was im- 
paled on Spindle Rock during a 
heavy fog in 1909. 

The Norwegian steamer "Freda," 
which ran ashore on Alacran Reel 
June 29 during a voyage from New 
Orleans to Progreso, arrived here 
August 20 in tow of the Merritt 
& Chapman tug "Relief." The 
"Freda" was refloated August 7. She 
lost her rudder and her hull was 
damaged. 

Handkerchief lightship, one of the 
oldest guides to navigation in Nan- 
tucket Sound, is to be replaced by 
a modern light vessel about Novem- 
ber 1. The new lightship will have 
an iron framework tower amidships 
from which a light of 390 candle- 
power will shine. The light will be 
a flashing white every three seconds, 
and will be 40 feet above the water. 
The solicitor of the Department of 
Commerce has decided that the 
water- of the Cape Cod canal are 
navigable waters of the United 
States, and therefore come under 
navigation laws governing all other 
waters. The steamboat inspectors 
will have jurisdiction over all vessels 
using the canal, and will license 
pilots that take vessels through. Up 
to this time the owners of the canal 
held it to be a private enterprise, 
oxer which the Government had no 
jurisdiction. Licenses for pilots were 
issued by the canal owners up to 
now. 

Salvage operations for the refloat- 
ing of the tank barge "Detroit," at 
one time a United States cruiser, 
which was sunk August 24 off 
Kaighn's Point in the Delaware 
River after collision with the Clyde 
line steamship "Delaware," will be 
started soon. The barge, which 
had been towed from San Juan, 
P. R., with 350,000 gallons of" mo- 
lasses in her hold, is lying in fairly 
Shallow water 450 yards above the 
upper buoy of the Kaighn's Point 
anchorage, with about 25 feet of her 
mast showing at high tide. The 
"Detroit" was stricken from the 
navy register in 1910 and sold to 
the Henry A. Hitner Sons Company, 
of Kensington, the latter paying $20,- 
000 for the vessel. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

THE GERMAN BANK 
Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Hanks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. Corner Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30th, 1916 

Assets $63,811,228.81 

Deposits -------- 60,727,194.^2 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - 2,084, (U3. 89 

Employees' Pension Fund ----- 222,725.43 

Number of Depositors ------ 68,062 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
lost Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
1. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of tiieir destination. 

Abrahamsen, Berner Anderson, Ole 

Abraiiamsson, W. Anderson, Gustav 

Ahl, Elnar T. W. 

Ahokas, Ilmari Andersson, Eiick 

Albertsky, Fritz -1781 

Alexandeison, Paul Andersson, 

Alksen, Charlie Andersson, 

Amundsen, Aniund Andersson, 

Amundsen, Andrew Andersson, 

Andersen, C. -1716 Andresen, 
Andersen, Edward 
Andersen, George 

C. F. 

Ernst 
F. -332 



Johnson, John 

Johnson, Louis 

Johnson, N. 

Johnson, Nathaniel 

Johnson, Ole 



Anderson 
Anderson, 
Anderson 

An. I. is, ,n 
Anderson 



G. -1229 
L. H. 
J. A. 
S. A. 
A. -1635 
Antonsen, Marlus 
Apple, August 
Anis. Tobias 
Arndt, Paul 
Asterman, Oscar 
F. -1173 Aultomen, C. A. 
J. C. -1052 



Backstrom, Folke 
Baker, Clifford 
Balstad, 11. J. 
Baumeister, John 
Beahan, Edw. 
Bengtsson, John 
Berner, Albert 
Bemtsen, Julius 
Bertelson, 
Bey. O. 
Bjork, Rudolf 
Blum, M. B. 



Bock, James 
Bohm, August -1121 
Bolin, Charley 
Bahba, Komola 
Brenen, Wm. 
Brown, George 
Bucnanan, L. 
Buhler, Karl T. 
O. -2184 Bullock, Andrew 
-2248 Buse, Alfred 

Bushman, John 



Carey, A. L. 

'i. Frank 

u, Hans 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Carlsson, Gustav. 
Carlstrand, Gust 
Carroll, John J. 
Carter, Sidney 
Cassberg, Gustaf 
Cateches, Constan- 
tino 
Catt, Fred. 
Cavanagh, J. E. 
Creely, Tom 
Chamberlln, L. C. 
Christensen, Erling 

Dahlstrom, G. 
Dalgard, C. 
Dalley, P. 

Uanielsen, H. 
Danlelsen, N. 
Danielsen, Sigurd 
Oanielson, Dave 

Eckart, T. G. 
Eckstrom, George 

Kiehler, Karl 
Kklund, John 
Eliason, C. 
Ellis. B. 
Ellison, Sam 
EIricht, Fritz 
Engstrom, Edward 
Engstrom, Erik 

Fagerll, Ott. 
Ferguson, E. A. 
Fjellman, Georg 
Fredriksen, B. I >. 
Fredholm, C. J. 

Gabrielsen, EUing 
Gansor, Joe 
Gaupseth, Sigurd 
Gerner, Hans 
Grabover, Martin 



Christensen, 
Christensen, 
Christensen, 

Christensen, 
Christiansen, 



Hans 
Louis 

Tony 
Viggo 
L. P. 

N. 



Christiansen, 

-1093 

Christoffersen, Alb. 
Cirul, .\l. 
Clausen, Ingeman 
Conolly, Obirt 
Contreras, Julius 
Cook, Harry 
Crosby, J. 
Crosiglia, Guiseppe 

Davis, Frank E. 
De Klerk, D. -925 
I >e Hoos, J. 

..it. 'William 
De Vries, Albertus 
Diez, Th. Harry 
Donahue, It. r. 

Unliuan, Paul 
Ericson, Arthur 
Ericsson, M. P. a. 
Erikkila, Vilho 
Erikson, Neils 
Eriksen, Peder C. 
Evans, David 
Eugene, John 
Evensen, Louis 



M. 



Fredriksen, F. 
Fredrikson, H. 

Fritsch, Leonard 
Fugelutsen, Th. 

Graves, Edw. L. 
Gregersen, John 
Gregg, O. F. 
Grlel, Ben 
Gulbransen, Bjorn 



Gran, Akset -1116 Gundersen, Jacob 



Uranberg, Fred 
Granstrom, Nestor 
Grant, David 

Giant. Otto 
Graugaard, L. J. 

n, Jalk 
Hakansson, Ingvar 
Hallowes, L. N. 
llMnnus. Alex 
Carl 
C. M. 
Viggo 
William 
Marius 
M. -968 
Nikolav 
C. -967 
Charlie 
J. 



Hansen, 
I lansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hanson, 
i [anson, 
Hartog, 

Isaacson, Gustav Israelsen, Isak 



Gunther, R. -756 
Gunther, Ted 
Gustafsen, Olaf 
Gustafson, Axel 
Gutman, Paul 

Hedenskog. John 
Hellsten, A. H. 
Hellsten, G. -2168 
ll.nriksen, Charles 
Herlitz, Knud 
Hetherington, A. T. 
Hetman, Walter 
Hole, Sigvald 
Holm, Carl 
Holmstrom, David 
Holsen, Henry 
Housten, Robert 
Huntei QUI 
Huotari, J. 



Jacobs, Aug. 

Jacobsen, Alfred 

Jacobsen, G. E. 

Jakobsen, Jakob 

Jacobsen. J. 

Jacobs, Fred 

Jacobson, Carl 

Jacobson, Karl 

Jakobsen, Valdemar Johansson 

Jansson, F. J. 

Jenning, George 

Jensen, C. -2318 

Jensen. H. -1555 

Jensen, Henry 

Jensen, John F. 

Jensen, L. e. 

Johanesen. Hans 

.Tohannesen, Helge 

Johannesen, J. 

Johannessen, A. 

-1487 
Johannessen, C. J. 



Johansen, Fritz 
Johansen, Harry 
Johansen, Louis 
Johanson, J. 
Johanson, John 
Johanson, N. A. -280 
Johanson, C. -2407 
Johanson. J. -880 

. Bernard 
Johansson, Carl 
Johansson, I 
Johansson, J. R. 
Johansson, W. 
Johnsen, Jakob 
Johnson, C. -1300 

C, -2094 

Carl 

Dick 

Elees 

Ernst 

Evert 

I. 



Johnson, 

Johnson, 
Johnson 
Johnson 
Johnson, 
Johnson 
Johnson, 



Johnson, Pete 
Johnson, Sam 
Johnson, Sigurd 
Jordan. Henry S. 
Jorgensen, Robert 

Knuiisen, Conrad 
Knudsen, L. 
Knut, Alex 
Kolustoe, A. -1220 
Koster, E. 
Kretschmann, S. M. 
Kristensen, D. K. 



k, August 

-, W. -tibS 

i g, Arvid 
K&rgar, F. 
Karlson, Karl 
Karsten, Hugo 
Kasnlund, Franz 

Kaspersen, H. -HOOKroff, George 
Kelly, Patrick Kioon, P. 

Kirppin, Matti 
Kjell, John 
Klattenhoff, Hans 
Knappe, Adolph 
Knell, Alex 

Lalan, Joe 
l.antz, Gus 
Larsen, H. -1677 
Larsen, Johannes 
i^arson, Edward 
Lato, Edvard 
Law, John 
Leelkaln, M. 
Lemberg, A. 
Leroen, Lars 



Krlshjan, A, 

Kruit, Alex 
Kuger, Gustav 
Kuhn, John 
Kustel, Victor J. 



J. 



Lewis, Peter 
Liholm, Gustav 
Lindahn, A. 
Lindenau, E. 
Lindholm, Nels 

.Maas, R. A. 

Maata, John 
Mack, Edward 
-Marker, David 
Madseli, Georg 
Mangold, A. H. 
Mansfield, Hurry 



Lind, W. 
l.iii.lberg, 
Link, A. 
Lohne, Ed. 

I ins. ii, K. 

Luberg, Wm. 
Lulsten, Chas. 
Lundbcrg, Lorsten 
Lund, J. William 
Lund, l'eter 
Lunstedt, Chris. 
Lurtin, Paul 
Lutten, Theodore 
Lutzen, Walter 
Lynch, James 

Mathieson, Ludvig 
Matson, H. 
Mayers, Paul M. 
McCann, J. c. 
MeCusken, John 
McGlaslan, W. T. 
.M.Alanus, P. 



Mardlson, A. -1338 Melander, G. L. 
Markmann, Heinr. Meller, Hans 
Markmann, M. -1079Melson, William 
Markus, Bernhardt Mersman, A. 



Martensen, J. 

-2191 
Alartensen, O. 
.Mathews, R. 
Mathlson, Elnar 
Mathsen, Lewis 
Matheson, A. 
Matson, H. 
Martinez, A. 
Martin, H. 

Nelen, Alf 

.Nelson, Andy 
Nelson, Carl C. 
Nelson, Ed. 
Nelson, N. R. 
Nelsson, N. E. - 
Nerby, Kristian 
NewlJng, George 
Nielsen, Harold 
Nielsen, Hugo 
Nielson, H. J. 
Nikander, Einar 
Nilsen, Hans 



Meyerdierk, H. 
Mikalsen, Andreas 
Mogensen, C. 
Moller, Einar 
Moonan, Thomas 
Monsen, C. 
-Morris, O. R. 
Mulligan, Edward 
-Murphy, Geo. 
Myrhoj, J. P. 

Nilsen. H. L. 
Nilsen, N. E. -609 
Nilsen, Nils E. 
NilSSOn, Hilding 
NUsson, Reinhold 
552 Nord, Karl 
Nor, Niels P. 
North, N. P. 
Nowak, Andy 
Nurm, John A. 
Nutsen, Gus 
Nygren, Gus 
Nyman, Oskar 



Oberg, Mauritz 
Oberg, S. 
Okozln, -M. 
Olsen, A. -1303 

Adrian 

Albert 

C. A. 
Hans 

Herman 

J. 

John 

John 

L. E. 

i >. 

O. J. 



-1141 



Ulsen, 
Olsen, 

Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 
' ilsen, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 

Olsen, 



Olsen, O. P. 
Olsen, Oskar 
Olsen, O. I. 
Olson, Frank 
Olson, Oscar 
Olson, Otto 
l llsson, James 
( Usson, N. -502 

Opderbeck, Eugen 
Oseberg, Anskar 
Osolin, Oscar 
Osterhoff, H. 
Osternian, 081 

-1047 Overwick, Thomas 

-1020 



-1222 



Palken, G. 
I'almqulst, Albert 
Palquist, Albert 
Parsons, Herman 
Paulsen, James 
Paulsen, O. E. 
Pearson, J. A. 



Peterson, Chas. 
Peterson, F. 
Petersson, Robert 
Petersson, Robert T. 
Pettersen, Iljahnar 
Petterson, A. -1022 
Petterson, Einar 



Pedersen, Paul -S96 Peters, Martin 
Pederson, Charly Peters, M. -1713 
Pedersen, H. -1263 Pettersen. F. -1626 
Pedersen, H. S. Phillips, J. w. 

Pedersen, Krist Piemann, E. 

Pedersen, Kristian Plate. Diedriek 
n, Wm. Plottner. Alfred 

Pekman, E. Pool, M. 

Petersen, A. -1675 Post, W. S. 
Petersen, Christian Pottage, C. E. 
Peterson, A. 
Petersen, Aage 

Quinn, William 



Priehn, A. 
Cjunilan, Thos. 



Kahl. Willy 
Hamstad, Andreas 
Randropp, John 
Kasniusen, Emil 
Rasmussen 
Rasmussen 



Rasmussen. S. A. 
Reinink, H. 

Reinke, H. 

Reinhardt, Werner 
J. -446 Reinnold, Ernst 
Paul Richard, Fred 



k, II. -1162 
Rils, \. 
Ringdal, R. T. 
Rinkel, II. 

i.l, Soren 
Roalsen, Fred 
Robertson. A. 
Roden. Knut 

Sakarias 
Roglrson, Peter 

Sander, Otto 
Saari, A. 

Saarlnen, llenning 
Saarlnen, Konsti 
Samuelsen, I. 

Sandholm, KonraU 
Sandqvist, W. V. 

Sal in. C. 

i . ICrnst 
Bchauer, Wolf 
Bchlachte, Alfred 
Srhliemann. P. 
Schmidt, G. 
Schmidt, I. -2827 
Schmidt, Louis 
S.lmeider. E. 
Sehutt, W. 

Its, Fred 
Schwarsien, Wil- 
helm 

■ ini. Anton 

Johannes 

Selffert, L. 
Seland, A. 



Talken, G. 

Tamisar, P. 
Taube. August 
Tellcfssen. A. E 
Tennyson, F. 

gen, 
Thompson, G. E. 
Thompson, Peter 
Thompson, T. 



Bert 

g, N. 
Roster. Hugo 
Ruhr. Hans 

Rundqvlst, Oskar 

Runge. Charlie 
Rutsid, Fred 
Ryan. Patrick 
Rytko, Otto 



Semseter, Paul 
Skjoldenborg, F. P. 
Skold, c. a 
Sievers, G. P. 
Sillen, Georg. 
Simonsen, Oskar 
Smith. J. F. 
Smith, Max 
Smith, Wm. 
Snellman, Tor. 
Soderlund, Uno 
Sorensen, Viggo 
Sprogoe. Theodore 
St. Clair. Thomas 
Stein. Emil 
Stenharlt, John 
Strand, Louis 
Strandquist. Louis 
Strasdin, Paul 
Sument. J. 
Svenson, G. A. 
Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Swanson. C. -1050 
Swanson, J. N. 



Thorsen, Emil 
Thorstensen, B. 
Tonissen. P. -1009 
Topel. F. E. 
Torsen, Emil 
Helnrlch Torstenson, Folk 
Trondhjem. F. O. 
Tuck. Wm. 
Twede. J. 



Ulla, Charly 

Valfre, George 
Varnsquist. Ernst 
Veckenstedt, Wil- 
liam 
Vesgaard, Jens 
Vestvik, Ingolf 



John 
I. M. 



Waekrum, 
Wallgren, 

-1314 
Walters, H. J. 
Walter, J. 
Warier. Harold 
Werth, Gus 
Weber, Fred 
Wege, Willie 
Wendel, F.mil 

aid. Jens 
Werner, Chas. J. 
Wicklund. T. S. 

Zazan, George 
Ziehr. Ernst 
Zeritt. John R. 



Ulricks. Crltian 

Vickery, Curtis 
Villemayer, W. 
Virtonen, Chas. 
Van Frank, W. 
269 



WIckman, Peter 
Wikstrom, Anton 
Williams, Fred J. 
Williams. J. F. 
Williams. William 
Wills. George 
Wilson. George 
Winther, Hakon H. 
Wirak, A. 
Wischoropp, Fritz 
Wittenberg, Albert 
Wold. Theodore 
Wyllle, Jas. 

Zickermann, Hugo 
Zunk, Bruno 



PACKAGES. 

Felling, J. B. Olsen, O. J. -1020 

Conolly, O. Olsson, James 

Gjesdal. Elling Osterholm. J. W. 

Gunvaldsen, lngvald Opderbeck, Eugen 



Hanson. Chris 
Jansson, A. L. 
Jensen, Henry 
Kappla, Arthur 
Lornsen, Crist 
Lundquist, Frank 
Mathisen. H. 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsen, H. C. 



Pedersen. II. -1261 
Peningrud, L. 
Ramstad, Andreas 
Rarly, Frans 
Schlacht, Alfred 
Snellman, Tor 
1759 Wlemers. Herbert 
1101 Wikstrom, Carl 



Phones: 



Office, Franklin 7756 
Res., Park 6950 



Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 

Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 
Continental Building, on Second Floor 
San Francisco, Cal. 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



J. MILLER 

124 EAST STREET Garfield 690 

Union Store 

HATS, CAPS, 

FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

Suits Steam Cleaned, $1.50 



White Palace Shoe Store 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market, 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest 
Machinery. :: Work Called For and Delivered. 

WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



IS 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 
Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week, with all modern 
conveniences. Free Hot and Cold Shower 
Bath on every floor. Elevator Service. 
AXEL. LUNDGREN, Manager 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up, $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Garfield 833 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished Up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: 25, 30 and 
50 cts. per Day. $1.25 per "Week and Up. 
Free Baths — Large Reading Room 
1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



0. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

60 EAST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards. 
Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



JORTALLBROS.EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



16 FOLSOM STREET 

HOOKS gp 

Lumber, Crates, Rice, Sugar for all 
kinds of Stevedore Work. 

J. MAHER 



HULTEN $ RUDOLPH 



Formerly Cutter 
for Tom Williams 



Formerly Tailor 
for Tom Williams 

TAILORS 

SUITS TO ORDER 

CLEANING and PRESSING 

39 Sacramento Street Near Market 



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CLASSY CLOTHIER 
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UNIFORMS 



News from Abroad. 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



PHONE DOUGLAS 1082 
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Between Merchant and Washington 



g> iv Ji d~\. I***" i — t o c* See that this label < in Ught 

^^^ |^y| V 3 l^>. t~*!L>B^r A^I Dlue ) appears on the box in 

^■"^ ^"^ which you are served. 

Issued by Authority oi the Cigar Makeis' International union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

(Ihl5 Gprtlf IfS llut (he Cigars coniained inlhlS bo< Mve own made by a I IfttCI&S WorKM, 
aMtMEEROf IHt CICAR MAKERS 'iNIIRNAIiOrut UNION of America, an organiulim rje.oted tottiead- 
vjncemjnt o( the MGRAl MATlRlAland iiltuf ClUAl wtifARl Of THC CflATf. Therefore *e recommend 
these Cigars to all smokers throughout Trie world 

All Inlnngemenis upon this Label will be punished according to law 

^ 1/f. U2Asfcu*4, President, 

V C tf I V of Amend 




The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Resources. $7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Ginty 

S. Blssinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Tegatlet 

O. Bozio Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Plchon 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Seaberg, No. 2890, a native 
of Russia, age 30, and a member of 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, is 
inquired for by his wife. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. H. Seaberg, Gen. Del., Sac- 
ramento, Cal. 8-30-16 

Will John Baumcister, member of 
the Sailors' Union, will call at the 
office and receive a letter waiting for 
him there. 

Edward Beahan. a native of Cali- 
fornia, supposed in be sailing on the 
Lakes, is inquired for by his brother, 
J. J. Beahan, 2003 Chestnut street. 
Oakland, Cal. 5-10-16 

Eugene Martin, age 23, 6 feet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired fur by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin. 4231 15 N. E., Seattle. 
Wash 1-27-15 



PRACTICAL NAVIGATION 

Taught by a practical Navigator. Only 
a limited number of students will be 
accepted, as the teaching will be indi- 
vidual. For rates and other information 
Address, 

H. HEINKE 

NAVIGATION INSTRUCTOR 
Spain and 2d Streets Sonoma, Cal. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




■I ■■111 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 

Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 
and 

17 STEUART STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Proof. — Editor — Do you know how 
to run a newspaper? 

Applicant — Xo, sir. 

Editor — Well, I'll try you. T guess 
you have had experience. — Puck. 



P. C. (to festive gent) — Now, sir, 
what's the trouble? 

Festive Gent — I've lost me (hie) 
umbrella. 

P. C. — Why, it's hung on your 
arm, sir. 

Festive Gent — Sho it ish (hie). If 
you hadn't told me T should have 
gone (hie) home without it. 



Several members of a woman's 
club were chatting with a little 
daughter of their hostess. 

''I suppose you are a great help 
to your mania?" 

"Oh, yes," replied the little miss, 
"and so is Ethel; but to-day it is my 
turn to count the spoons after the 
company is gone." — Chicago Herald. 



Pat — Why is a sleepless man like 
a lawyer, Mike? 

Mike— Can't tell. 

Pat — Be jabers! Sure, he lies first 
OH the one side and then on the 
other, and he is wide awake all the 
time, and, faith! when he dies he 
lies still! 



The German submarine "U-20" en- 
tered the Lisbon harbor-mouth and 
attacked a Portuguese gunboat. The 
torpedo is stated by London to have 
missed its mark, and the U-boat sub- 
merged when the vessel opened fire 
on it. 

A new type of ship has arrived 
at Christiania, Norway, from the 
shipyards of Christiansfjord. The 
ship, which resembles a huge barge, 
is constructed entirely of concrete, 
except for the ribs, which are of 
steel. 

Woman suffrage and prohibition 
have been adopted by the voters of 
British Columbia, according to re- 
turns received from last week's gen- 
eral election. The Conservative Gov- 
ernment, headed by Premier W. J. 
Bowser, apparently was decisively 
defeated. The returns indicate that 
the Liberals will control the next 
Legislature 33 to 14. 

Violation of American neutrality 
by a British torpedoboat, which held 
up and examined the Philippine 
steamer "Cebu" within the territorial 
waters of the Philippines, was re- 
ported to the United States War 
Department by Governor-General 
Harrison. The dispatch immediately 
was transmitted to the State Depart- 
ment and will be made the subject of 
a vigorous protest to Great Britain. 

Lieutenant Sir Ernest H. Shackle- 
ton landed at Punta Arenas, Chile, 
with the remainder of his crew who 
had been marooned on Elephant 
Island in the Antarctic since April 16. 
This successful rescue of the 22 men 
by means of the small steam trawler 
"Yelcho," was the fourth attempt of 
Lieutenant Shackleton. The men 
were well, and still had food, but had 
abandoned hope of relief, believing 
their commander had been lost, and 
that the world was unaware of their 
plight. 

Disturbing reports of conflicting in- 
terests of China and Japan are at 
hand. As a result of the clash be- 
tween the Chinese and Japanese 
troops at Cheng Chiatun, in which 
a number on both sides were killed, 
Lilian has made severe demands 
upon her neighbor. These demands 
are said to include the dismissal of 
Chinese officers in command of the 
troops at the scene of the trouble, 
the withdrawal of the Chinese garri- 
son, the indemnification of the fami- 
lies of the Japanese killed, and the 
extension of Japanese police rights 
to inner Mongolia. Coincident with 
these demands is the offer of the 
Japanese Government to lend China 
$30,01 10,000. 

Honors were almost equally di- 
vided in the reports of last week's 
lighting. The allies made substantial 
gains in their western campaign and 
in one region they were successful 
with their Balkan operations; but 
these advantages were well nigh off- 
set by the masterly triumph scored 
by Mackensen on the Danube against 
the Roumanians. As though with an 
rye to dramatic effect, and certainly 
with a line appreciation of diplomatic 
and military possibilities, the Ger- 
mans concentrated their superior war- 
riors and artillery at a point cal- 
culated to demoralize the Rouman- 
ians. A gain of thirty miles was 
made, and at this writing it seems 
as though the advance will be 
crowned with the capture of the 
Russian forces assisting the Rou- 
manians in that area. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits. 



As She Saw It.— Maid— Is this 
paper from Mr. Scribbler's room 
waste paper, mum? 

Landlady— No. He hasn't written 
anything on it yet. — Judge. 



The Unsafe Safe.— Willis (ready 
for school)— Mama, they are hoisting 
up a safe down the street. 

Mother— Well, be careful not to 
walk on the safe side.— Boston Tran- 
script. 



Easily Remedied. — He (with a 
sigh)— I have only one friend on 
earth — my dog. 

She— Well, if that isn't enough, 
why don't you get another dog?— 
Indianapolis Star. 



Her Opinion.— Husband— I wonder 
why all the misers we read about 
are old bachelors? 

Wife— Oh, married misers are so 
common they are not worth mention- 
ing. — Indianapolis Star. 

He Stuck to the Truth.— She- 
How did you dare tell father that 
you have a prospect of $50,000 a 
year. 

He— Why, I have, if I marry you. 
—Boston Transcript. 



Far Outnumbered.— Jasper— Many 
a wise word is spoken in jest. 

Jumpuppe— Yes, but they can't 
compare with the number of foolish 
ones that are spoken in earnest.— 
Life. 



The Best of Reasons— Mrs. Par- 
ker — Now, young man, why aren't 
you at the front? 

Young Man (milking cow)— 'Cos 
there ain't any milk that end, missus! 
—Tit-Bits. 



Just Like Politics— Aunt— You'll 
be late for the party, won't you, 
dear? 

Niece— Oh, no, auntie. In our set 
nobody goes to a party until every- 
elsc gets there.— Boston Tran- 
script. 



An Invitation 

We invite deposits from every one — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 





Union Label of the 
UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are 
?# counterfeits. 

resident MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary-Treasurer 

72-73 Bible House, New York City 



JOHN W. SCULLEY, P 
Rooms 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 
NOTICE! BOSS OF ROAD 
OVERALLS— PRICE, 80 CENTS 

Phone Douglas 1737 



Demand the Union Label 



Did you ever stop to think that 
there is from one-half to one ounce 
more Tobacco in the 10c Pouches 
GOLD SHORE CUT PLUG 
SMOKING than in the advertised 
10c tins, and not any better Tobacco 
grows than the BAGLEY CO. put 
in GOLD SHORE. Why buy tin 
cans to throw away, when the pouch 
is so much more practical as a pocket 
package, and contains more Tobacco? 



Christensen's Navigation School 

Established 1906 

ON AND AFTER JAN. 1, 1916, CHRISTENSEN'S NAVIGATION SCHOOL 
WILL BE LOCATED AT ROOM 242, HANSFORD BUILDING 
ENTRANCE AT 25 CALIFORNIA AND 268 MARKET STS. 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 





fcJO/gj) 



Upholding American 
PROSPERITY 




The key to Prosperity Is Saving! 
So make up your mind to prosper 
hy buying one of Hale's $1.00 Banks 
for only 50c. It is the best possible 
way to teach the children thrift and 
the vital principles of saving. We 
keep the key, and you can only open 
the Bank by bringing It to Hale's. 
Do what you wish with the money. 
Banks on Sale at Transfer Desk. 




LVNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 

in 4 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



H. SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 

FURNISHING GOODS 



693 THIRD STREET, San Francisco 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BCD SEAL CHAD CO., MANUrVU TUBEfiS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



WE HAVE NO BRANCH STORES— ONLY ONE BIG STORE 
Watch Repairing Guaranteed Two Years 

The Popular Price Jewelry Store 

715 MARKET STREET Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



UIVIOIN 



j@T -ro taori gyttiAutMnty of tho <-o- « 

I JDUOD WORXIIU >?S§8v IKTERHHIDNAL 

"fTlfcl rVlA.r»B 




Jewelers, WatchmaKers and 
Opticians 



"YOUR HATTER" 
FRED AMMANN 



72 MarKet Street 
San Francisco 



Union Hats 



James 3t. Sorense/t 

U&93. and Crcajj 

Everything Bought or Repaired at Our Store is Positively Guaranteed 



OHflBUSFErl 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



S 





c u 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXX, No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1916. 



Whole No. 2401. 



RECORDS OF WILS ON AND HUGHES. 

The Plain Truth About the Candidates of the Two Old Parties. 



The American Federation of Labor has, since 
its inception, declared for the independent use of 
the ballot by the workers. During the early 
years of its history there was no organized effort 
to direct the political power of the workers in 
furtherance of the general purposes and interests 
of the whole movement. Later, a more definite 
policy became necessary because of the follow- 
ing grave conditions: There was urgent need of 
remedial legislation to insure to workers the 
fundamental rights of free men, and the con- 
tinued refusal of Congress to enact or even to 
consider laws demanded by the workers bad to 
be vigorously opposed to bring about a change 
of congressional policy on labor legislation. The 
National Association of Manufacturers, in addi- 
tion to fighting organized labor in the economic 
field, maintained a powerful-, corrupt lobby at 
Washington, to defeat all legislation in the in- 
terests of the wage-earners. Members of the 
judiciary had developed the practise of using 
writs of injunction intended to protect property 
interests only, to defeat movements among the 
workers to secure better conditions of work 
and higher wages by means of strikes. In order 
to secure cooperation in a strike movement, it 
is necessary to communicate the causes and 
purposes of the strike to fellow-workers and 
the public. Injunctions issued in industrial dis- 
putes contained prohibitions which deprived 
workers of their constitutional rights as free 
citizens, including the right of free speech, free 
press, the right of peaceful assemblage, the right 
to walk on highways and thoroughfares, as well 
as other rights accorded them by law. 

Because of these conditions in 1906 the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor adopted its present 
political policy, a policy based upon independent 
use of the ballot by workers and directed against 
those hostile to the interests of the wage-earners 
and in support of those favorable to Labor's 
interests. The American Federation of Labor 
sounded the political slogan — "Reward your 
friends, defeat your enemies." 

Accordingly, the Labor Representative Com- 
mittee of the A. F. of L. has supplied the Labor 
press with the following self-explanatory data: 

Washington, D. C, Aug. 28, 1916. 
Mr. Tf. O. McClurg, 

Secretary Labor's Volunteer Cooperative 
Citizenship and Educational Committee, 
P. O. Box 479, 
Birmingham, Alabama. 
Dear Sir and Brother: 

Your favors of July 17 and July 26 addressed 
to Mr. Frank Morrison, Secretary of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, have been turned over 
to us for reply. In your favor of July 17 you 
ask : 

"Will you kindly give us the labor record of 
the candidates who are offering for the Presi- 
dency of the United States. Our committee 
investigates the record of all men who offer for 
public office in which Labor is interested. These 
records arc all compiled and then given to the 
membership of Organized Labor without com- 



ment whatever, allowing the members to select 
according to the record that the various candi- 
dates have made themselves." 

Replying to the above query and statement, 
we feel it is due you and the members of your 
organization to say that in our opinion you have 
taken the correct attitude and if you maintain 
your service on a rigid non-partisan basis, such 
as you describe, you will find that the influence 
of your organization \\-ill always prove helpful 
to the best interests of all the people. 

The legislative record of the Honorable 
Woodrow Wilson, Democratic nominee for 
President, in regard to labor measures that have 
come before him for action during his incum- 
bency in the office of President, since .March 4, 
1913, is as follows: 

President Wilson's Record. 

One of the first acts of the President — on 
March 4, 1913 — was to appoint a member in 
good standing of the trade union movement, 
Honorable William B. Wilson, a member and 
former secretary of the United Mine Workers 
of America, Secretary of the Department of 
Labor, thereby making him -a member of the 
President's Cabinet. This is the first instance 
in the history of the United States where the 
President of the United States selected a bona 
fide good standing member of the organized 
labor movement to become a member of his 
Cabinet. 

At the request of the Executive Council of 
the American Federation of Labor President 
Wilson appointed, on September 10, 1913, repre- 
sentatives of the American Federation of Labor 
and the Railroad Brotherhoods as members of 
the Industrial Relations Commission, Mr. James 
O'Connell, vice-president of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor; Mr. John B. Lennon, treas- 
urer of the American Federation of Labor, and 
Mr. Austin B. Garretson, grand chief conductor 
of the Order of Railroad Conductors. 

On October IS, 1914 — President Wilson ap- 
proved the law which takes the organizations of 
Labor and the Farmers' organizations from the 
purview of the Anti-trust Act; limits the use and 
prevents the abuse of the writ of injunction in 
labor disputes; defines and restricts punishment 
for alleged contempts of injunction writs and 
provides jury trial in contempt cases. 

On June 23, 1913 — The law prohibiting the 
Department of Justice from using anti-trust 
appropriation funds to prosecute Labor anil 
Farmers' organizations under the Anti-trust Act, 
was approved. 

On August 1, 1914 — The same was again ap- 
proved. 

On March 3, 191 S — The same was approved. 

On March 4, 191 S — The President approved 
the Seamen's Law, which abolishes involuntary 
servitude, provides better treatment of s< -amen 
and improves the life-saving provisions on ves- 
sels at sea. 

On July 15, 1913 — The old conciliation, media- 
tion and arbitration act was repealed, and the 
new law enacted with permanent officials ap- 
pointed to administer it in behalf of railroad 
employees engaged in operating service- 
On February 24, 1914 — The Eight-hour Law 



was enacted for women and child workers of 
the District of Columbia. (Decided Constitu- 
tional March 13, 1915, by the Supreme Court of 
the District of Columbia.) 

.On October 20, 1914— The Eight-hour provi- 
sion was approved for employees under the 
Alaska Coal Land Act. 

On March 12, 1914— The law providing for 
public construction of the Alaska railroad. 

On May 8, 1914 — Industrial Education provided 
with appropriations for farmers and rural resi- 
dents under the Agricultural Extension Act 

On March 4, 1915— The Taylor System, stop- 
watch and speeding-up methods in the United 
States arsenals prohibited. 

On March 3, 1915— The Taylor System, stop- 
watch and speeding-up methods in the United 
States Navy Yards, gun factories and torpedo 
stations prohibited. 

On March 9, 1914 — Piecework was prohibited 
in the Post Office Department, Washington, 
D. C. 

On March 3, 1915— Public construction of 
battleships, transports and other vessels in U. 
S. Navy Yards extended. Repairs to vessels 
of the Navy to be made in Governmental in- 
stead of private yards. Steadier work assured 
to employees of Government navy yards. 

On March 3, 1915 — Licensed officers, such as 
masters, mates and pilots, guaranteed right to 
quit, and protected when reporting defects of 
their vessels to Government inspectors. 

On March 3, 1915 — Bureau of Mines Act ex- 
tended and strengthened. Ten new experiment 
stations and seven new safety stations provided. 

On May 28, 1913 — Senatorial investigation of 
industrial dispute in the coal fields of West 
Virginia, whereby peace was restored; the cight- 
hour day secured; check weighmen provided, and 
10 per cent, increase in wages gained — right of 
organization guaranteed and other improved 
working conditions included. 

On March 9, 1914 — Compensation for Injuries 
Act extended to Post Office employees. 

On March 4, 1915 — Post Office employees — 
annual promotion maintained, notwithstanding 
the Postmaster General's efforts to substitute 
biennial for annual promotions. 

On March 4, 1915— Fight-hour law for Post 
( Iffice clerks and carriers retained, notwithstand- 
ing the effort of the Postmaster General to 
i hange radically. 

On March 4. 1915 — Letter Carriers' salaries 
restored, notwithstanding the effort of the Post- 
master General to reduce the pay of letter car- 
riers, known as collectors, from $1200 to $1000 
per year. 

On March 4, 1915 — Locomotive Boiler In- 
spection Act extended to cover locomotive en- 
gines and tenders. 

On March 4, 1915 — Leave of absence with pay 
to employees of Government Printing On 
extended from 26 to 30 days per year. , 

On January 28, 1914 — Special Congressional 
investigation of industrial disputes in the Colo- 
rado coal fields and the Michigan copper region, 
wherein all of the complaints and charges made 
by the imn of labor against the mining com- 
panies and the alliance of these companies with 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



the political and military powers of the States 
were officially verified and substantiated. 

On March 3, 1915— An additional annual appro- 
priation of $240,000 for the years 1914-15 was 
provided for the payroll of the metal trades 
mechanics employed at the Washington, D. C, 
Navy Yard. This was equivalent to a 7.81 per 
cent, increase in wages. 

On December 17, 1914— The statutory enact- 
ment of an income tax in conformity with the 
t United States constitutional amendment. 

( in Julv 16, 191-1 — An additional appropriation 
of $139,000 for the work of the Children's 
Bureau. 

On July 16, 1914 — More adequate appropria- 
tions for the Department of Labor to carry on 
its work. 

On June 15, 1914 — Prevented a reduction in 
wages and installation and collection of rents 
for employees on the Panama Canal Zone. 

On May 4, 1916— The President approved the 
amendment to the Hours of Service Act (the 
sixteen-hour law for railroad men), containing 
a minimum and maximum penalty for violation 
of same by railroad companies. 

On May'10, 1916— The President approved the 
Legislative Appropriations Bill after the ob- 
jectionable Borland Amendment, which was for 
the purpose of lengthening the workday of 
government employees without extra compensa- 
tion and without arranging for overtime rates, 
had been stricken from the bill. 

On July 1, 1916 — The President approved the 
Sundry Civil Appropriation Bill which carries 
with it the Anti-Taylor System proviso. 

On July 6, 1916— President Wilson approved 
the Fortifications' hill which carries with it the 
important provision which prohibits the use of 
the inhuman Taylor System in Government 
workshops. 

On July 17. 1916 — An act to provide capital 
for agricultural development, to create standard 
forms of investment based upon farm mortga 
to equalize rates of interest upon farm loans, 
to furnish market for United States bonds, to 
create Government depositaries and financial 
agents for the United States, and for other 
purposes, 

On July 28, 1916— The Post Office Appropria- 
tion Bill was approved. This bill contains 
provisions improving the conditions of letter 
carriers, clerks and other Post Office employees. 

There are several other important labor meas- 
ures upon the calendars of both Houses, which, 
if passed, it is confidently expected he will also 
approve. 

On July 4, 1916 — On the occasion of the dedi- 
cation of the American Federation of Labor 
office building in Washington, D. C, President 
Wilson delivered an inspiring address from 
which I quote in part, as follows: 

"No man ought to suffer injustice in America. 
No man ought in America to fail to see the 
deep dictates of humanity. 

"Mr. Gompers was referring just now to the 
sixth section of the Clayton Anti-trust Law, 
the section in which the obvious is stated; 
namely, that a man's labor is not a commodity, 
but a part of his life, and that, therefore, the 
courts must not treat it as if it were a com- 
modity, but must treat it as if it were part of 
his life. I am sorry that there were any judges 
in the United States who had to be told that. 
It is so obvious that it seems to me that that 
section of the Clayton Act were a return to the 
primer of human liberty; but if judges have 
to have the primer opened before them, I am 
willing to open it." 

Students of history may search wide and deep, 
they may spend many years of keen research 
and nowhere in the pages of American history 
will they find a clearer and more definite pro- 
nouncement in behalf of real, human liberty 
than the above expression by President Wood- 
row Wilson on July 4, 1916. 

Justice Hughes' Record. 

You also ask for the record of the Honorable 
Charles Evans Hughes, Republican nominee for 
President, as to labor measures, and particularly 
as to the Danbury Hatters' case. 

The Danbury Hatters' case has an historical 
place in Labor's struggle for freedom. It was 
in the course of the trial of this case that the 
workers of our country finally succeeded in 
securing a declaration from the highest court of 
the land as to the application of anti-trust 
legislation to associations of wage-earners. 

The decision of the court in this case involved 
a principle of fundamental importance to work- 
ers. It was the same principle involved in the 
abuse of the writ of injunction which, under the 
perversion by judges, who had no understand- 
ing of industrial conditions and the labor of 
human beings, had been transformed into an 
agency at the service of employers who wished 
to restrict the industrial freedom of their em- 
ployees and to prevent their using legitimate 
methods of securing their demands and pro- 
moting their welfare. 

The theory upon which courts have held 
that anti-trust legislation applied to associations 
of wage-earners and that injunctions could be 
used to regulate industrial relations, which are 
personal relations, was the assumption that the 
labor of a human being was an article _ or a 
commodity and, therefore, property. This as- 
sumption recognizes no distinction between the 
creative labor power of a human being which is 



inseparable from his living body and the articles 
which he produces. 

In 1908 the Supreme Court of the United 
States rendered a decision in the Hatters' case 
when the initial appeal was made. 

In 1914 the United States Supreme Court de- 
livered their final decision in the case and sus- 
tained the contentions of the lawyers of the 
Anti-Boycott Association which instigated suit 
against the Hatters in the name of the D. E. 
ompany, hat manufacturers of Danbury, 
necticut. 

court sustained the position that the 
Sherman Anti-trust Law applied to the personal 
attributes and normal activities of human beings. 
They held to the theory that there was no dis- 
tinction between the labor power of human 
beings on the one hand and articles or commodi- 
ties on the other — articles or commodities which 
sought to control and manipulate through 
trusts. This decision threatened the very ex- 
istence of voluntary associated effort — the effort 
of the organized workers to carry out the nor- 
urposes for which they were organized; 
that is, to improve standards of life and work, 
, hours and conditions of employment. 
Such activities of the workers were, by the de- 
cision of the Supreme Court of the United 
States, regarded as liable to all the civil and 
criminal penalties under the anti-trust laws of 
the United States. In other words, the Sherman 
Anti-trust Law, enacted to curb the stupidity 
and machinations of the combinations of wealthy 
owners, was to be applied to the voluntary or- 
ganization of the workers instituted for bene- 
ficent purposes and the welfare of human beings. 

The decision in this case, which is known as 
Locwc vs. Lawlor, declared that the damages in 
the case were $80,000 which, under the provisions 
of the Sherman Anti-trust Act, were tripled, 
ami together with the costs of the case and the 
interest, made a total sum of over $300,000, 
which the Danbury Hatters must pay D. E. 
Loewc & Company. 

Mr. Charles Evans Hughes was a Justice of 
the United States Supreme Court at the time 
this decision was rendered, and he concurred in 
decision. 

The last decision in this case, although it is 
brief, reaffirms all that the Court declared in 
their 1908 opinion. 

There is another opinion of the United States 
Supreme Court, written by Justice Hughes, 
which throws light upon his attitude upon this 
principle, which is of fundamental importance to 
tin workers of the country. It is his opinion 
in the case of Truax vs. Raich, a case which 
involved the constitutionality of the Arizona 
anti-alien law. Lender that law all employers of 
Arizona who employed more than five workers 
were forbidden to employ less than 80 per cent, 
who were qualified electors or native born citi- 
zens of the United States. In that decision 
Justice Hughes took the position that the in- 
junctive process applied to personal relations. 

Justice Hughes on that occasion and in that 
decision made more definite his endorsement of 
the theory that injunctions apply to personal 
relations. 

Mr. Hughes has taken an unequivocal posi- 
tion. He endorses the abuse of the writ of 
injunction against which wage-earners have 
vigorously protested, and which they have tried 
to correct by remedial legislation in order that 
they might enjoy the rights and opportunities 
of free citizens. 

The above is accurately the information for 
which you asked and we take it that it will he 
of importance to vou, as well as to the working 
people and liberty-loving citizens all over the 
country, in enabling them to understand the 
mental attitude and the action of both President 
'row Wilson and Honorable Charles Evans 
Hughes who are now candidates for the Presi- 
dency of the United States. 
Fraternally vours. 

SAM'L. GOMPERS. 

President. 
J AS. O'CONNELL, 

Vice-President. 
FRANK MORRISON. 

Secretary. 

Labor Representation Committee American 
Federation of Labor. 



CONFISCATORY TAXES? 



FREE LAND AND HIGH WAGES. 



So long as land was to be had (in the 
West) almost for the mere asking, at no 
cost except that of the journey and of a 
few farmer's tools and a beast or two for 
the plow, the active men of New England, 
whom (the manufacturers) counted on as 
skilled workmen, must be constantly en- 
ticed away by the score and hundred to 
seek an independent life and livelihood in 
the West. High wages, very high wages, 
must be paid to keep them. — From Wood- 
row Wilson's "History of the American 
People," Vol. TV, p. 22. 



A gentleman occupying a government 
position objects to the Single Tax as fol- 
lows : 

"I own 4,080 acres of timber and agricul- 
tural land in Virginia, on which my family 
have paid taxes since 1726, at tremendous 
personal sacrifices. My taxes on this land 
are now confiscatory or nearly so." 

The man who urges his personal interest, 
real or imaginary, as an objection to a 
proposition for the general good, can not 
complain if others urge their interest as an 
argument the other way. His argument 
amounts to this : 

"I don't care if land monopoly is creating 
poverty, distress, vice and crime. I own 
4,080 acres of land, and if I must be made 
to let go in order to remedy the situation, 
then I don't want it remedied." 

Such selfishness is shortsighted. It is 
bettor to live under conditions where every 
one has at all times the opportunity to earn 
a living, than to own 4,080 acres under 
conditions which may at any time deprive 
one of such a chance. 

It appears that this family having for 
190 years held on to land which they did 
not use, in the hope of finally making 
others pay them a profit for the privilege 
of using it, object to having their hold 
broken at this late day. 

It is certain that had the Single Tax 
been in operation since 1726 this family 
would be better off. Its members would 
have been spared the tremendous personal 
sacrifices and confiscatory taxes required 
to hold on, for they would not have held. 
But the land would have remained just 
where it is and any time this gentleman or 
any of his ancestors had wanted to use it 
the opportunity would have been and still 
would be theirs without tremendous sacri- 
fices or any more taxes than the opportu- 
nity would be worth. If this land had been 
occupied and used by others in the mean- 
time there would be plenty other land open 
just as good. 

But such conditions would offer no 
chance to levy toll on industry, and it is 
much to be feared that it is in the hope 
of yet being able to do that, that our cor- 
respondent objects to the Single Tax, and 
holds on in spite of taxes which he feels 
to be "confiscatory or nearly so." But 
does not the public good require abolition 
of such power to take without adequate 
return, wealth produced by others? 

The gentleman's argument is like that 
of one who has sat all night at a poker 
game and continually lost, but who objects 
to breaking up of the game in the hope 
that a new victim might drop in from 
whom he might win. It would be better 
for all concerned that the police raid the 
game. 



THE REAL BUCCANEERS! 



Who held up the country? The ninety 
leading railroad companies who realized 45 
per cent, increase in net earnings for the 
first half of 1916 and refused to give their 
men any share in the prosperity unless the 
President would guarantee the companies 
an increase in freight rates. The holdup 
was attempted by the Buccaneers of Big 
Business, and Congress called their bluff. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



New York Car Men Strike. 

Because of an attempt by New York- 
street railroad managers to destroy the re- 
cently organized Street Car Men's Union, 
the surface street car system in New York 
has been completely tied up the past week, 
while transportation on the numerous ele- 
vated lines and on the net work of subway 
railroads has been badly crippled. The 
strike vote was taken Wednesday, Septem- 
ber 6, and affected the Interborough Rapid 
Transit Company and the New York Rail- 
ways Company — two companies with the 
same officials. Later the strike spread to 
other lines and northward into Westchester 
County. 

The direct cause of the strike was the 
attempt of the Interborough, controlling the 
individual contract on its employes binding 
individual contract on it semployes binding 
them not to strike for two years or to take 
part in any movement having for its pur- 
pose a betterment of conditions during this 
period. Officers of the company have stated 
that any violation of this agreement "would 
be subject to discipline," and would also 
result in a suit for damages, which would 
be brought against the individual employe 
by the company. The Street Car Men's 
Union demanded that the company return 
these agreements and cease issuing bulle- 
tins containing the information that any 
employe who objected to the agreement 
would be discharged. The company replied 
that the men could sue in court as indi- 
viduals, if they believed they were 
wronged. 

When the strike started President Shonts 
of the New York Railways and Inter- 
borough companies announced that it was 
"a fight to the finish." James L. Quacken- 
bush, general counsel for the latter com- 
pany, said : "If there are enough blue- 
coats and brass buttons and a few night 
sticks — not revolvers — where they are 
needed, the strike won't last long." 

But the response by organized labor sur- 
prised Shonts, who later assured the pub- 
lic that his fight "was not against union- 
ism." 

President Gompers has been in consulta- 
tion with local trade unionists during the 
week discussing means that will be helpful 
to the strikers. 

During one of the hearings before the 
Public Service Commission General Man- 
ager Frank Hedley, of the Interborough, 
admitted that the company had broken its 
word with its employes by refusing to sub- 
mit to arbitration any question that might 
arise. For more than half an hour the 
traction official endeavored to avoid a di- 
rect answer to the question. Step by step, 
however, he was forced to admit that he 
had given his word to his employes that 
the basis of settlement of the recent strike 
on the New York Railways would be 
accepted by him and that that strike settle- 
ment included arbitration provisions. 



corn found it convenient to employ union 
iron workers on the State house extension, 
but the housesmiths demanded that the 
company employ unionists on other work. 
This was refused and when the State house 
job was struck the company rushed to 
Judge Fox for an injunction. 

The court was also asked to order the 
union officers to declare the State house 
strike off and order the men back to work. 
He refused on the ground that there is no 
precedent for such an order in this State, 
but he indicated that an order of this char- 
acter was not impossible and that, if neces- 
sary, such an order might be issued. 

The statement shows the methods in- 
junction judges will employ. 



St. Louis Drivers Enjoined. 

Striking milk wagon drivers of St. Louis 
have been enjoined by Circuit Judge An- 
derson, who commands these workers not 
to attempt to induce strikebreakers to quit 
their jobs. 

The strikers are also ordered not to use 
threats, intimidation, personal violence or 
other means "intended to terrorize and 
alarm." 

While the statutes makes ample pro- 
vision for the trial and punishment of any 
person who threatens, intimidates or uses 
violence, an injunction has especial value 
as a strikebreaking process. 

When a workingman is charged with 
violation of law, when no strike exists, he 
is assumed to be innocent until proven 
guilty and is accorded a jury trial. Under 
the injunction process, however, it is only 
necessary for the employer, or his attorney, 
to claim a striker has intimidated or used 
violence. The striker is then ordered to 
appear before the judge who issued the 
injunction and prove that he is innocent. 
He is denied a jury trial and is assumed 
to be guilty until he proves' the contrary. 

Because trade unionists are demanding 
equality before the law when they are 
striking to improve working conditions, 
they are wrongfully charged with demand- 
ing a license to destroy property and with 
asking for special privileges. 

Workers oppose injunctions because 
these writs, issued in times of strike, sus- 
pend trial by jury, reverse the accepted rule 
that a man is innocent until proven guilty 
and permit a judge, acting as lawmaker, 
jurist and executioner, to suspend every 
constitutional guaranty. 



Iron Workers Enjoined. 
Judge Fox of the Superior Court in Bos- 
ton has enjoined Housesmiths and Bridge- 
men's Union No. 7 from interfering with 
the W. S. Snow Iron Works. This con- 



Sorry Strike is Averted. 

"It looks like they are sorry the strike 
was averted," said Congressman Adamson, 
author of the eight-hour law for railroad 
men, in discussing the claims of opponents 
of this legislation in the House of Repre- 
sentatives. 

"In the first place," he said, "it is not 
true that the act fixes wages. That state- 
ment is gratuitous and inconsiderate. The 
law fixes an eight-hour day. We had pre- 
viously a 16-hour day and a nine-hour day. 
We now have an eight-hour day. The only 
reference to wages is in the language used 
to hold in statu quo until the workings of 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 
National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 
Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 
Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 
Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
Leiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

A .malgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road. 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The Canadian Foundrj Comp: 
of Toronto, Ontario, has abandoned 

its trade union hostility and con- 
cedes the nine-hour day to Striking 
machinists, who are recognized for 
the first time. 

The British minister of munitions 
announces that he has made further 
orders under the munitions of war 
acts, 1915 and 1916, under which 124 
additional establishments have been 
declared controlled establishments. 
The total number of controlled es- 
tablishments under the munitions of 
war acts, 1915 and 1916, is now 
4052. 

From the very beginning of the 
war the German mining industry has 
been very seriously handicapped by 
shortage of labor, and female labor 
is being exploited on an increasing 
scale It is now stated that the 
number of female hands employed 
in the mining industry of Germany 
amounts to 45,500, against 550 
the beginning of the war. 

The August issue of the Briti-h 
Labor Gazette reports that the sup- 
ply of seamen and firemen for mer- 
cantile ships during July was not 
quite equal to the demand. From 
South Shields it w-as reported that 
the supply of seamen and firemen 
was again in excess of the demand; 
on the other hand, some shortage of 
seamen was reported from North 
Shields, Southampton, Bristol, Avon- 
mouth, Penarth, Liverpool, and Lon- 
don, except at Dock street. 

Cigarmakcrs employed by the 
I'orto Rican American Tobacco Com- 
pany at San Juan, Porto Rico, arc 
on strike for higher wages and be- 
cause the company violated an agree- 
ment signed June 9, 1914. This con- 
cern, known as "the trust,'' has re- 
duced wages and attempted to force 
an agreement on employes which 
would deny them the right to strike. 
The workers are also asked to con- 
tribute 50 cents a week to a so- 
called trade union conducted along 
the lines of Rockefeller's "union" in 
Colorado, and whose treasurer is the 
manager of the cigar company. 
About 6000 cigarmakers, tobacco 
strippers and other employes are af- 
fected by the strike. 

That the workers of Great Britain 
do not intend to be caught unpre- 
pared at the close of the war is 
evidenced by the policy which will 
be outlined at the session of the 
Trade Union Congress which meets 
in September. Their plan of "pre- 
paredness" on the industrial field 
will include compulsory trade union 
membership, compulsory eight-hour 
day for all trades, minimum wage 
scales and universal state unem- 
ployment pay. In order to prevent 
undue burdens being placed upon 
the workers to pay the cost of the 
war attempts will be made to secure 
heavier graduated taxation of large 
incomes, a special tax on land values, 
increased taxes on estates, a system 
of graduated taxation on capital, 
nationalization of railways, mines, 
shipping, banking, insurance and the 
conscription of wealth. The enormity 
of the task the trade union leaders 
have allotted to themselves is cer- 
tainly one which would stagger any 
average group of political econo- 
mists, yet who can foretell what the 
result of this program will be whin 
thought is given to what the men 
of labor in the tight little island have 
already accomplished for the com- 
mon uplift. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STREETS .... SAN PEDRO 



HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS phone w j 

NATIONAL HOTEL 

MRS. ALBERT H. RYAN, Prop. 

FURNISHED ROOMS 

50c Per Day and Up — $2 Per Week and Up 

No. 270 FOURTH STREET SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



TAILORING Fancy Price 



REMOVAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 

S. G. SWANSON Z BEST S 

who has been established since 1904 on Beacon Street, between 6th and 7th 

IS NOW located on the 2nd floor BANK OF SAN PEDRO BLDG, 
entrance 110 WEST 6th STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL., 

Where he is better prepared, because of Much lesser rent, to give the trade the 
advantage of lower prices and as formerly, special care is given to garments en- 
trusted to him for Cleaning, Repairing and Pressing. 

Note — Clothes also cut, trimmed and made from your own cloth with the 
Union Label too. The new woolens are now ready for your inspection, how about 
your order? 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



Mills, Elbert a Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 
FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers In — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro Letter List. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 



San Francitc*. 



Bergman, John Johnsen, Aug. 

Blom, Ernest Konlg, D. 

Christiansen, Anton Nielsen, Harold 

Christiansen, A. Olander, Ed 

Doris, Geo. Thomson, John 
Eckart. T. G. 



A SAILOR'S BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

la particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA- FARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, the bank 

carries on hand at all times an ample supply of Swedish, Norwegian 

and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 
Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



Acne, T. 
Andersen, John 
Anderssnn. Oskar 

uan. Leo 
Button, Roswell 

, C. 
Brien, Hans 
Bro, Emil 

n, Hans B. 
Bushman. John 
Cooley, H. 



Mlchaelscn, Andrew 
Maurice. Francois 
Muller, Henry 
McNeal, John 
Makela, N. 
Malm, Gustaf 
Nilsen, Nils E. 
Nllsen, Oskar 
Nilsen. Oskar J. 
Olsen, J. P. 
Orling, Gust 



Chrlstophersen, C. Owen, Fred 

Carlson, Harry Pedersen, Alt 

Carlson, Gustaf Pelz, Fritz 

William Petrow, A. 

trom, G. Peterson, H. -1064 

Edlund, K'nnrad Pintz, Johan 

Franke, Chas. Peterson, Hugo 

Fjellmaa, Jonas P-tterson. C. V. 

Fugelutsen, Thor Pakki, Emil 

Fjellman, Karl Pederson, Ole 

k Pnrnhard Rickman. Herman 

Glnar, Walter Ryden. Oskar 

Grigolelt, E. Koc. Victor 

Galleburg, Martin Robertson, A. 

Hedman, John M. Rush, Charlie 

ETorlln, Ernest Ries, J. H. 

Henricksen, H. C. Raun, Elnar 

Hedlund, Olaf Rudd, Walter 

Heesche, Henry Skaanea, Egil 

Hnlmstrnm. Fritz Sjoblom, G. A. 

Haupt, Fritz Sprogue, Th. 

Hansen, Charley Stenberg. Alfred 

Hansen, Ole Svenningsen, S. N. 

llov.-rsen. Carl Simpson. L. C. 

^on, Lars Samuelsson, Frank 

Johanson, John Smith. Johan 

Johnson, Jack Soderlund Anton 

.Tanson. Oscar Schmidt. I/)uritz P. 
Johnsson, J. A. -l659Strom. C. L. 

Johanson, Victor Sandblom. Konrad 

Kluff, N. Thorsen, Carl 

Kalla's M. '1'innisen, Andrew 

Kolodzie, George T'llman, Axel 

in. F.dward T'hlig. Rich 

K.illio, Anton riappn. Kosti 
Lundqulst. AbrahamWelson. Julius (Reg. 

o, H. Letter) 

Lindeman, Gust Wtachkar, Ernst 

Lorenz, Bruno Wikman, P. 

Lutzen, Waldemar White. Robert 

T.. ii son, Max Warkkala, John 
l.indherg, Ernst Newspapers and 

ker, Ellth Packages. 

In, John B. Schmidt. I„iurltz P. 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Anderson. John E. 
Rurk. Harry -1284 
Crantly, C. W. 
Eugento, John 
Ekelund, Rlckhard 
Ivertsen. Sigvald B, 
Lengwenus, W. L. 
MSller, F. 



Nelsen. C. F. 
Petersen. Carl 
Peters, Walter 
Relther, Fritz 
Solberg. B. P. 
Strand, Conrad 
Thompson. Emil N. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Edstrom, alias Brynjulf Ed- 
strom, born in Norway in 1879, was 
last heard from at Mobile, Ala., 
where his address was Norwegian 
Chapell, is inquired for. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify his mother. Address, 22 Pile- 
stradet, Kristiania, Norway. — 12-22-15 

George Alexander Sharman, a na- 
tive of Brooklyn, N. Y. About 28 
years of age, height 5 feet 9 inches, 



supposed to have sailed on the Great 
Lakes in 1907, is inquired for by 
M. L. Kinvan, 1211 Mosher street, 
Baltimore, Md. 7-14-15 

George Barrett, who, on November 
12, 1912, left the ship "Port Logan" 
at Newcastle, of which he was an 
apprentice, is inquired for by his 
mother, his father having died. Any- 
one knowing the whereabouts of this 
lost son please at once communi- 
cate with Amelia Barrett, 1 Wood- 
land Place, East Greenwich, Lon- 
don, England. 3-3-15 



Carl Fritjof Johansson Lind, age 
39, a native of Sonderborg, Germany, 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify John Lind, 1401 West 9th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 3-24-15 

Anders C. Anderson, a native of 
Norway, who left his personal effects 
at Port San Luis, Cal., after leaving 
a ship at that place, is inquired for. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify D. R. Jacks, Deputy 
Collector of Customs, Port San Luis, 
Cal. 12-22-15 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July, 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle. Wash. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St. 8-11-15 

Olai Ingebrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Niels Ingebrigtsen, 
469— 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 8-4-15 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Peter Murphy, better known as 
Boatswain McGann, will kindly notify 
Patrick Kieran, 58 Commercial St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 4-19-16 

Vencelus Durbich is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please communicate with 
Gerolamo Durbich, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 7-28-15 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen' Journal 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



It is announced that the steamer "British 
Columbia," owned by H. F. Bullen, of Victoria, 
B. C, has been sold to the Western Shipping 
Company of Vancouver for $95,000. The pur- 
chasers intend to run her in the Vladivostok 
trade. 

H. H. Gastman and associates of Oakland are 
preparing to open a shipyard on Humboldt Bay. 
The company is already organized and a com- 
mittee of the Eureka Development Association 
is looking into the matter of securing a favor- 
able site. 

The steamer "General Hubbard" has been sold 
by the Hammond Lumber Company to Nor- 
wegian parties for $495,000. The vessel was 
built at the Craig yard at Long Beach in 1910. 
Her hull is of steel, and she is 258 feet long 
and 42 feet wide. She has a net tonnage of 
1396 tons. 

The burned steamship "Congress," owned by 
the Pacific Coast Steamship Company, will re- 
main at Coos Bay until the contract is awarded 
for reconstruction of the vessel, according to 
officials of the company. Shipbuilding yards 
along the whole coast will be asked to bid on 
the work. Captain Cousins of the "Congress" 
says she can be made as good as ever. 

The Mexican Government has decided thai 
foreign steamers engaged in the Mexican coast- 
ing trade — prolonged permission for which has 
been given — shall pay one peso per gross ton of 
the goods carried. Exempted from this charge 
are the following articles: Raw oil, maize, beans, 
rice, sugar, piloncillo (unrefined sugar in tubes), 
potatoes, flour, cattle, smoked and salted meat. 

The first industrial accident claim growing out 
of the wreck of the steamer "Bear" off Cape 
Mendocino was filed during the week at San 
Francisco in the application of Mrs. Petra 
Rosas, 15 Le Roy place, near Sacramento street, 
for a death benefit. Mrs. Rosas is the widow of 
Francisco Rosas, who was second cook on the 
"Bear," who was drowned when the lifeboat, 
in which he was, capsized in the surf. 

Sale of the steamer "Breakwater" by the 
Southern Pacific Company to the North Pacific 
Steamship Company has been concluded. The 
"Breakwater," which has been operated by the 
latter concern on an option agreement, will 
continue on the run between Portland, San Diego 
and way ports. She is an iron boat of 1065 tons 
gross, 793 net, 1432 i. h. p., built at Chester, 
Pa., in 1880. The sale price is said to have been 
$90,000. 

Inbound to Grays Harbor and Willapa harbor 
is a fleet of nineteen windjammers, all chartered 
for October, November or December loading at 
mills on the twin harbors. This is the largest 
fleet of sailing vessels en route to these ports 
at any one time since 1912, and the volume of 
off shore business to be handled on the two 
harbors in the coming three months promises 
to be the biggest for any three months' period 
in the last four years. 

The Honolulu harbor commission proposes to 
dredge away a reef and straighten a bend in 
the channel leading into the harbor. If per- 
mission be granted by the U. S. Government 
Lieutenant Colonel R. R. Raymond, U. S. en- 
gineer for the Department of Hawaii, will use 
a portion of an appropriation of $160,000 made 
by Congress to dredge away the Waikiki reef, 
which now makes it necessary for pilots enter- 
ing the port to steer dangerously near to the 
west bank of the channel. 

Following the example of San Francisco lum- 
ber interests, the Puget Sound Stevedoring Com- 
pany has been organized by Sound lumbermen 
and stevedoring companies to maintain so-called 
open shop conditions and in loading lumber 
separately from other stevedoring interests. Se- 
attle is the headquarters, and branches will be at 
all lumber ports on the Sound. Captain J. S. 
Gibson and Captain James Griffiths are the con- 
tracting stevedores included. The manager will 
be Captain A. R. Stewart. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship Companv are hav- 
ing no ; end of trouble with the steamship "Co- 
lumbia." This 5644-ton steamer was damaged by 
striking a mine early in the year while making 
for her home port in the line of her former 
owners, the Royal Dutch West India Mail 
Packet. It is now reported that she has sunk 
alongside the wharf at which she was repairing 
at Amsterdam. She was purchased last year by 
the Pacific Mail Company, along witli the sister 
boats "Venezuela" and "Ecuador," which are 
now under the American flag. 

American capitalists who some weeks ago at- 
tempted to purchase three small steamers be- 
longing to the Inter-island Steam Navigation 
Company, of Honolulu, are reported to have 
paired a number of vessels which for the past 
four years have been laid up at Manila. These 
vessels were built at Shanghai at the beginning 
of the American occupation of the Philippii 
Chinese capital is said to be considerably in- 
terested in the purchase of the tonnage. ' The 
steamers are expected to retain the American 
nag and to be operated between Asiatic ports. 
Ihev were once used as coast guard cutters. 

Collector of the Port J. O. Davis has been 
instructed by the Treasury Department at Wash- 



ington to issue seamen's certificates of American 
citizenship to all seamen applying for same who 
are going to foreign territory. The certificates 
will be issued in lieu of passports. They must 
be signed by Collector Davis and have the 
photograph of the seamen attached. A law was 
passed in 1796 authorizing these certificates and 
they have only been used on rare occasions since 
then. By obtaining the certificates the seamen 
will not meet the long delay encountered in 
applying for passports. 

The constitutional right of the Legislature of 
the territory of Alaska to impose license taxes 
for purposes of revenue has been upheld in a 
decision by the United States Circuit Court of 
Appeals in three appeals by salmon packing 
companies. Under an act of the Legislature of 
Alaska, April 29, 1915, license fees were imposed 
on all fishing companies. The salmon packers 
were already paying fees to the Government 
under an act of Congress of 1906. Judge Hunt 
states in his opinion that the Legislature has 
the power to levy additional taxes to those 
imposed by Congress. It is expected the salmon 
packers will take the case to the United States 
Supreme Court. 

Hereafter the Naval Radio Service will be 
known as the "Naval Communication Service." 
Charges on all traffic exchanged between other 
systems (radio, telegraph and cable) and radio 
stations (ship and shore) operated by the Navy 
will be accounted for by the Naval Communica- 
tion Service. In addition to his other duties, the 
Director of Naval Construction will perform the 
duties formerly assigned to the Superintendent 
of Naval Radio Service. Correspondence re- 
lating to the Naval Communication Service 
should be addressed to the Director of Naval 
Communications, Radio, Va. Remittances should 
be made payable to the Naval Communication 
Service. If used, money orders should be drawn 
on postmaster, Washington, D. C. 

A change has been made in the by-laws of the 
corporation of the Harbor Commissioners of 
Vancouver, establishing a uniform tonnage fee 
for all classes of vessels. The principal require- 
ment of Section 112 of the by-laws, approved 
May 21, 1914. has been rescinded and the fol- 
lowing substituted: "Any vessel entering the 
harbor of Vancouver, B. C, shall on making her 
entry, pay harbor dues to the Corporation of 
the Harbor Commissioners of Vancouver, B. C, 
at their offices at the rate of 3 cents per net 
registered ton, for which a receipt shall be 
given, but no vessel shall pay on more than five 
entries in any one calendar year." There is 
now no distinction based upon the size or class 
of a vessel. Three cents per net ton is the 
uniform charge. 

United States Inspectors of Steamboats James 
Guthrie and Joseph Dolan have the license of 
Captain John Olscn, master of the steam schoon- 
er "Elizabeth," for a period of thirty days for 
inattention to duties. The complaint filed 
against Captain Olscn, by one of the assistant 
inspectors, alleged that he failed to report a 
leaking oil tank and an inefficient lighting sys- 
tem, and did not sec that water was kept in 
the tire buckets, the hose kept connected with the 
hand pump or that the lamp locker was prop- 
erly lined. Captain Olscn failed to mention any 
of these things in his last official report to the 
inspectors. In deciding to suspend Olsen's 
license the inspectors reached the conclusion 
that masters who submitted their official reports 
and failed to make note of inefficient apparatus 
and gear would be severely dealt with. 

A "sea of fire." which the vessel passed 
through safely, and the apparent disappearance 
of Dougherty Island in the South Polar region, 
were among the interesting things reported by 
Captain Ault, in charge of the brigantine "Car- 
negie," operated bv the Carnegie Institute of 
Washington, the only non-magnetic ship afloat, 
which arrived at San Francisco during the week 
for the first time. Since the little vessel was 
launched in 1909 she has logged more than 
200,000 miles and will add 50.000 more miles to 
her log before she reaches New York a year 
hence. Captain Ault said that on the present 
voyage, which was begun March 6, 1915, the 
"Carnegie" passed over the spot where Dough- 
erty Tsland was said to be, but no trace of the 
island could be found. A volcanic action since 
the island was discovered in 1820 may have 
caused its disappearance, was the belief of the 
scientists aboard the brigantine. While the 
"Carnegie" was in the Australian bight, the 
ocean, from some cause which the scientists 
were unable to fathom, the color of the water, 
turned into a sea of fire, through wdiirh the 
vessel sailed unharmed. The "Carnegie" will 
remain at San Francisco a month. She then 
will return to New York via Easter Tsland, the 
Falkland Islands and St. Helena. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Thi.d Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, III. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md WALTER LESCH, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY GUSTAV H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street and 427 West Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

41 Loyails Lane 

NEWPORT, Va MONS MONSEN, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. MOLLERSTEDT, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La DAVID F. PERRY Agent 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WILLY MULLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

OALVESTON, Texas JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 
Broad. 

New York Branch, 514 Greenwich St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 228 Lafayette St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 164 Eleventh Ave. 
Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 181 Fulton St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 231 Dock St. 
NEW YORK CITY, 164 Eleventh Ave. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyails Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW York CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 202 Atlantio Ave. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 328-332 West Randolph St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
I lETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y.. 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR. Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
Branches: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 

BY THE 

SAILOR'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



PAUL SCIIARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE 

One year by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
Maritime Building, 59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the JOURNAL, provided they are of general 
Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only of 
the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1916. 



LINCOLN VS. HUGHES. 



At last we know where Mr. Hughes stands 
with reference to the Seamen's law. 

In a speech at Milwaukee the candidate 
of plutocracy flatfootedly declared "that the 
La Follette Seamen's Act must be repealed." 

Progress must be checked! Freedom for 
seamen and safety at sea must give way to 
the demands of the greedy clique who pose 
as patriots and wax wealthy by exploiting 
cheap and servile coolie crews. 

The same Republican party which only a 
few years ago emancipated the negro slaves 
has apparently executed a complete somer- 
sault. Its titular head, its candidate for Pres- 
ident has shamelessly repudiated the immor- 
tal Abraham Lincoln. Candidate Hughes by 
urging the repeal of the Seamen's law boldly 
and brazenly announces that he stands for the 
restoration of involuntary servitude upon 
American seamen. Although his party has 
seen . fit to maintain a discreet silence upon 
the subject at issue; although practically 
all the progressive Republican Senators and 
Congressmen vigorously supported this legis- 
lation, Mr. Hughes says "it must be repealed." 

Truly, the control of the Grand Old Party 
has fallen into evil and designing hands. 
And the present Republican candidate for 
the main berth in the White House is leaving 
no stone unturned to make it plain to all 
the world that "reaction" is his middle name. 

During recent years the supremacy of 
human rights over property rights lias re- 
ceived increasing recognition. Mr. Hughes 
by his demand for the repeal of the Seamen's 
law has openly challenged that supremacy. 
He has made it absolutely clear that the doc- 
trines and teachings of Abraham Lincoln 
have struck no responsive chord in his heart 
or mind. He appears to have less sympathy 
with the ideals, aims and aspirations of 
American workers than the Czar of Russia 
has shown for the Polish Jews. 



Labor is a necessity to human existence: 
being such, it is obvious that under natural 
conditions it should be a pleasure, not a 
penance. 



ANOTHER "UNION SHOP" VICTORY. 



The so-called "open-shop" campaign re- 
cently inaugurated by the notorious "law and 
order" committee of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce has struck another 
rock. 

For months these trouble-makers had 
worked to bring about a lockout or strike 
in the thoroughly unionized shipbuilding in- 
dustry of San Francisco and adjacent terri- 
tory. All strife was happily, however, averted 
when the unions affiliated with the Pacific 
Maritime Builders' Council voted to 
accept the compromise offer from the Master 
Shipwrights' Association of $4.50 per day on 
all work, which is an increase of 50 cents a 
day over the old scale. Some weeks 
the unions asked for $5 per day on new 
work. This was refused by the employers, 
who offered $4.50 per day, but demanded 
that the unions eliminate the clause in the 
agreement relating to apprentices. This was 
rejected by the unions. When the union men 
met to take a strike vote the employers 
submitted another offer of $4.50 per day and 
consented to keep in the agreement the sec- 
tion regulating the employment of appren- 
tices. This agreement was accepted by the 
unions. The men will continue to work tinder 
union conditions, receive the former rate of 
$5 per day on old work and will at once get 
the increase of 50 cents a day on new work. 
About 700 men are affected by the wage 
increase. 

The leading lights of the "law and order" 
brigade are said to be furious that another 
group of employers has ignored their pleas 
for the establishment of the "open" or non- 
union shop. But everyone else is perfectly 
happy over the results of the negotiations. 
Moreover, the average San Franciscan is be- 
ginning to see the open-shop campaign from 
a proper perspective. He is just arriving at 
the conclusion that there is no other issue 
involved except falsehood and deceit. 

The "open shop" — a goodly apple rotten at the 

heart. 
O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath! 



• T< x ) MUCH" OR "TOO LITTLE." 



Colonel Gorgas, whose work in cleaning 
up the Panama Canal has brought him to 
the favorable notice of the world, has been 
quoted as saying that the rich eat too much 
for their own good and the working people 
eat too little to get along well. He stated 
in this same connection that if wages for 
certain classes of employes were doubled 
their lives would be increased by thirteen 
years. 

Colonel Gorgas is an authority whose 
opinion in this will be accepted more yen 
erally by the working people than by the 
rich, who eat too much for their own 
Statements of the kind attributed to him 
very often get the party making them into 
serious trouble, but as the limitations of 
peech, recently defined by certain uni- 
versities, have not yet been extended to 
Colonel Gorgas, he may escape the com- 
mon fate of those who have said the work- 
man is not well enough paid to allow him 
to live as he should. 

But, if the Colonel had taken the other 
way about and declared the workman was 
a spendthrift, wasted more than he ate, 
i glutton by habit and an overfed in- 
competent generally, while his employer 
was underfed and poorly housed, it is safe 
to guess there would have been more 



prominence given the interview than thus 
far has been its experience. It seems there 
is a sort of tacit understanding on the part 
of the press to keep it quiet. Colonel Gor- 
\ill get all kinds of credit for killing 
mosquitoes, forcing sanitary conditions on 
the /one and compelling everybody down 
there to keep clean, but there will not be 
any medals given him for saying the work- 
men get about half enough wages. 
This is in part what he said: 

Add to the laboring man's wage from $1.25 
to $2.50 a day and you will lengthen the average 
American's thread of life 13 years at least. 

My belief that an increase in the working- 
man's wage would lengthen materially the aver- 
age life is based largely on my experience in 
Panama. 

Tin- question of improving the lower classes 
was forced on me in Cuba and Panama. I am 
convinced that increased wages were responsible 
for much of our success on the isthmus. Of 
course more pay could not affect yellow fever 
and such diseases, but it did make possible bet- 
ter houses, better clothes and better living con- 
ditions. 

We doubled wages automatically when we 

went t<> Panama. It is not within the power of 

the United States government to double the 

- of every laboring man in this country, 

but I feel certain that if it could be done the 

r life would be much lunger. I hesitate 

how much longer, hut I feel sure it would 

be at least 13 years. 

1 believe that our proof of the fact that the 
white man can live in the tropics will result in 
increased wages and therefore increased life be- 
cause it virtually has thrown open an area as 
large as the western hemisphere for settlement. 
It will increase wages in America just as the 
discovery of the western hemisphere increased 
them in the eastern. 

Tf wages of the laboring man are not in- 
ed here he will go to the valley of the 
Amazon, where he can make $5 a day working 
for himself. 

It is because all our lands here have been 
taken up that the laboring man is being 
squeezed and starved. The making of the trop- 
ics habitable will have the same hygienic effects 
as if the Government increased everybody's 
wages from $1.25 to $2.50 a day. 

Colonel Gorgas laid much emphasis on 
the fact that persons who are seeking to 
lengthen the average man's life are regard- 
ing persons of the well-to-do class as the 
average American citizen. "I am \ cry 
much impressed with the fact." he said, 
"that the well-to-do class eat too much. 
Dietetic diseases among the well-to-do are 
having an enormous effect in shortening 

. 

But where overeating shortens the life of 
one person in 100. undcreating shortens 
that of 99. If we arc to lengthen the aver- 
age life, we must pay attention to the poor 
man. 

You might get the amount and quality 
of the millionaire's food on an absolutely 
perfect basis, but the death rate would not 
be affected one iota, because there are too 
few millionaires in the country. So it is 
in considering the American people gen- 
erally. If this Republic is to endure we 
must look to the 99 men in the 100, who 
work with their hands and are insufficiently 
and improperly fed. 



lies of the pamphlet containing the true 
inner history of the Pacific Coast Longshore- 
men's strike are still available at the respect- 
ive union offices. Seamen as well as long- 
shoremen should not fail to read this very 
instructive compilation of unvarnished facts. 
If we expect to profit from the costly mis- 
takes of the past we must familiarize our- 
selves with the causes and events which 
brought about those mistakes. Did you do it? 1 



1 he Republican members of the United 

States Senate— except the courageous La 

U — made sure of their campaign fund 

by voting solid nsl the eight hour day. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



PREDICTIONS VS. RESULTS. 



When the Workmen Compensation bill was 
pending before the California Legislature 
a few years ago the reactionary press pre- 
dicted that its enactment would spell ruin to 
the State's leading industries. Let us briefly 
examine what sort of ruin has actually re- 
sulted from the enforcement of this meri- 
torious law. 

The Industrial Accident Commission has 
just issued some very interesting statistical 
information concerning injuries in the indus- 
tries of the State. 

During the year 1915 there were reported 

to the Commission a total of 67,538 injuries, 

as follows : 

Fatal .'. 533 

Permanent 1,264 

Temporary 65,741 

The total payments for the above injuries, 

reported up to June 30, 1916, amounted to 

$2,002,706.04. This sum was apportioned 

between 

Compensation to injured $1,150,503.56 

Medical payments 852,202.48 

Out of the 67,538 reported injuries 13,254 
lasted 15 days and over. 

It is interesting to compare the 1915 figures 
with those tabulated for 1914. During the 
latter year there were 691 industrial deaths, 
1292 permanent injuries and 60,241 tempo- 
rary injuries, a total of 62,224. Last year's 
death list shows a reduction of 158, due 
largely to the gospel of "safety first" and the 
activities of employers and employes in co- 
operating to remove industrial hazards. The 
permanent injuries also decreased 28. There 
was an increase of 5500 in the temporary 
injuries last year as compared to the 1914 
figures. This is said to be the experience of 
compensation history all over the world. More 
care is taken as time goes on in reporting 
injuries. The natural increase in population 
is a factor in contributing to a larger number 
of temporary injuries. 

Certainly, the California Industrial Acci- 
dent Commission is fully justified in express- 
ing the opinion that the decrease of 158 in 
the death columns and the lowering by 28 
of the number of permanent injuries, will 
commend itself to all the people. 



PURIFIERS OR CONSPIRATORS? 



FREEDOM IN CANADA? 



Secretary Rigg of the Winnipeg (Mani- 
toba) Trades and Labor Council has exposed 
the interesting plan of the Government Min- 
ister of Works, Robert Rogers, to smash the 
Longshoremen's Union. 

Brother Rigg has made public the follow- 
ing telegram forwarded by Rogers to the 
Secretary of the Grain Growers' Commission 
at Fort William : 

Reported to me by Sailors' Relief Association 
that a Mr. Jones of Duluth has started an or- 
ganization of sailors and employes loading ships 
at elevators on all dock ports in Canada to pull 
off a strike about September 15. Get after these 
labor agitators and have them deported. 

(Signed) R. ROGERS. 

Yes, by all means, have the agitators de- 
ported. Or better still, send them to Europe 
to fight for "freedom"! 



"The Seamen's law has driven the Stars 
and Stripes from the seven seas !" So they 
say. Still current official statistics show that 
American shipping in the foreign trade has 
increased from 2405 vessels of 1,076,152 gross 
tons on June 30, 1914, to 3135 vessels of 
2,194,470 gross tons on June 30, 1916. 
Columns of similar, equally convincing data 
are available. But there is no need for a dis- 
play. "Enough is as good as a feast." 



Custodians of Million Dollar Slush Fund Find 

Themselves Confronted by Suit for 

Heavy Damages. 



The following interesting complaint has been 
filed by Emil G. Buehrer, representing the stri- 
king culinary workers of San Francisco, against 
the self-constituted purifiers who masquerade 
under the name of the "law and order com- 
mittee" of the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce: 

In the Superior Court of the State of Cali- 
fornia in and for the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

Emil G. Buehrer, plaintiff, v. F. J. Koster, C. 
R. Johnson, C. P. Michaels, George Rolph, and 
Wallace Alexander, defendants. Complaint for 
injunction and damages. 

Plaintiff complains of defendants and for cause 
of action alleges: 

I. — That on or about the 15th day of July, 1916, 
said defendants, being induced by malice, jeal- 
ousy and avarice, entered into a combination, 
confederation and conspiracy, under the name of 
the Law and Order Committee of the Chamber 
of Commerce of the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, and ever since, 
said defendants have been and still are, co-con- 
spirators in a combination, confederation and 
conspiracy, under the name of the Law and 
Order Committee of the Chamber of Commerce. 
II. — That the object and purpose of said com- 
bination, confederation and conspiracy is to 
coerce and compel persons constituting the la- 
boring class of the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, to enter into a 
written agreement not to join or remain a mem- 
ber of any labor organization, as a condition of 
such person or persons securing employment or 
continuing in the employment of any member 
of said Chamber of Commerce, and to coerce and 
compel the members of the various labor unions 
of the City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California, into deserting and abandoning said 
unions, all in open and direct violation of the 
provisions of Section 679 of the Penal Code of 
the State of California, and to Mexicanize the 
laboring class of the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, and to reduce said 
laboring class to a condition of peonage and 
slavery, and at the same time for the said con- 
spirators to absolutely control labor and the 
labor market in the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, and to become 
dictators thereof, in open and direct violation of 
law and order. 

III. — That the manner in which said combina- 
tion, confederation and conspiracy is to attain 
and obtain said objects is as follows: By 
causing the retail and wholesale merchants and 
employers of labor in the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California, to sell no 
goods and supplies to those persons, merchants, 
houses or firms which employ members of the 
various unions of the City and County of San 
Francisco, contrary to the provisions of the Act 
of the Legislature of the State of California, en- 
titled "Act 4207-A 'LTnfair Competition,' approved 
June 19, 1913," and also in violation of an Act 
of Congress of the L T nited States, entitled "Sher- 
man Anti-Trust Act." 

IV. — Plaintiff further alleges, upon informa- 
tion and belief, that pursuant "to said conspiracy, 
and for the purpose of carrying it out, said de- 
fendants have entered into contracts or arrange- 
ments with various employers of labor in the 
City and County of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia, whereby said employers obligate them- 
selves not to hire or employ any person or per- 
sons belonging to or associated with any labor 
union or organization in said City and County, 
or hiring or employing any person or persons 
who shall have been declared antagonistic to said 
defendants or said Chamber of Commerce: that 
the members of the Cooks' Union. Local No. 44. 
Waiters' Union, Local No. 30, Cooks' Helpers' 
Union, Local No. 110, and Waitresses' Union, 
Local No. 48, have, each and all of them, been 
declared by said defendants to be antagonistic 
to said defendants and said Chamber of Com- 
merce; plaintiff further alleges, upon informa- 
tion and belief, that pursuant to said conspiracy, 
and for the purpose of carrying it out, said de- 
fendants, on or about the 1st day of August, 
1916, caused a large number of restaurant 
keepers in said City and County, to wit, about 
three hundred (300), to discharge their employes 
who were then members of said unions, under 
the unlawful threat that unless they did so, said 
restaurant keepers would be denied the privilege 
of purchasing their supplies from the retail and 
wholesale merchants in said City and County, 
and that on or about said 1st day of August, 
1916, nearly all of the said restaurants keepers in 
said City and County, under and by virtue of 
the coercion, threats and intimidation of said de- 
fendants, did discharge all their employes who 
were then members of the following unions, to 
wit: Cooks' Union. Local No. 44, Waiters' 
Union, Local No. 30, Cooks' Helpers' Union, 
Local No. 110, and Waitresses' Union, Local No. 
48, all of which were voluntary unincorporated 
associations, whose memberships were and are 
numerous, to wit: whose number is two thousand 
Im ■ ii affected by said unlawful and wrongful acts 
(2000) persons or thereabouts, all of whom have 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 25, 1916. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m„ E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping medium. Andrew Furuseth ad- 
dressed the meeting at length on the Atlantic 
and British Columbia situation. Full Shipwreck 
Benefit was awarded to eight members of the 
crew of the steamer "Congress." 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 18, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

REGINALD TOWNSEND, Agent. 
Room 11, De Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 

■St. 

Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 18, 1916. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 18, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 18, 1916. 
Shipping dull. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 18, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects 

H. CHRISTENSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 18, 1916. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 18, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping dull. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 18, 1916. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
l2S]/ 2 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 11, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor; a number of 
members around the hall. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 21, 1916. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secre- 
tary reported shipping fair for waiters, medium 
for cooks. The nomination of delegates to the 
Convention of the International Seamen's Union 
was set for the 1st meeting in October, and to 
be balloted for on the 3rd and 4th meetings in 
October and the 1st and 2nd meetings in Novem- 
ber, 1916. The nomination and election of a 
delegate to the California State Federation of 
Labor will take place at the next regular meet- 
ing at Headquarters and San Pedro Agency. 
The full Shipwreck Benefit was ordered paid to 
one member wrecked on the power schooner 
"Great Bear." The Quarterly Finance Commit- 
tee was elected. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 14, 1916. 
Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 13, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping good for waiters and 
gallcymen, slow for cooks; not many members 
ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box No. 54. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 11, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping fair, but no members 

ashore. ___ 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 

98 Second St. N. Phon e Broadway 2306. 

DIED. 

Richard Fenlon, No. 810, a native of Ireland, 
56, died at Nome, Maskn. Aug. 29, 1916. 

Alexander Nakstrom, No. 668, a native of 
Russia ape 40, died at San Francisco, Cal., 
Sept. 19, 1916. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



CONSCRIPTION IN AMERICA. 



When President Wilson signed on June 
3, the so-called "National Defense Act," 
sometimes called the Hay-Chamberlain Act, 

he signed a law which provides, in time 
of war, for the conscription of American 
citizens between the ages of IS ami 4?. 
'This is the charge made by the American 
Union Against Militarism. The Union 
adds that there is every reason to believe 
that President Wilson didn't realize it at 
the time, and it is certain that very few 
of the Congressmen and Senators who 
voted for the army reorganization law, 
knew that there was such conscription 
clause in it. When the Hay bill was re- 
ported out to the House by the Military 
Affairs Committee, it contained no pro- 
vision whatever for conscription, unless 
the technical provision permitting the 
President to "draft" the National Guard 
into the Federal Service in time of war 
be so considered. But on Wednesday, 
March 22, Chairman 1 lay presented a "com- 
mittee amendment," which had been 
drafted, he said, by Uaydcn of Arizona. 
This amendment provided for the establish- 
ment of "reserve battalions" in time ,,i 
war. 

"The reserve battalion is an English 
idea," continues the statement of the 
Union. "When a regiment is sent to the 
front, to be cut to pieces under fire, a 
reserve battalion is established at the home 
depot to secure recruits, train them and 
feed them to that particular regiment at 
the front as rapidly as they are needed. A 
sensible scheme and in marked contrast 
with the American plan which has been to 
form all the new recruits into new regi- 
ments, regardless of how badly cut to 
pieces the older regiment on the firing line 
may be. When the veteran regiments in 
the Civil War were reduced to thr< 
four hundred men, the practice was to con- 
solidate several regiments, producing vast 
confusion in regimental records and no end 
of jealousy and friction among the officers. 
Hayden's amendment would abolish all 
that. 

"But down in the middle of the section 
was the following clause : 

" 'If for any reason there shall nut be 
enough volunteer enlistments to keep 
the reserve battalions at the prescribed 
strength, a sufficient number of the un- 
organized militia shall be called into the 
service of the United States to maintain 
each of such battalions at the proper 
strength.' " 

"The 'unorganized militia' means all male 
citizens, with certain specified exemptions, 
between the ages of 18 and 45. The whole 
sction was read in the usual singsong by 
the clerk. The amendment was out to 
vote and carried viva voce. When the bill 
went to the conference committee, wdiere 
meetings arc secret and without official 
record, the word 'called' was changed p. 
'drafted.' 

"But when Mesrs. Hay and Chamberlain 
reported to their respective houses the full 
text of the compromise bill, neither thought 
to mention the existence of the draft 
clause. The unwritten law is that the con- 
ference committee is bound fully to inform 
both branches of Congress of all significant 
changes made in a bill in committee. This 
was not done. Onlv by luck or the greatest 



industry on the part of the individual Sen- 
ator and Congressman could the existence 
of this 'joker' have been discovered. The 
thing was buried in the middle of Section 
7 ( >, the title of which: 'reserve battalions 
fur recruit training' indicated a technical 
ami wholly innocent provision. There is, 
as we happen to know, the greatest in- 
dignation in both the House and the Sen- 
i the lack of candor displayed by the 
two men responsible for putting the thing 
through. Section 79 could never have 
passed either House had its real character 
been understood." 



YOUR HEALTH! 



I. W. W.ISM AT WORK. 



The I. W. W. is proving its impotence 
again. After having led the iron range 
strikers in Minnesota away from affiliation 
with the real labor movement and present- 
ing them with the usual run of irresponsi- 
ble leaders, this organization is now loudly 
calling for a general strike of all workers 
to secure the release of some of these 
leaders who have been imprisoned. After 
the strike is lost the alibi will be that the 
rest of the working class did not respond to 
the call for mass action and left the Mesaba 
strikers to suffer. If the strikers had been 
willing to accept the support tendered 
them by the representatives of the Minne- 
sota State Federation of Labor at the time 
they went out they would now be back at 
work with better wages and working con- 
ditions than before and would be de- 
veloping their power of organization to 
work for and get still more. As it is they 
have been led to stand out for results im- 
possible of achievement, and after they 
have been beaten they will have no stamina 
left to carry on the work of organization. 
Surely the examples <>f McKees Rocks, 
Paterson. Lawrence, Grays Harbor and 
dozens of other places should be a lesson 
to the workers that the vaporings of the 
Hay woods and their ilk mean only dis- 
aster for thnse who espouse them. — Seattle 
Union Record. 



IT ALL DEPENDS! 



"What is sauce for the goose is sauce 
for the gander." That adage seems to 
have been forgotten by Charles F. Hughes 
and most of his supporters. They deplore 
the settlement without arbitration of the 
railroad labor controversy. P.ut they are 
not urging arbitration in the Xew York 
street railway strike and arc certainly op- 
posed to arbitration in settlement of differ- 
ences with Mexico. In the same address 
at Nashville wherein Mr. Hughes de- 
nounced the passage of the eight-hour law 
he said that he would have protected 
American property in Mexico. In other 
words, he would not have referred matters 
to an international commission, as Wilson 
did. but would have used force. If arbi- 
tration is the proper method of settling 
a controversy in which it does not ap- 
pear to the advantage of Mr. Hughes' cor- 
poration friends to fight, why is it not 
just as proper when a resort to brute force 
would be to the advantage of monopolistic 
interests? — The Public. 



id "union made" tobacco is in the 
market everywhere. Tt is your duty to refuse 
any other. 



What profiteth a man that he gain the 
whole world yet lose his health? 

Naturalists say that long ago the pre- 
historic waters were infested with a species 
of enormous shark which finally became 
extinct by reason of the workings of its 
voracious appetite. Thus Nature eliminates 
the over-fed. 

The desire for ease of life and plentiful 
diet is universal and is the great stimulus 
of man and animals alike. When man 
becomes greedy and takes more ease and 
food and drink than is his share, Nature- 
discards him. 

In the race for power and place, for 
ease of circumstance and relief from the 
stimulus of hunger, the modern man is apt 
to forget that unless he is careful of his 
body he will soon be made to suffer for 
the infraction of Nature's inexorable phy- 
sical law. With the loss in body tone 
comes an equal loss in mental acuity and 
the brain which for a time was able to 
operate despite the complaints of an over- 
fed, under-exercised, self-poisoned body, 
stops working. 

Statisticians have discovered that the 
mortality rate of persons in the United 
States over 45 years of age is increasing. 
The strenuous life of to-day is not alone 
■ nsible for this. Lack of health-giving 
exercise, superfluity of diet, lack of re- 
storing sleep, over-stimulation, the high 
pressure of the race for power, wealth and 
position, plus physical neglect, these bring 
early decay. The goal is reached, wealth 
is amassed, — honor, position and power are 
just being grasped when the apple of ac- 
complishment turns to the ashes of dissolu- 
tion. The brilliant mind becomes clouded, 
steady hand is no longer accurate, the 
eye which once gazed fearlessly on the 
whole world is dimmed and it is not long 
before the final break occurs. All of this 
was entirely preventable. 

Other things being equal it is the man 
who leads the well-balanced life who lasts 
the longest, whose work to the end is uni- 
formly the best, he who neither overworks 
nor overplays, neither overeats, overdrinks, 
nor oversleeps, he who maintains a stand- 
ard of simple healthy diet in moderation. 
who offsets mental work with physical 
recreation, who is as honest with his own 
body as he is with his own business. 
When success comes to such an one his 
physical and mental condition is such that 
he can enjoy in peace of mind and content- 
ment of body the fruits of his labors. 

The regulations of United States Public 
Health Service state: "It is the duty of 
officers to maintain their physical as well 
as their professional fitness. To this end 
they shall be allowed time for recreation 
and study whenever their official duties 
will permit." If the Government regards it 
as essential that its sanitary experts shall 
be safeguarded in this way, is it not 
equally important to every citizen that he 
similarly maintain a high standard of phy- 
sical integrity? 



The truth may be damned up for a time, 
but sooner or later it is bound to break 
through; and the stronger the dam, the 
greater the fl< 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



A GLOOMY FORECAST. 

(By Prof. Ira B. Cross.) 



America will face the greatest industrial 
and financial crisis in its history at the 
close of the European war. 

Great war industries and munition fac- 
tories will close, with the result that wages 
will be greatly cut, which will in itself 
produce a labor crisis such as we have 
never seen. 

Let me explain. To-day America is 
literally drunken with gold. From August, 
1914, when the great war in Europe com- 
menced, to June 1, 1916, more than $633,- 
000,000 in gold poured into America in pay- 
ment of huge war orders. This has flooded 
the country with money, has decreased 
the buying power of gold and increased the 
cost of living. It has produced a great era 
of prosperity. Wages and prices have been 
raised. 

With the great quantities of gold in the 
country, the purchasing power of our gold 
naturally decreases, because it becomes 
commoner; it is not so rare. This is hard 
for the public to understand, but the value 
of anything depends on demand and supply, 
and this is true of our gold dollar. Al- 
though the actual price of gold per ounce 
remains the same, being fixed by the Uni- 
ted States Mint, yet, because it is so plenti- 
ful, it becomes cheaper when measured in 
terms of other things, and will consequent- 
ly buy less. When the buying power of 
gold goes down, then the prices of other 
things go up in proportion. This rule also 
works the other way. With the increased 
buying power of gold, the prices of com- 
modities decrease. 

When the war ends in Europe there will 
be a great demand for gold to rebuild and 
resuscitate the countries that have been 
devastated by the ravages of war. Thus, 
gold will flow out of America, decreasing 
our present supply. This will have its ef- 
fect. War munition factories will also go 
out of business and the great quantities of 
capital now invested in these plants will 
be diverted to other channels, possibly to 
Europe to assist in repairing the damage 
now done from the product of war factories 
here. Perhaps some of the millions of 
capital now invested in the making of 
munitions will be turned toward the pro- 
duction of other commodities. This, with 
the export of gold to Europe, will naturally 
reduce the amount of gold in the United 
States. Thus, the buying power of gold 
will tend to increase and the price of com- 
modities will decrease. 

With the closing of these great plants, 
which are now working night and day 
filling war orders, hundreds of thousands of 
men, who are now receiving the highest 
wages ever paid in the United States, will 
be thrown out of work. With these thou- 
sands of idle men, business will be at a 
standstill. This will have an effect on the 
present scale of high wages. A slashing 
of wages will precipitate a most serious 
labor crisis, and the great laboring masses 
will not understand the causes. This in- 
dustrial unrest will have its effect on the 
financial interests of the country, producing 
a condition that will bring untold suffering 
and woe, and undoubtedly great social and 
economic changes. 

There is no telling what will be the out- 
come of the crisis. It may possibly mean 
a great readjustment of the relations be- 
tween capital and labor, which will event- 



ually improve industrial conditions in the 
United States. But the close of the war, 
while a blessing to Europe, will probably 
make economic conditions in America the 
worst in its history. 



COAL IN GERMANY. 



The coal situation in Germany may have 
some bearing on the probable duration of 
the war. The reason for this is not to be 
sought in the cessation of shipments from 
England, but solely in the lack of rolling 
stock, which is almost monopolized for 
military purposes. Austria normally buys 
her entire supply of coal and coke in Ger- 
many, and, if need be, is in a position to 
cover her wants by lignite of her own 
production. But Germany has in the last 
few decades bought large quantities of 
anthracite from England, and, besides the 
seaports, it was Berlin that consumed Eng- 
lish coal in steadily increasing quantities. 
It is noteworthy that in the same propor- 
tion in which the consumption of Eng- 
lish coal increased, imports of Austrian 
brown or lignite coal diminished. So that 
the German industry, if a coal famine were 
to ensue, could, just as Austria herself, fall 
back upon the latter's production of lignite. 
It is qualitatively much inferior, but, it 
must be remembered also, much cheaper 
fuel. In 1903 Berlin consumed only 344,000 
tons of English coal, or twelve per cent, of 
the total amount of coal used in the city. 
In 1913 the consumption of English coal in 
Berlin had reached a total of 720,000 tons, 
or nineteen per cent, of the total. Against 
this increase, the consumption of Austrian 
lignite had decreased in those ten years 
from three per cent, of the total coal used 
to one-sixteenth per cent. Available statis- 
tics show that Germany imported during 
the normal years of 1912 and 1913 from 
England 9,100,000 tons of anthracite. To 
her other enemies Germany sold anthracite, 
Belgium receiving in the same period 5,- 
500,000 tons, from which must be deducted 
350,000 tons which Belgium sold to Ger- 
many. To France, Germany sold 3,100,000 
tons, to Italy 800,000 tons, to Russia 1,800,- 
000 tons. Germany shipped in the same 
period 800,000 tons of coke to Belgium 
and bought from the latter 510,000 tons. 
To France, however, she sold 2,300,000 tons 
of coke, to Russia 500,000, and to Italy 
170,000. Germany also shipped 750,000 
tons of anthracite briquets to Belgium and 
France. From Austria she imported lignite 
to the amount of 7,100,000 tons. On the 
basis of these figures the cessation of ex- 
ports to France, Italy, Russia and Belgium 
fully makes up for the cutting off of the 
English supply of anthracite, in addition to 
which sight must not be lost of the oppor- 
tunity to import more Austrian lignite 
coal and use the mines of occupied terri- 
tory in Belgium and France. 



AN IMPARTIAL VIEWPOINT. 



England is being Prussianized, not by 
the Kaiser's military and political tools, 
but by the ruling classes of the British 
Isles. — The Worker, Brisbane, Queensland, 

Australia. 



The world's most useful citizens have been 
merely "dreamers," in the esteem of their 
fellows. The whole progress of humankind 
is but a realization of their visions. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 652. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT. MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG. N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 406 N. Clark Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y TO Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 365. 

BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wi«. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELEF STATIONS: 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. T. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Wis. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Ludington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. j 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



the eight-hour law could be observed and 
all other features of the service adjusted 
to the eight-hour law. The language means 
and means only that there shall be no 
changes in the relations of the parties in 
any effort of the railroads to recoup what 
they assert to be an increase of wages. 

"The present threat of some railroad of- 
ficials to resist the law and refuse to put it 
into effect until forced to do so by the 
courts is strangely inconsistent with the 
known position of the railroad officials, 
often stated by them and made in their 
replies to the President, that they have 
no objection to an increase of wages if 
they are permitted to recoup for that by 
increased charges on the public. They 
would no doubt welcome with avidity an 
increase of wages and expenses and evi- 
dently Eavor it, because they think that 
they could secure an increase of rate 
ly out of proportion to the increased 
expetw. 

"Those gentlemen who see proper to 
resist the law until compelled by the courts 
will probably find the first expression from 
the court in the shape of a criminal war- 
rant for failure to comply with the law. 

"These gentlemen pretend that the eight- 
hour law is unconstitutional. The Con- 
stitution charges Congress with the duty 
and invests it with the power to regulate 
interstate commerce. Part of that regula- 
tion should and does relate to the safety 
of passengers and property. This act, like 
the sixteen- and nine-hour laws, is based 
on the idea of public safety. If it is war- 
ranted by the Constitution, it is not uncon- 
stitutional. If it is a regulation of com- 
merce it is constitutional. No genuine 
lawyer will deny that prescribing hours of 
labor for persons operating trains, pre- 
scribed in the interest of public safety, i^ 
a regulation of commerce. If any alleged 
lawyer gives any such erroneous advice and 
any railroad official, acting on that advice, 
- to jail, he should have 'benefit of 
counsel' far enough to insure the incarcera- 
tion with him of that unfaithful lawyer, 
and both of them would look well in 
stripes, and probably will be thus adorned 
if they persist in their announced course." 



Strike Mediation in Ohio. 

In a report on strike mediation in Ohio 
the Industrial Commission says mediation 
cannot bring about exact industrial justice, 
but probably no method of settling indus- 
trial disputes can more nearly approach 
justice if fairly and fearlessly carried out. 

"In mediating strikes, the representatives 
of both parties have seldom been brought 
together in conference, but instead con- 
fidential conferences have been held first 
with one side and then with the other until 
the fact^ in the case were secured and a 
satisfactory basis of settlement determined 
upon by the mediators. Usually the final 
terms of settlement have come not as a 
proposal from either side, but as a pro- 
posal from the mediators with the definite 
understanding that unless it was accepted 
without change by both sides, the propo- 
sition would be withdrawn by the medi- 
ators and each side would be in exactly 
its former position. Mediation under this 
plan, does not disclose to either side the 



weak points or the strong points in the 
position of the opposite side. 

"Mediation has a marked influence in re- 
moving the bitterness which often occurs 
during, or even continues after, industrial 
disputes. Joint conferences, except in cases 
where the employes have been organized 
for a number of years and are accustomed 
to dealing with their employers through 
committees, are often productive of bitter- 
ness and for that reason are seldom held 
by the mediators as has already been 
stated. 

"As the work has been carried on in 
Ohio, mediation is undertaken in only the 
most difficult disputes. If labor is well 
organized and the two sides are fairly 
evenly matched, mediation is seldom sought 
except where the conferences have resulted 
in a deadlock. In the majority of cases 
where mediation has been undertaken, the 
employes have been either alto-ether un- 
organized or very recently organized." 



Strikebreakers in Revolt. 

While the Public Service Commission of 
New York was holding open hearings on 
the street car strike a crowd of strike- 
breakers, who had escaped from one of the 
closely guarded barns in which the "free 
and independents'' are herded, appeared 
before the commission and told a story of 
being slugged, robbed and being held as 
prisoners. The spokesman said he and 
his companions were compelled to live in 
filth, that the detective agency had refused 
to pay them and that they had not been 
given enough to eat. They said they had 
been brought to New York City by the 
Bergoff Brothers & Waddell Detective 
Agency and had originally been promised 
$5 a day. This was reduced and when 
the strikebreakers objected they were told 
to take what was offered them or they 
would be "beaten up." 

"< me hundred and fifty strikebreakers, 
all of them brought from Chicago, are 
prisoners at the car barn at 179th street 
and Third avenue," said the spokesman. 
"All of them have gone on strike and want 
to quit, but the guards won't let them out." 



An Inquisitive Editor. 

Editor Hilton of the Wheeling (W. Ya.) 
Majority appears to hold the belief that 
workingmen should be given the same 
treatment as other sections of society and 
lie throws this question into the "dear 
public" hopper: 

"To the contention that the railroads 
should not have been compelled to grant 
the eight-hour day, with its consequent in- 
crease of pay, until after an investigation, 
we would answer: 'Why this discrimina- 
tion?' What investigation was permitted 
the railroads by the Steel Trust when it 
put up the price of rails? What investiga- 
tion was permitted the railroads by the 
bankers when they put up the price of 
loaned money? Why should the workers 
be singled out in this thine ?" 



Industry's Frightful Toll. 
The frightful mortality in Pennsylvania 
industries continues. Figures just published 
for the first eight months of the year show 
a total of 166,084 accidents, a daily average 
of 810. Of the total accidents, 1582 were 
fatal. The monthly average for the first 
eight month-; of the vear is 198 fatalities 



and 20,760 accidents of all kinds. 

The many accidents of the year have led 
to 49,552 compensation cases being entered 
in the State Workmen's Compensation 
Bureau, 1578 of these cases arising from 
fatal accidents, and 47,974 from non-fatal 
ones. Compensation agreements have been 
perfected in 592 of the fatal cases, giving 
support to 418 widows, 130 parents, 1055 
children, 14 sisters, five brothers and one 
niece. 

On August 1 more than $450,000 had 
been paid in disability cases. The amount 
to be paid in fatality cases in which definite 
agreements have been made, totals more 
than $1,300,000, to be paid out weekly over 
terms of years. The amount already paid 
in fatality cases on August 1 was more 
than $39,000. 



PURIFIERS OR CONSPIRATORS? 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



of said conspiracy, and this action is brought on 
behalf of said persons by this plaintiff, and on 
behalf of himself; that said defendants have thus 
prevented and restrained said restaurant keep- 
ers, who formerly employed members of said 
unions, from employing or continuing to employ 
such members. 

V. — Plaintiff further alleges upon information 
and belief, that pursuant to said conspiracy, and 
for the purpose of carrying it out, said defend- 
ants have hired and maintained, and now hire 
and maintain an army of persons who carry con- 
cealed weapons, in violation of the law, for the 
purpose of performing the will of said con- 
spiracy, and have employed persons to assault 
pickets or representatives of said unions who 
are peacefully picketing restaurants which have 
locked out employes who are members of said 
unions. 

VI. — Plaintiff further alleges, upon informaton 
and belief, that pursuant to said conspiracy, and 
for the purpose of carrying it out, said defend- 
ants have imported certain notorious criminals 
from other States, for the purpose of intimi- 
dating and terrorizing employers of members of 
labor unions in the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of California, who refuse to 
accede to the demands of said conspiracy. 

VII. — Plaintiff further alleges that he has been 
informed and believes and on said information 
and belief, alleges that in furtherance of said 
conspiracy, said defendants have, by devious 
methods and from sources unknown to plaintiff 
and the members of said unions, amassed a fund 
of one million ($1,000,000) dollars or thereabouts, 
which they threaten to use as a war fund against 
said members of said unions, and to pay the ex- 
penses of instituting, maintaining and prosecut- 
ing numerous vexatious actions entitled "in 
equity." 

VT TT.- — Plaintiff further alleges that the mem- 
bers of said unions have sustained great losses 
and damages which have been inflicted upon 
them by virtue of said combination, confeder- 
ation and conspiracy, and the acts of the con- 
spirators done in pursuance thereof; that said 
members have been prevented and deterred from 
obtaining employment and continuing in the em- 
ployment of their former employers, as they 
otherwise could, and would have done; that the 
conspirators intended and now intend that said 
unions should be destroyed and put to great ex- 
pense as a result of their conspiracy; that plain- 
tiff and tin- persons whom he represents, by rea- 
son of said conspiracy and the acts done pursu- 
ant thereto, have suffered damages in the sum 
of one hundred thousand ($100,0001 dollars, for 
which he sues to recover three-fold in this action 
under and by virtue of the Act of the Legisla- 
ture of the State of California, entitled "Act 
\ 'Unfair Competition.' approved June 19th, 
1913," and that the defendants threaten to con- 
tinue said unlawful acts, and that plaintiff and 
the persona whom he represents will be irrepar- 
ably injured thereby. 

Wherefore, plaintiff prays judgment: 

1. That said defendants be enjoined and re- 
strained from doing any of the acts complained 
of herein, and plaintiff be awarded damages on 
behalf of himself and the persons whom he rep- 
resents, to wit, the members of the said volun- 
tary unincorporated association, in the sum of 
three hundred thousand C$300,000) dollars, the 
same being three-fold the damages he sustained 
by the action of said defendants as aforesaid, 
together with costs herein, and for such further 
relief as mav be proper in the premises. 

DEVOTO. RICHARDSON & DEVOTO, 
HF.NRY P.. LISTER, 

Attorneys for Plaintiff. 



Good "union made" tobacco is in the 
market everywhere. Tt is your duty to refuse 
any other. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



LIFE ON THE NORTH SEA. 



Editor, Coast Seamen's Journal: 

We are at present in Honolulu and are 
bound for Vladivostok. From Vladivostok 
we will probably sail home with coffee so that 
my absence from Denmark extends over ten 
months. I feel well here on board among 
Danish companions ; considering everything, 
it is not so bad, after all. 

No doubt you will be interested in actual 
conditions prevailing in Danish waters. Dur- 
ing the present war they pay a considerable 
bonus : Forty kroner extra for a return trip 
over the North Sea, which requires seven 
days under normal weather conditions. Most 
of the companies at home do not pay this 
bonus as long as the ships are not within the 
war zones. The latter having no fixed limits, 
the men soon begin to kick and receive then 
a monthly bonus of 60 per cent, no matter 
where the ship may be, and those who re- 
main for another trip receive 100 per cent, 
extra. We carry also an accident insurance 
of 12,000 kroner payable after death by ship- 
wreck. In fact, all those who remain poor 
in Denmark and make no money do not de- 
serve any pity whatever. 

German and English merchantmen lie 
close together between men-of-war. Gnus 
bristle from all sides ; at times we actually 
are in doubt whether these are merchant or 
war vessels. Suddenly there appears some 
unassuming little trawler, but equipped with 
a gun mounted on high supports so as to 
rise over the funnel. 

The Danes, too, have taken all kinds of 
precautionary measures : Armed motor-driven 
fishing boats of 30 feet length with a 57 mm. 
gun mounted on the forecastle are by no 
means a rare sight in Danish waters. Motor 
boats are supposed to make such unearthly 
noise that the enemy must become convinced 
that he has to deal with a superior opponent 
equipped with quick-firing guns of large 
caliber and turns abruptly to flight? Of 
course, we can not act otherwise. Tf all 
the world relies upon "bluff," why should 
the Danish not do likewise? 

The North Sea, which was formerly so 
peaceful, has now been transformed into one 
big graveyard. Indeed, if all those sailors 
who have perished here during the last 
eighteen months could have turned into alba- 
trosses to make a wide detour, many of them 
would be still alive. All those who travel 
over the North Sea meet a wreck here and a 
mine there. Sailors reach land with keel 
upward, minus an arm and a leg, with a 
wind "bound for nowhere." This is such a 
common sight that nobody pays any attention 
to it. However, if a ship arrives over one 
or the other route without accident, both the 
public and the press are highly interested in 
such wonder. This is something out of the 
ordinary and makes people think. If every- 
thing has been made ship-shape on board and 
there resounds suddenly at night a dismal 
voice within hailing distance and asks "where 
do you go and who are you," this may either 
he merely a neutral who wants to have a 
little fun. or it may be the craft of some 
of the warring nations which cannot be dis- 
cerned one from another. 

Some have a flag on the side of their 
ship but no heed is given to nationalities, and 
not much confidence placed in the neutral 
flag, although some ships were seen with 
the latter. 

Down in Java and during our trip to Aus- 
tralia we met big German steamers in many 



places. Some had full complements, the crews 
of others which had to be disinfected, were 
reduced by fever. There are no chances of 
returning home. Here one gets a realistic 
impression of what the war with Germany 
means to those Germans who are far away 
from their country. They do not fight for 
their Fatherland, but they have to struggle 
with the elements of nature which are more 
powerful than even the British. These and 
other privations have left their mark on them. 
They look like human wrecks, hollow 
cheeked, pale and thin. They do not receive 
the food needed by men. Some shipmasters 
have combined and have rented a piece of 
land up in the mountains where the air is 
better. There they will work for wages to 
hold the crumbling life together. 

I might say much more in this connection, 
however, my time does not allow it. Will 
write you more from Vladivostok. The next 
trip will probably be to the Pacific Coast, 
then I may tell you more. With best regards 
to our mutual friends on the Pacific Coast. 

(Signed) Scatty. 
S. S. "Transvaal," Honolulu, Aug. 1, 1916. 



WHY PAPER IS HIGH. 



When the International Paper Company 
was organized, hardened promoters blushed 
at the flood of water that was poured into 
its stock. It grabbed up paper mills and 
turned them into capital stock almost as 
fast as its mills could furnish paper for 
the stock certificates. 

Even its preferred stock was unable to 
pay dividends and its common stock was a 
joke. One year ago it owed the banks 
$3,400,000 and had $1,800,000 of floating 
indebtedness. 

According to a report just issued all of 
this indebtedness has been paid off and the 
working capital increased from $5,334,000 
to $13,000,000. 

Other paper companies are showing simi- 
lar phenomenal incomes. If you want to 
know why the price of anything is high, 
look for the profit. — The Milwaukee 
Leader. 



INFLUENCE OF MUNITION MAKERS. 



If present international conditions argue 
for an increased military establishment in 
the United States, they argue also, many 
persons will think, for the same thing in 
South America. If the largest republic in 
the western hemisphere is in risk of being 
challenged, the small republics seemingly 
must be, too ; especially since these are not 
asking the United States to defend them. 
When at the north preparedness schemes are 
hastening, and at the south affairs are going 
on in the usual way. some observers may 
explain that Argentina, Brazil and Chile 
have no munitions-making communities to 
keep busy. 



THAT "OPEN-SHOP" LUNCHEON. 



"A burned child dreads the fire," says 
the proverb ; and since his San Francisco 
experience Mr. Hughes has decided that 
he will attend no more campaign luncheons 
because it is "too great a strain." 



Much of that which passes as "progres- 
sive" and "advanced" in the thought of to- 
day is merely outgrown no'.ion expressed in 
a strange vocabulary. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free- text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where thy have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C, 1424 Government St. 

VANCOUVER. B. C, 213 Hastings St., E. corner of 
Hastings and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2216 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
75. 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 242 Flanders St. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Room No. 203, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 214. 
PORTLAND, Ore., 98 Second St. N. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 
PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada, 437 Gore Ave. 
PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada, P. O. Box i 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 10 East St. 
SACRAMENTO, Cnl., 200 M St. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



At the recent New Jersey State 
Federation of Labor convention dele- 
gates pledged themselves to work 
for the passage of a law limiting the 
use of injunctions in strike cases. 
The convention denounced the Con- 
necticut law, which permits the 
seizure of workers' horn. 
judgment is secured. President Quin 
and Secretary Hilfers were re-elected 
and Paterson was chosen as the next 
convention city. 

President Williams, of the Brook- 
lyn Rapid Transit Company, an- 
nounces that the board of directors 
has authorized a wage advance for 
nearly 10,000 employes as a reward 
for not joining the Street Car Men's 
Union. The increases range from 
2 to 3 cents an hour and will total 
$650,000 a year. Because the Brook- 
lyn men took no part in the move- 
ment to better conditions, and made 
no sacrifice, they are now rewarded 
for their "loyalty." 

Shop men employed by the Coal 
and Coke Railway of Indianapolis 
have secured a federated agreement 
which increases wages for every em- 
ploye 2 cents an hour and upward. 
The agreement was witnessed by a 
representative of the Federal Depart- 
ment of Labor. This official was 
called in by the company and Vice- 
President Nolte of the Brotherhood 
of Railway Carmen of America says: 
"This would indicate that the de- 
partment is being recognized by the 
employers, also, as a great factor in 
the adjustment of disputes." 

Before final adjournment of the 
Georgia State Legislature, labor se- 
cured- these three remedial statutes: 
Compulsory education, factory in- 
spector and a text-book law-. After 
a hard fight the workers were de- 
feated in their effort to secure a 
law providing for semi-monthly pay. 
The State Federation of Labor, the 
Farmers' Union and the railroad 
brotherhoods acted jointly in tin se 
matters and the experience and 
solidarity that has been developed 
as a result of this three-cornered 
movement, will be of inestimable 
value in the future. 

President Gompers has forwarded 
a letter to all national unions, and 
western state and central bodies for 
lists of unions having Mexican 
workers and for other information 
that will he helpful to the A. F. of 
L. in its efforts to inform these work- 
ers of the Mexican situation and to 
show them the necessity for identi- 
fying themselves with the organized 
labor movement and co-operating 
for the welfare of the workers of 
both countries. Special literature has 
been prepared for this educational 
campaign, which is intended to solid- 
ify the workers of both the United 
States and Mexico. 

The New York Waterproof Gar- 
ment Workers' Union has signed a 
union shop agreement with the Wa- 
terprooof Garment Manufacturers' 
Association. A 48-hour week and 
the following wage rates are se- 
cured: 75 cents an hour minimum 
for operators and cementers; $18 a 
week for button sewers and $29 a 
week for cutters. About 1000 work- 
ers are benefited. This victory was 
followed by the independent manu- 
facturers, employing about 3000 
workers, agreeing to the same con- 
ditions. The raincoat workers are 
affiliated to the International Ladies' 
Garment Workers' Union. 



MARSHALL'S 



Residence 
North 3445 



NAVIGATION SCHOOL 



DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

Compasses Adjusted 

301-2 P. I. BUILDING, Next to Post Office 

Established 1890 SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 
1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St 
Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postoffice, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 

not be held longer than 30 days from 

date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 

Ackerson, A. R. Laamanen, J. 

Andersen, A. -1821 Laine, A. V. 

Andersen, P. T. Larsen, Neis 

Andersen, Oscar T^arsen, C. A. 

Andersen -918 Larsen, Ed 

Alfredsen, Adolf Larsen, Axel 

Anderson, Ole A. Livingstone. E. 

Andersen, A. C. Mathisen. Sigurd 

.1108 Magnueen, Lars 

Anderson, G. (Cas- Macfarlane, Jas. 

S ie) Marhads. Henry 

Anderson, John Mcintosh, .Tames 

Anderson, Alf. -163S Mietenen, John 

Anderson, Albert Morrisay, James 

Astad, Ole Mynlcm.'yer, H. 

Bckker, Geo. K. Mlkkelsen, K. 

Branz, J. A. Miller. James 

Behm F Mortensen, J. R. 

Benson, b. Moore. Albert 

Benson, C. V -1894 Newland. Ernst 

Bergstrom, A. Nygren, Gus 

Bach M Nielsen, Estwan 

Billsteln, K. Nllsen, Feder 

Brennan, P. Nltske. O. 

Bessen. George Nygard. Oluf 

Berg. Johannes Ness, J. 

Carlson, John Neteen, Adolf 

Connor. W. F. Nelsen. A. W. 

Carruthers, M. Olsen, A. M. -944 

Chrlstensen. -1366 Olsen. James 

on. Gust Olsen, Tellef 

Cottlngham, F. Olsen, Harold 

Pavidsen. John Olsen, Ole 

an, Geo. Olsen. C. A. -1303 

Kscers, J. O. W. Olsson, I. H. 

Eriksen, Otto Olsen. B. -597 

Brrlman. Paul Olsen, Chr. M. 

F.rikson, J. R. Olsen. Oswald 

TCrhe L J Ozerhowski. Leo 

Rspedal.' J.' PIctzman, L. n. 

j Puhllrates. Aug. 

Fernev. S. Peterson. W. 

Fernqulst, C. W. Peterson. Calle 

Ford L Powers, .lames A. 

Fran'zell.' A. Pahst, Max 

Fredericksen, B. J. Petersen. Lawrence 

Gardner, James Permin, J. 

Gabrielsen, P. Poobus. S. 

Gerber, Fritz Rostoln. A. M. 

Gllroy Wm Rasmussen. John 

TTa risen. Ole Reaues. N. R. 

Haavold. P. Beinink. TT. 

Hnugrud. H. O. Rohberstad. Nils 

TTnlmstrom, Harry Rundstrom. A. 

Halin J Balvesen, Soerdmp 

TTernes. K. Schmidt. F. TT. 

TTendersen, Rob. Peeley. T. 

BTohn, TT P. -2081 Stein. Herman 

Hnhne A. Stammerjohan. C. 

TTntten. C. Strasdln, A. W. 

TTunter. Ernest Samsing, C. J. 

rsen. John L. Samuclsen. W. T„ 

Haug G H. Schaurman W. 

Tversen. Ole Sampson. O. 

Jacobson, J. Reffnla. F. 

,son. O. Skedsmne. A. 

Jensen. Hans Stohr. E. C. 

Johansen. Osrnr Sorger. F. 

.Tnrcensen. Olaf Strand. Ch. 

.Tiincre. H. Stewart. V 

Johanson. Aug. Strand. Al 

Jonsson. Karl Tiormen. K. M. 

Johnsen, Peder Tullgowski. rail 
Johnson. A. W. -5186Taft. Hans 

Jansson. B. F. H. Thorsen. Andrew 

.Torgensen. Oluf Vnlentlnsen, G. 

Kmitsen. Pete Walters, Ausr. 

Ftorkl, J. Wernersen, L. 

Koch W. Wleksten, A. 

Kinrsvlk. Johan Wetland. John 

Krlstiansen, Nils "Westerhind, Albert 

Fnlherg. Arvid Walsh. Ed. 

Knlodzu, G. Wnhlstrom. E 

Knitrer, Johan Williams. T. C. 

Lewis, James wirkstrom. Anton 

Lundereen, Carl Toung, A. 



Phone Main 1202 

L. V. WESTERMAN 

CLOTHIER 

FURNISHER and HATTER 
ALASKA OUTFITTER 

220-222 First Avenue South, at Main 
SEATTLE 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 



Broadway at Olive St. 



East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 

Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



EureKa, Cal. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy ® Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUp'oF COFFEE 

— OP — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 
Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Adolfsson, Gottfrld Melngail, M. 

Bratt, F. H. Nielsen, Niels -751 

Carlson, Gustaf Olsson, Per 

Hodson, H. I. Peel, Peter 

Jacobson, Gustaf Simonson. Sigvard 
Jensen, Hans -1555 Soter. Erik 

T.undgren, Carl Suominen, Oskar 

Magnusson, Ernest Svensen, John 

W. Ullman, Emil 

Marks, Thorwald VIgen, Ellas 
Martinsson, E. 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 
■ Trunks and Suitcases • 



Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 8393 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Alfred Pettersen Hilland, a native 
of Bergen, Norway, age 44, is in- 
quired for by his brother, Randolph 
Pettersen. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, 100 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 7-26-16 

Gumersindo Fernandez, formerly 
messboy on steamer "Watson," 
should call at the offices of Nathan 
H. Frank, 1215 Merchants Exchange 
Bldg., San Francisco, and receive 
salvage money due him from S. S. 
"Camino." 8-30-16 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 

Contreraa, Julio Kustel, Victor J. 

Kyrkslatt. Lars Kinowsky, A. 

Lawrence. Harry Ingebrethsen, Alf. 
Melander, G. L. 



Alaska Fishermen 



Arentse, John 
Ast, P. 

Brormare, Adolf 
Carey, Arthur L. 
Frost, H. C. 
Hakanson, John 
Jansen, Jacob 
Jansson, Axel. J. 
Johnsen, Harry 
Johnsen, August 



Koester, Ernst 
Kester, Erich 
Knudsen. O. 
Larsen, Martin 
Nelson. Chas. R. 
Noland, Edvard 
Odland, Sven 
Petersen, Andrew 
Werner, Chas. J. 
Wilhelmson, Seth 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Ingvald Andreas Hansen, alias 
Andrew Hansen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 36; tall, dark; last 
heard of July, 1905. His address 
then was, Andrew Hansen, Karluk, 
Kodiak Island, Alaska. He is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Staff Captain Robert Smith, 
district officer, native work, Alaska, 
Box 925, Wrangell. 4-13-15 

Olof Pedersen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 60, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify J. T. 
Miles, 761 Greenwich St., New York, 
N. Y. 2-16-16 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Thomas Rowe (now aged about 
74), who was at one time a seaman 
and longshoreman on the Pacific 
Coast and also served in the Pacific 
Coast Navy Yards, will greatly oblige 
inquiring relatives by supplying such 
information. Address, Editor, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 1-5-6 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET AT THIRD AND KEARNY 

FALL STYLES NOW READY 
FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

Prices $30 to $50 

Uni0n Own a< Shc!S ° Ur ° PEN SATURDAY EVENINGS UNTIL 10 O'CLOCK 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 



Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 



WORKERS UNION 



UNION^TAK 

Factory 



Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Andreasen, N. S. 
Anderson, N. P. 
Anderson, Nil» 
Anderson, Rasmus 
Adolfsen, John 
Andreson, Hans 
Anderson, Gotfrid 
Benson, S. 
Bernhardsen, Chas. 
Bernadt, H. W. 
Brien, Hans 
Bosse, Geo. 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Dybdal, Olaf 
Edstrom, John 
Erickson, Eric 
Fisher, Fritz 
Hoten, J. 

Henriks, Waldemar 
Hagen, Arthur 
Heln, M. 
Hylander, Gust 
Jespersen, Martin 
Jonsson, Karl 
Jensen, Henry 
Johansen, Nikolai 
Jarwinen, John 



Johansson, Chas. 

-2407 
Karlsen, Ingvald 
Kjer, Magnus 
Kristensen, Wm. 
LIndberg, A. C. 
Lange, Peter H. 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Ljungstrom, John 
Larsson, C. -1632 
Molen, Derk von 
Nygren, Gust 
Ohlsson, J. W. 
Oglive, Wm. A. 
Paulson, Herman 
Palm, P. A. 
Roos, Oscar 
Rensmand, Robert 
Rosenberg, Adolf 
Ryberg, S. 
Smith, John 
Swanson, John L. A 
Schroder, Paul 
Sward, A. 
Tuhkanen, J. J. 
Westengren, C. W. 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



HU0TARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Patrick McFee, who was cook on 
board the schooner "Robert Henry" 
on a voyage to Mexico last year, is 
inquired for by the U. S. Shipping 
Commissioner, at San Francisco, Cal. 

9-15-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



gff y^y g 



Union 

MADE 

Beer 




s 

'Ale 

ani> 

Porter 



f » 

^55^ Of America rG&r 

COPYRIGHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 
THIS IS OUR LABEL 



DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

Albers, George Krause, Otto 
Anderson, William Kuldsen, John 
Anderson, John Koster, Walter 
Anderson, Chris. Kottler, William 
Anderson, A. P. Kard, Hjalmar 
Andersen, Andrew Lindholm, John 
Andersen, Olaf -1118Lindgren, Ernst 
Bjerk, Gustav Lindroos, A. W. 
Bjerk, Geo. Lundkvist, Alarick 
Burmeister, T. Ludvigsen, Arne 
Bjorklund, G. Leedham, Max 
Benson, W. J. Lucey, James 
Bowman, C. McLeave, John 
Brogard, N. Munsen, Fred 
Bohn, Gus Nilsen, Harry- 
Carlson, Adolf M. Nielsen, C. 
Carlson, Gustaf Nordman, Karl 
Carlson, Walter Olsen, W. 
Christiansen, Paaso, Andrew 

Dedrlck Pettersen, Karl 

Crentz, F. Peterson, Nels 

Davis, Frank A. Peters, Walter 

Deam, James Peitsan, Jacob 

Donalson, Harry Pedersen, Alf 

Eriksen, Ole Risenius, Sven 

Grau, Aksil -1116 Rudt, Walter 

Gronros, Oswald Robertson, A. 

Gronlund, Oskar Scheftner, Bernhard 

-414 Sandgvist, Junnar 

Gueno, Pierre- Stemvall, Sigurd 

Harley, Alex Sward, Arnold 

Holmroos, W. Scarabosio, M. 

High, Edward Skotel, A. 

Hansen, Ove Max Toves, H. C. 

Hansen, Jack Torin, Gustaf A. 

Hansen, Thorleif Windt, Walter 

Hylander, Gustaf Williams, T. C. 

Jensen, L. Waaler, Edgar 

Jensen. L. M. P. Wehrman, John 

John, F. Johanson Wagner. Ed. 

Johnsen, Walter Wedequist, Axel 
Johansen, A. Harry Packages. 

Johnson, Fred -1723 Benson, Charles 

Johansson, Arvo Houstor, Harry 
Johnson, Alexander 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Hans Nilson, a native of Tons- 
berg, Norway, was last heard from 
at Mobile, Ala., is inquired for by 
his mother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts kindly notify Louis 
Donald, Norwegian Vice Consul, 77 
St. Francis St., Mobile, Ala. 12-22-15 

Oscar Olsen, age 37, a native of 
Hallerna, near Gothenborg, Sweden, 
who was sailing on the Great Lakes 
about three years ago, is inquired 
for by John V. Olsen, Sun Com- 
pany, Marcus Hook, Pa. 5-26-15 

Hugo Carlson Ljung, age 29, a 
native of Gothenborg, Sweden, was 
last heard from in a Cable Boat on 
the Atlantic Coast, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify John Carl- 
son Ljung, Jungmansgatan 5, Goth- 
enborg, Sweden. 1-12-16 

Knut Jensen, No. 5018, a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, a 
native of Denmark, is inquired for 
by his wife, Lieschen Jensen, of 
Tangemunde, A/Elbe Ostenerweg, 
No. 7, Germany. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify the Lake 
Seamen's Union, 133 Clinton street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 4-14-15 



Port Townsend, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



Home News. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Paul Laux, American, age 23, 6 
feet tall, who was last heard from 
about 4 years ago at San Jose, Cal., 
supposed to be a sailor, is inquired 
for. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify his father, Carl 
Laux, 112 E. 28th St., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 6-21-16 

Adolph Krakan, last heard of at 
Port Pirie, January, 1912, and again 
in March, 1913, from Warumbo, 118 
miles from Adelaide, South Australia, 
is inquired for by his mother at 
Hamburg, Germany. 8-25-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and 
blue eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Any information regarding Wilhelm 
Kuhme, age 27, a native of Germany, 
who was supposed to have been 
drowned in the wreck of the steam 
schooner "Francis H. Leggett," Sep- 
tember 18, 1914, will be thankfully re- 
ceived by the German Consul, San 
Francisco, Cal. 1-19-16 

Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from 
since 1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother, J. Marjama, 51 
South St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 

Bernard Baasen, a native of She- 
boygan, Wis., a former member of 
the L. S. U., who was last heard 
from at Milwaukee, Wis., April 29, is 
inquired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. Sophie Baarsen, 561 Clinton 
street, Milwaukee, Wis. 7-5-16 



It is reported that the German 
cruisers "Kronprinz Wilhelm" and 
"Prinz Eitel Friedrich," now interned 
at the Norfolk Navy Yard, will be 
sent to the Philadelphia Navy Yard 
shortly. It is understood that they 
are in the way of improvements at 
the navy yard. Warships will con- 
voy them to Philadelphia. 

While the public has often been 
told of the incompetency of workers 
—not the "salaried" kind— Elihu Root, 
president of the American Bar Asso- 
ciation, in addressing the recent an- 
nual conference, acknowledged that 
this union, too, had incompetents. 
He said that in many jurisdictions 
the lawyer's ignorance caused courts 
double time and labor. 

To support wage demands at the 
Boston Navy Yard and Watertown 
arsenal, data on wages paid for sim- 
ilar work in outside shops is being 
gathered by Blacksmiths' Union No. 
103 of Boston. The unionists state 
that comparisons made on figures ob- 
tained thus far show that the men 
employed at the local yards of the 
Government are underpaid. 

A profit of more than $1,000,000 a 
week was made by the Ford Motor 
Company during the year ending 
July 31, according to a statement just 
made public. The year's business 
totaled $206,867,347, and profits dur- 
ing the same period were $59,994,118. 
The total number of men employed 
in all plants is 49,870. Of these 36,626 
receive $5 or more a day, the state- 
ment says. 

The shingle industry of Washing- 
ton will be probed as the result of 
statements made by President Marsh 
of the Washington State Eederation 
of Labor at the annual convention in 
Everett. The movement will be 
aided by the Shingle Weavers' Union, 
whose officers say that these workers, 
as a class, are afflicted with throat 
and lung troubles, because of poison- 
ous dust. 

The Circuit Judges' Union, offi- 
cially known as the Michigan Asso- 
ciation of Circuit Judges, has de- 
manded a living wage. The present 
rate is $3500 a year. At a recent 
meeting of the union, held in Lan- 
sing, it was resolved to ask the 
Legislature to raise these figures 
to $5000. In discussing methods to 
secure this increase one member re- 
ferred to the advantages of lobby- 
ing and the august body became 
panic stricken. 

George McKenny, a Chicago thug 
and strikebreaker, employed by ce- 
ment companies at Oglesby, 111., 
was instantly killed by a police offi- 
cer last week. McKenny was evi- 
dently carrying out the policy of 
employers to make all the trouble 
possible and left the mill and came 
upon the streets with drawn revol- 
ver. A police official attempted to 
arrest him. The thug fired once, the 
bullet grazing the policeman. The 
latter then opened fire and instantly 
killed the desperado. 

The first eight-hour clock in exist- 
ence, made by the Sorcnscn Co. of 
San Francisco and now on exhibit in 
their show window, is drawing big 
attention. This clock, instead of 
twice twelve hours, makes three times 
eight hours to conclude the twenty- 
four hours of a day. Beginning at 
midnight it indicates eight morning 
hours, eight noon hours and eight 
evening hours. This change on time- 
pieces is apt to be the result of the 
new eight-hour law for railroad em- 
ployes. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




It is reported that the Norwegian 
shipping firm of Wilhelm Wilhelm- 
sen, Tonsberg, arranging a regular 
service with sailings every three 
weeks between New York and 
I'uenos Aires. 

The Favre shipbuilding plant at 
Gulfport, Miss., will shortly add 150 
men for building a three-masted 
schooner and two ocean-going 
barges. There is building at the 
Handsboro yard a three-masted 
schooner for J. F. Stuard. 

The Lake steamer "Saronic," which 
was destroyed by fire in Georgian 
Bay, has been singularly unfortunate, 
since it was only last December that 
she was seriously damaged by fire 
at Sarnia. She was a woooden ves- 
sel of 1960 tons, built in 1882, and 
owned by the Canada S. S. Lines. 

During the month of August, 1916, 
123 vessels of 50,739 tons gross, were 
built in the United States, of which 
nine of 35,097 tons were steel steam- 
ers, as follows: Atlantic & Gulf, four 
of 17,849 tons; Pacific, one of 8651 
tons; Great Lakes, three of 8386 
tons; Western Rivers, one of 211 
tons. 

A commission of five naval officers 
is to be appointed by the Secretary 
of the Navy to investigate and re- 
port upon the advisability of estab- 
lishing a new navy yard or of en- 
larging and improving an existing 
yard somewhere south of Cape Hat- 
teras or in the Carribean Sea. There 
are to be three line officers and two 
staff officers on the commission. Pro- 
vision is made for this commission 
in the latest naval appropriation act. 

The tug "W. S. Taylor" left 
Hampton Roads for Bermuda re- 
cently with water, provisions and 
coal "to give John Bull a slap in the 
eye" by revictualling and recoaling 
the blacklisted Norwegian steamer 
"Bjornsterjcrne Bjornson," lying at 
Bermuda helpless for lack of coal 
since August 19. She put in there 
on the way from Cette, France. The 
tug also took two lawyers along to 
argue for the ship in case of need. 
The steamer is consigned in New 
York to the Gans Steamship Line, a 
blacklisted firm. 

The Ward Line steamer "Merida," 
sunk 52 miles northeast of Cape 
Charles light in the summer of 1911, 
is still undiscovered at the bottom of 
the Atlantic. Three treasure ships 
equipped by the Inter-Ocean Sub- 
marine Engineering Co., financing a 
hunt in which it hopes to win mil- 
lions, put in at this port last week for 
minor repairs. In the three weeks 
or more they have spent dragging 
for the prize, they found no trace 
of the lost ship. In no manner 
discouraged though, they will con- 
tinue operations until the "Merida" 
has been discovered, or the sinew 
of war is exhausted. 

With a total dumping of 1,654,691 
tons of coal over the Hampton Roads 
coal piers, the coal traffic of August 
was one of the heaviest in the his- 
tory of the port of Norfolk and 
Newport News. The Norfolk & 
Western Railroad led all the others, 
with a total dumping of 821,412 tons 
over the Lambert's Point piers and 
lacked only 11,867 tons of dumping 
as much as the Chesapeake & Ohio 
and the Virginian Railway combined. 
The Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad 
dumped a total of 446,918 tons over 
the Newport News piers. The Vir- 
ginian Railway dumped 386,361 tons 
over the Sewall's Point pier. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

THE GERMAN BANK 
Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. Corner Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30th, 1916 

Assets $63,811,228.81 

Deposits -------- 60,727,194.92 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - J,0>S4,033.89 

Employees' Pension Fund ----- 222,725.43 

Number of Depositors ----- 68,062 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Abrahamsen, A. Andersson, Erick 

uusen, Berner -1781 
Aluahamsson, W. Andersson, G. -1229 
Ahl, Einar T. Andersson, Gottfried 

Ahokas, Ilmarl Andersson, E. H. 

Albertsky, Fritz Andersson, J. A. 
Alksen, Charlie Andresen, A. -1635 

Amundsen, Amund Antonsen, Carl 
Andersen, C. -1716 Antonsen, Marius 
Anderson, C. F. Apple, August 
Anderson, Ernst Anis, Tobias 

Anderson, F. -332 Arntsen, Julian 
Anderson, F. -1473 Arndt, Paul 
Anderson, J. C. -1552Asklund, Gus. 
Anderson, Ole Asman, Herman 

Anderson, Gustav Asterman, Oscar 
\v. Aultomen, C. A. 

-son, A. -1782 



Baumeister, John 
Beahan, Edw. 
Behr, Henry 
Bengtsson, John 
on. John 



Bjork, Rudolf 
Blum, M. B. 
Bock, James 
Bohm, August 
Bolin, Charley 



■1421 



Bertelson, O. -2184 Bolstad, Hans J. 



Besseson, Olaf 
Bey, O. -2248 
Binder, H. 
Bjorkholm, A. M. 



Bower, G. 
Brenen, Wm. 
Buchanan, E. 
Buse, Alfred 



..-, A. L. 
Carlsen, Frank 
Carlsen, Hans 
Carlson, August 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Carroll, John J. 
Carter, Sidney 
Cassberg, Gustaf 
Cateches, 
tino 



Catt, Fred. 
Cavanagh, J. E. 
Creely, Tom 
Chamberlin, L. C. 
Christensen, Erling 

Dahlstrom, G. M. 
Dalgard, C. 
Dalley, P. 
l)anielsen, H. 
Dehler, Fred 
Danielsen, N. 
Danielsen, Sigurd 
Danielson, Dave 

Eckart, T. G. 
Eckstrom, George 
Edgterton, John 
Eglit, Hans 
Ehlers, H. 
Eichler, Karl 
Eklund, John 
Ekstedt, Harold 
Ellason, C. 
Ellis, B. 
Ellison, Sam 

Fagerstrom, Oscar 
Ferguson, E. A. 
Figved, Segurd 
Fiol, Robert 
Fjellman, Georg 
Fjellman, J. A. 
Fjellman, Karl 

Gansor, Joe 
Gasch. Nilly 
Gaupseth, Sigurd 



Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Louis 
Christensen, Tony 
Christensen, Viggo 
Christiansen, L. P. 
Christiansen, N. 

-1093 
Christoffersen, Alb. 
c'irul, M. 
Constan- Clausen, Ingeman 
Clipper, Mike 



Conolly, Obirt 
Contreras, Julius 
Cook, Harry 
Crosby, J. 

Is, Frank E. 
De Klerk, D. -925 
De Roos, J. 
De Vries, Albert us 
Dkz. Th. Harry 
Dohlen, Jurgen 
Donahue, R. T. 
Dracar, Edgardo 

Elricht, Fritz 
Engstrom, Edward 
Engstrom, Erik 
Ericson, Arthur 
Ericsson, M. F. A. 
Erikkila, Vilho 
Erikson, Neils 
Eriksen, Peder C. 
Evans, David 
Eugene, John 
Evensen, Louis 

Fredriksen, B. D. 
Fredholm, C. J. 
Fredriksen, F. M. 
Fi.drikson. H. 
Freiberg, Peter 
Fritsch, Leonard 
Fugelutsen, Th. 

Gregersen, John 
Gregg, O. F. 
Griel, Ben 



Gran. Akset -1116 Gulbransen, Bjorn 
Granberg, Fred Gundersen. Jacob 

Granstrom, Nestor Gundersen, K. -899 



Grant, David 
Grant, Otto 
Graugaard. L. J, 
Graves, Edw. L. 

Hecker, "Willie 
Hagman. Jaik 
Hahn, Fritz 



Gunther, Ted 

Gustafson, Axel 
Gutman, Paul 

Haugen, Hans C. 
Haubthoff, Fritz 
Hedenskog, John 



Hakansson, Ingvar Heiberger, M. B 



Hallowes, L. N. 
Hannus, Mikkel 
Hansen, Carl 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, "Viggo 
Hansen, William 
Hansen, Marius 
Hansen, M. -968 
Hansen, W. H. C. 
Hansen, Nikolav 
Hanson, C. 
Hartog, J. 



Hellsten. G. -2168 
Henriksen, Charles 
Herlitz. Knud 
Hetherington, A. T. 
Hetman. Walter 
Hole, Sigvald 
Holm, Carl 
Holmstrom, David 
Holsen, Henry 
Housten, Robert 
967 Hubertz, Emil 
Huotari, J. 



Johannesen, J. 
Johannessen. C. J. 
Johansen, Fritz 



Israelsen, Isak 

Jacobs, Aug. 
Jakobsen, Jakob 
Jacobsen, J. 

Jakobsen. .T. -1865 Johansen! Harry 

Jacobsen, Jack Johansen. Louis 

Jacobsen, Martin .lohanson J 

Johansen. Nikolai Johanson,' John 

Jacobs, Fred Johanson, N A -280 

Jakobsen, Valdemar Johanson, C -2407 

Jansson, F. J. Johanson, J.' -880 

Jenkins, Fred Johansson, Bernard 

Jennlng. George Johansson, Einar 

Jensen, C. -2318 Johansson. J. R 

Jensen, H. -1555 Johansson, W 

Jensen. Henry Johnsen, Jakob 

Jensen, John F. Johnson, C. -1300 

Jensen. L. E. Johnson. Carl 



Johnson, Ole 
Johnson, Pete 
Johnson, Sigurd 
Jordan, Henry S. 
Jorgensen, Robert 



-1220 



Johnson, Evert 
Johnson, I. 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Louis 
Johnson, N. 
Johnson, Norman 

k, August 
Kalberg, W. -688 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Kargar, F. 
Karlson, Karl 
Kelly, Patrick 
Kirppln, Matti 
Klattenhoff, Hans 
Knell, Alex 
Knudsen, Conrad 

Laining, Herman 
Loian, Joe 
Kanlz, Gus 
Kartell, 11. -1677 
Larsen, Johannes 
Kaison, Edward 
Kato, Edvard 
l>uw. John 
Leelkaln, M. 
Lewis, Peter 
Lldsteln 

Kiuuenau, E. 
Lindholm, Nels 

Kind berg, A. J. 
Kink, A. 

-Yiaas, R. A. 
Alack, Edward 
Macker, David 

i, Georg 
Makelainen, Anton 
Malmgvlst, C. 

d, A. H. 
Mansrleld, Harry 

iviaruison, a. -i;jJs Meiners, Herman 
Markmann, Heinr. Alelson, William 
Markmann, M. -lu~9MeyerUierk. H. 
MarkUS, Bernhardt Mikalsen, B. 
Martensen, J. C. Miller, A. E. 



Knudsen. L. 
Knut. Alex 
Koluslos, A. 
Kostur, E. 
Kretschmann, S. M. 
Krlstensen, D. K. 
Kroon, P. 
Kiuit, Alex 
Kuger, Gustav 
Kuhn, John 

Ljungberg, Herman 

N. 
Lohne, Ed. 

Koland, Kouis 
ntsen, K. 
Kulslen, Clias. 
Lundberg, Allan E. 
Lundborg, Oskar 
Lundberg, Xorsten 
Kuud, J. William 
Kuiul, l'eter 
Kunstedt. Chris. 
Lurtin, Paul 
Lynch, James 

Martin, H. 
Mathle8on, Kudvig 
Mayers, Paul M. 
McCann, J. C. 
McCusken, John 
McGlaslan, W. T. 
McManus, P. 
McPherson, Dan. 



2191 

Aiarteusen, O. 
Mathews, R. 
Mathlson, Einar 
Mathsen, Lewis 
Matson, H. 
Martinez, A. 

Nagel, A. 
•Neien, Alf 
Nelson, Carl C. 
Nelson, Ed. 
Ni Ison, J. P. 
Nelson, N. R 



Mogensen, c. 
Moonan, Thomas 
Monsen, Blrger 
Monsen, C. 

Morris, O. R. 
Murphy, Geo. 
Myrhoj, J. P. 

Nikand, Henry 
Nilsen, Hans L. 
Nilsen, N. E. -609 
Nilsson, llilding 
631 Nilsson, Reinhold 
Nord, Karl 



Nelsson, N. E. -552 Nordstrand, A. 
Nerby, Kristian Nor, Niels P. 



Johannesen, Helge Johnson, Ernst 



Newling, George 
Nielsen, Harold 
Nielsen, Hugo 
Nielson, H. J. 
Nikander, Dinar 



North, N. P. 
Nowak, Andy 
Nurm, John A. 
Nutsen, Gus 
Nygren, Gus 



Okozin, M. 

Olsen, A. -13u3 

ulsen, Adrian 

Olsen, C. A. 

Olsen, Chas. 

Olsen, Fred 

Olsen, 11. 

Olsen, Hans 

Olsen, Hans 

Olsen, J. 

Olsen, John 

Olsen, John 

Olsen, L. E. 

Olsen, O. 



Olsen, O. J. -1020 

Olsen, O. P. -1141 

Olsen, Oskar 

Olsen. • O. 1. 
-1315 Olson. Frank 

Olson, Oscar 
-1340 Olson, Otto 

Olsson. James 
-1226 Opderbeck, Eugen 

Oseberg, Anskar 
1222 Osolin, Oscar 

Osterhoff, H. 

Overwick, Thomas 
-1047 



Palken, G. 
Palmquist, Albert 
1'alquist, Albert 
Parsons, Herman 
Paulsen, James 
Pearson, J. A. 
Pearson, Oscar \V. 
Pedersen, Ole 
Pedersen, Paul -896 
Pederson, Charly 
Pedersen, H. S. 
Pedersen, Krist 
Pedersen, Kristian 
Petersen, Wm. 
Pekman, E. 
Peletneky, ii. 

Qunilan, Thos. 

In. Matto 
Kahl, Willy 
Ramstad, Andreas 
Randropp, John 



Petersen, A. -1675 
Petersen, Christian 
Peterson, A. 
Peterson, Chas. 
Peterson, F. 
Petersson, Robert 
Petersson, Robert T. 
Pettersen, o. H. 
Petterson, A. -1622 
Pettersen, F. -1526 
Plate, Diedrick 
Pool. M. 
Post, W. S. 
Pottage, C. E. 
Priehn, A. 



Roalsen, Fred 
Robertson, A. 
Roden, Knut 
Rogirson, Peter 



Rasmussen, J. -446 Rohde, Fritz -1156 



issen, L. 
Rasmussen, S. A. 
Reinnold, Ernst 
Keith, Kurt 
Richard, Fred 
RUs, A. 
Ringdal, R. T. 
Hinkel, H. 
Kisgaard, Soren 



Roos, Bert 
Rosberg, N. 
Roster, Hugo 
Kundqvist. Oskar 
Runge, Charlie 
Rutsid, Fred 
Ryan, Patrick 
Rytko, Otto 



Saari, A. Sjogren, E. 

Saarinen, Hennlng Skjoldenborg, F. P. 
Saarlnen, Kon6tl Skold, C. A. 



Samuelsen, I. 
Sander, Otto 
Sandqvlst. W. V. 
Sanne, Rudolf 
Sarin, C. 
Schauer. Wolf 

lite. Alfred 
Schliemann. F. 
Schmidt, G. 
Schmidt, I. -2827 
Schneider. E. 
Schutt, W. 
Schwarzien, Wil- 
helm 
Sederholm, Anton 
Sederholm, Karl 



is, G. P. 
Simonsen, Oskar 
Smith, J. F. 
Smith, Max 
Snellman, Tor. 
Sorensen, Viggo 
Sprogoe, Theodore 
Stangeland, Petter 
Steen. Ivnr 
Stendahl, John 
Stohr, Erich C. 
Strand, Emil 
Strand, Louis 
Strandquist. Louis 
Straus, Waltor 
Svenson, G. A. 



Seiffert, Johannes Sverdrup, Thorwald 



Seiffert, L. 
Seland, A. 
Selenius, Hj. 
Semseter, Paul 
Shallies, Gust 

Talken. G. 

Tamisar, P. 

Taube, August 

Tellefssen, A. E. 

Tennyson, F. 

Thiessen, Heinrlch Torstenson, Folk 

Thompson, G. E. Trondhjem, F. O. 



Swanson, C. -1050 

Swanson, Oscar 

Swanson. .7. N. 

Swanson, Thomas 



Thorstensen, B. 
Thorstensen, Theo. 
Tillman, A. E. 
Tonissen, P. -1009 
Topel. F. E. 



Thompson, Peter 
Thompson, T. 

Ulla, Charly 

Valfre, George 
Varnsquist, Ernst 
Veckenstedt, Wil- 
liam 
Vesgaard, Jens 
Vestvik, Ingolf 

Wallgren, I. M. 

-1314 
Wapper, John 
Walters, H. J. 
Walter, J. 
Warrer, Harold 
Werth, Gus 
Wege, Willie 

Valdemar 
Wesgaard, Jens 
Werner, Chas. J. 
Wioklund, T. S. 
Wickman, Peter 
Wikstrom, Anton 

Zazan, George 
Ziehr. Ernst 
Zickermann, Hugo 



Tuck. Wm. 
Twede, J. 

Ulricks. Critian 

Vickery, Curtis 
yillemayer, W. 
Vlrtonen, Chas. 
Van Frank, W. 
269 



A. 



Williams, Fred J. 
Williams. J. F. 
Williams. William 
Wills. George 
Wilson, George 
Wlnblad, M. 

Winter. Gotthard 
Wlnther. Hakon H. 
Wirak, A. 
Wischoropp, Fritz 
Wittenberg, Albert 
"Wold, Theodore 
Wyllie, Jas. 



Zirnbauer, Charly 
Zunk, Bruno 



PACKAGES. 

Berllng, J. B. Olsen. H. C. 

Conolly. O. Olsen, O. J. -1020 

Gunvaldsen, Ingvald Olsson, James 

Hanson, Chris. 

Jansson, A. L. 

Jensen. Henry 

Johansen, Nikolai 

Johnson, Norman 

Kornsen, Crist 

Lundquist, Frank 



Osterholm, J. W. 
Opderbeck, Eugen 
Pedersen, H. -1263 
Penlngrud. K. 
Ramstad. Andreas 
Rarly, Frans 
Schlacht. Alfred 



Mathisen, H. -1759 Snellman. Tor 
Mikalsen, Andreas Wikstrom, Carl 
Olsen, Carl -1101 



Miss Howler — Did my voice fill 
the drawing-room? 

Mr. Rood— No, it filled the refresh- 
ment-room and the conservatory. — 
Boston Transcript. 

Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 
Res., Park 6950 

Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 

Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 
Continental Building, on Second Floor 
San Francisco, Cal. 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

•Nuf Sed 



J. MILLER 

124 EAST STREET Garfield 690 

Union Store 

HATS, CAPS, 

FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

Suits Steam Cleaned, $1.50 



White Palace Shoe Store 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market, 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest 
Machinery. :: Work Called For and Delivered. 
WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



IS 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 
Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 60 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week, with all modern 
conveniences. Free Hot and Cold Shower 
Bath on every floor. Elevator Service. 
AXEL, LUNDGREN, Manager 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up, $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Garfield 833 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished Up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: 25, 30 and 
50 cts. per Day. $1.25 per Week and Up. 
Free Baths — Large Reading Room 
1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 
Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



JORTALLBROS.EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



16 FOLSOM STREET 

HOOKS 

Lumber, Crates, Rice, Sugar for all 
kinds of Stevedore Work. 

J. MAHER 



HULTEN $ RUDOLPH 

Formerly Cutter Formerly Tailor 

for Tom Williams for Tom Williams 

TAILORS 

SUITS TO ORDER 

CLEANING and PRESSING 

39 Sacramento Street Near Market 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 



CLASSY CLOTHIER 
HATTER AND FURNISHER 
DOUGLAS SHOES 
UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



PHONE DOUGLAS 1082 
139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Merchant and Washington 



cxyi/^L^cJCJ c See that this label ( in Ught 

^^ %\r J ^_^J M ^^ m^Z* r^i ^^% blue) appears on the box in 



which you are served. 



by Auihonlyoi the Cigaf Makers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

UllilS CTprfrtlT^. thai the Cigars contained .ruhis bo* have teen made by a I IfSlO^SS WorklH3fl, 

3 MEMBER Of iHtClGAB MAKERS 'iNURGATiONAl UNION of America. an organization devoted to the ' 
vancemeniof the MORAL.MATLRlAUnjiMfiilHjALWUfflRLOf THf CflAfT Therefore wcrecomr 
these Cigars to all smokers throughout the world 
' Alt Inlringemenia upon this label will be punched according to law 

W. UlA4foi<t4, Presided, 

CHI UofAmerie* 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Resources. $7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Ginty 

S. Bissinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozio Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Plchon 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Seaberg, No. 2890, a native 
of Russia, age 30, and a member of 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, is 
inquired for by his wife. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. H. Seaberg, Gen. Del., Sac- 
ramento, Cal. 8-30-16 

Will John Baumeister, member of 
the Sailors' Union, will call at the 
office and receive a letter waiting for 
him there. 

Edward Beahan, a native of Cali- 
fornia, supposed to be sailing on the 
Lakes, is inquired for by his brother, 
J. J. Beahan, 2003 Chestnut street, 
Oakland, Cal. S-10-16 

Eugene Martin, age 25, 6 feet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired for by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin, 4231 15 N. E., Seattle, 
Wash. 1-27-15 



PRACTICAL NAVIGATION 

Taught by a practical Navigator. Only 
a limited number of students will be 
accepted, as the teaching will be indi- 
vidual. For rates and other information 
Address, 

H. HEINKE 

NAVIGATION INSTRUCTOR 
Spain and 2d Streets Sonoma, Cal. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 

Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 
and 

17 STEUART STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Now Qualified. — "Aren't you the 
boy who was here a week ago 
looking for a position?" 

"Yes, sir." 

"I thought so. And didn't I tell 
you then that I wanted an older 
boy?" 

"Yes, sir; that's why I'm here 
now." — Brooklyn Citizen. 



Thwarted Ambition. — "When I was 
a boy," said the gray-haired phy- 
sician, who happened to be in a 
reminiscent mood, "I wanted to be 
a soldier; but my parents persuaded 
me to study medicine." 

"Oh, well," rejoined the sympa- 
thetic druggist, "such is life. Many 
a man with wholesale aspirations 
has to content himself with a retail 
business." — Tit-Bits. 



She Needed Aid. — "See that man 
over there? He is a bombastic mult, 
a windjammer nonentity, a false 
alarm, and an encumbrance of the 
earth!" 

"Would you mind writing all that 
down for me?" 

"Why, in the world—" 

"He', my husband and I should 
like to use it on him some time." 
— Brooklyn Citizen. 



News from Abroad. 



An insurance policy of £1000 has 
been taken out at Lloyd's for a 
premium of 84 per cent, to pay a 
total loss if peace is not declared 
before the end of this year. 

In the first six months of 1916 
45 new vessels, with a total tonnage 
of 27,626 gross tons, were registered 
in Sweden. Of these, 22 vessels of 
11,710 gross tons were built in Swe- 
den; the remainder were bought 
abroad. 

During the week the only nautical 
incident of importance was the sink- 
ing of a French diver by an Austro- 
Hungarian aviator. Berlin reported 
a considerable number of losses 
among allied merchantmen, but noth- 
ing sufficient to be of any military 
significance. 

Greece is still divided against her- 
self. The people — if we may judge 
from the elections — are in favor of 
participation on the side of the allies, 
but the Government is inclined to be 
witli the monarchy, which is strongly 
pro-German. The probabilities are 
that both sides will regard Greece as 
of no moment. 

The Vickers Co. has presented a 
petition to the Argentine Congress 
asking for the suspension of the 
dates fixed by law for the construc- 
tion of dry docks and mechanical 
workshops for the building and re- 
pairing of ships and mechanical 
works in general. The suspension is 
solicited until the termination of the 
war in Europe. 

The 21st of September saw the 
seventh month of the siege of Ver- 
dun, but it was marked by no 
changes of importance. Whatever 
alterations took place were in favor 
of the allies. Both sides are now 
agreed that far too much was made 
of Verdun. Had it been the center 
of attack during the earlier days of 
the war it must have fallen as did 
Liege and Namur, but with the time 
left in which to think, the French 
established a new and altogether dif- 
ferent kind of defense. 

As is well known, the greater part 
of the Norwegian mercantile marine 
is engaged in the tramp trade, but 
of late a change has been going on, 
and a number of new companies 
have been established for running 
regular lines. In 1910 there were 
only 116 steamers of 130,344 tons 
being operated by liner companies, 
but on January 1, 1916, the number 
had increased to 170 steamers of 
298,275 tons. In relation to the 
whole of the Norwegian mercantile 
marine, the vessels used on regular 
lines were only 8.8 per cent., but by 
the end of 1915 the percentage had 
increased to 14. 

Despite the prominence given to 
the battles in the western front, 
everything turns upon the course of 
events in the east. Has Mackensen 
been victorious, as reported by Ber- 
lin, or has he been defeated as re- 
ported by London? Upon this issue 
depends all of moment during the 
past week's war reports. At latest 
advices Mackensen was on the de- 
fensive, but to-morrow may bring 
fresh news of battle, with a possi- 
ble change. As anticipated both 
sides are massing for an eastern of- 
fensive, with a view to saving or 
losing the communication between 
Berlin and Constantinople. In the 
west Germany is apparently losing, 
but evidently she knows that the tide 
of battle is not to be changed in that 
direction. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits. 



What Did He Mean?— She— Is 
Princeton in New York? 

Student (truthfully reflective)— 
Yes, a great part of the time. — 
Princeton Tiger. 



Hadn't Harmed Them.— Visitor— 
My good man, you keep your pigs 
much too near the house. 

Cottager— That's just what the doc- 
tor said, mum. But I don't sec how 
it's agoin' to hurt 'em. — Punch. 



Well Qualified.— "The girl who 
washes our dishes tells me she is 
going to work in a munition-factory." 
"Think she will do well at it?" 
"Oh, yes. Her duty is to break 
iron things to fill shells for shrapnel." 
—Life. 



A Desperate Criminal— Heiny— See 
that woman across the street? 

Omar— Yes. What of her? 

Heiny— She's a female train-robber. 

Omar— Is that so? 

Heiny— Yes. She invented the 
sawed-oflf skirt.— Indianapolis Star. 



Still.— Tradesman (who has been at 
the telephone for a quarter of an 
hour, to his apprentice')— Here, Wil- 
liam, take the receiver, as long as 
my wife is talking to me. You don't 
need to make any reply; only when 
she asks, "Are you still there, 
James?" say, "Yes, Amelia, dear."— 
Liverpool Globe. 



The Prayer He Needed.— The fol- 
lowing amusing incident was wit- 
nessed the other day at a London 
railway terminus. A Salvation Army 
lassie was selling the War Cry at the 
windows of he trains. In one of the 
compartments were a number of 
"knuts," and one of them, thinking 
to have some fun at the expense of 
the sister, asked if she would offer 
up a word of prayer for him. 

Rising to the occasion, the sister 
put her hand on his head and, to 
the amusement of those within hear- 
ing distance, replied: 

"O Lord, make this young man's 
heart as soft as his head."— Tit- 
Bits. 



An Invitation 

We invite deposits from every one — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cat. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




Union Label of the 
UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are 
counterfeits. 

JOHN W. SCULLEY, President MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary-Treasurer 

Rooms 72-73 Bible House, New York City 







STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 
NOTICE! BOSS OF ROAD 
OVERALLS— PRICE, 80 CENTS 

Phone Douglas 1737 



Demand the Union Label 



Did you ever stop to think that 
there is from one-half to one ounce 
more Tobacco in the 10c Pouches 
GOLD SHORE CUT PLUG 
SMOKING than in the advertised 
10c tins, and not any better Tobacco 
grows than the BAGLEY CO. put 
in GOLD SHORE. Why buy tin 
cans to throw away, when the pouch 
is so much more practical as a pocket 
package, and contains more Tobacco? 

9T -»° \a—i finKirtlMrtj ol tin t-»- «g . •»,■»-* «t 

IiMAmmftKw^gws^iaaiunoKiu. I UINIOrN 
o— « <^lZ— w^w„fcw. | MA.DE 
■■■■ mi ■!■■!■ gM nw» un m m^Jt 



Christensen's Navigation School 

Established 1906 

ON AND AFTER JAN. 1, 1916, CHRISTENSEN'S NAVIGATION SCHOOL 
WILL BE LOCATED AT ROOM 242, HANSFORD BUILDING. 
ENTRANCE AT 25 CALIFORNIA AND 268 MARKET STS. 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 




. 53 






Upholding American 
PROSPERITY 




The key to Prosperity Is Saving! 
So make up your mind to prosper 
by buying one of Hale's $1.00 Banks 
for only 50c. It Is the best possible 
way to teach the children thrift and 
the vital principles of saving. We 
keep the key, and you can only open 
the Bank by bringing It to Hale's. 
Do what you wish with the money. 
Banks on Sale at Transfer Desk. 




Market at Fifth 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 

in 4 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



H. SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING $ GENTS 

FURNISHING GOODS 



WE HAVE NO BRANCH STORES— ONLY ONE BIG STORE 
Watch Repairing Guaranteed Two Years 

The Popular Price Jewelry Store 

715 MARKET STREET Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 




693 THIRD STREET, San Francisco 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



BFD SEAL CMAB CO., MANUrACTUBffiS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



"YOUR HATTER" 
FRED AMMANN 



72 MarKet Street 
San Francisco 



Union Hats 



Jewelers, Watchmakers and 



James Ji.Sorensen Opticians 

ufrei. ana Jrtau * 

Everything Bought or Repaired at Our Store is Positively Guaranteed 



Cfttfr BusTtn 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



S 





2>€ 






> k 1 Pa^ 




twva^^.w -e^r^^r-v. ^~i-\.^:^7gssig.>>^^^z 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXX, No. 4. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1916. 



Whole No. 2402. 



AFTER THE WAR— WHAT? 



Labor's Part in the Readjustment Following the War. 



The New York Annalist, a weekly journal 
of finance, recently submitted two very pertinent 
questions to a number of prominent Americans 
in various walks of life, as follows: 

1. Will the condition of American labor be 
improved or harmed by the conditions resulting 
from the war? 

2. And will the system of collective bargain- 
ing gain or lose in strength? 

To the foregoing, President Gompers, of the 
American Federation of Labor, made the fol- 
lowing instructive reply: 

The determination of the second condition will 
determine the first, for upon the maintenance of 
collective bargaining will depend the maintenance 
of opportunities for the workers for continued 
improvement and a spirit able and alert to 
make most of such opportunities. 

Significance of Collective Bargaining. 

In order to avoid misunderstanding, the sig- 
nificance attached to collective bargaining is that 
of implying voluntary institutions, voluntary 
collective action of workers to protect and 
promote their own interests. Collective bargain- 
ing is opposed to State intervention in and regu- 
lation of personal industrial relations which 
rightly belong outside the domain of State 
activity. 

There can be no doubt that in our country 
voluntary institutions have been more firmly 
established as a result of the war. Practically 
the whole burden of readjustment to meet war 
conditions, industrial, commercial, and financial, 
has been assumed by private companies, corpo- 
rations, and employers. That these problems 
have been met and adjusted is due to the wis- 
dom, ability, and ingenuity of voluntary action 
of citizens — employes and employers; the latter 
interested in the industry, commerce, and finan- 
cial institutions for advantages to be secured 
for themselves; the former representing the 
interests of the people — the human side — that 
they may be protected physically, their rights 
maintained, and be assured rightful participation 
in the returns from the products of their toil. 

The best interests of neither employers nor 
employes result from chance but from plans in 
accord with principles established by experience 
and the best thought and from intelligent efforts 
to make such plans effective. This means organ- 
ization — agencies to express the will of the 
people concerned. 

The Human Side of Production. 

Organization of wage-earners precedes pres- 
entation of demands and collective bargaining 
which affects directly affairs of life and work. 
The shorter workday means different workers — 
workers improved physically, mentally, socially; 
higher wages mean a better life, the means to 
secure the necessities and opportunities of life. 
These are the fundamental purposes of organiza- 
tion — purposes of vital importance to the nation. 
Secured by voluntary effort they are the essence 
of intelligent democracy — welfare secured with- 
out menace to any interest or right. 

During the past months our concepts of what 
ought to be the standards of social and industrial 
society, as well as the institutions now in exist- 
ence, have been subjected to many tests. The 



distress and the suffering that have come upon 
fellow-workers in countries involved in war 
make us question our own institutions, whether 
or not they are founded upon a real understand- 
ing of the service that each individual renders 
to society and upon concepts of real values and 
whether they would endure similar trials. In a 
time of prosperity even a badly conceived plan 
or organization may bring some temporary 
profit, but only those things that are founded 
upon truths can endure a great cataclysm or 
the tests of time. 

The European situation is demonstrating a 
principle that the American trade movement has 
avowed, that is, that power has been gravitating 
from political institutions and agencies and is 
now centred in economic. 

While the European war is being fought by 
the soldiers on the battlefield its outcome will 
be determined by the economic resources, 
strength, and organization of the contending 
forces in the war. The nations who are pre- 
pared to concentrate their industrial and com- 
mercial strength where the greatest advantage 
can be secured with the most dependable, 
resourceful and capable workers engaged in the 
work of production will be able to furnish their 
armies with the supplies necessary to win the 
military struggle. The country that is not or- 
ganized for efficient production cannot success- 
fully contend against a military opponent that 
has given thought to working out a definite 
plan for the development of national resources 
and for making that plan intelligently effective. 

Fundamental Purposes of Organization. 

The developments in the war situation also 
prove conclusively that organization of the 
human side of production is just as important 
as the material side. Resourceful, capable 
workers who do their part in production with 
a dignity that comes from proper appreciation 
of their importance in the work and of their 
relations to all other factors in production are 
indispensable to the best development and the 
continued progress of any nation from the 
standpoint of material civilization. 

The effects of the war have proved just as 
clearly as the effects of peace that there is but 
one agency that is really potential in securing 
for the wage-earners the protection, conserva- 
tion and opportunities for continued develop- 
ment. No country will secure workers who will 
give the best service in industry and commerce 
without making some definite plan toward that 
end. The experience of all of the ages show 
that this can best be secured through the efforts 
of enlightening self-interest. The wage-earners 
know their own problems, their own interests 
better than outsiders can know them. They 
have been able to protect themselves and to 
secure these things through their own efforts, 
when they are assured opportunity for organ- 
ization and for the doing of those things — the 
exercise of their normal activities — so necessary 
to make organization effective. 

Organized labor has made for itself a place in 
the organization of industry, society and govern- 
ment. It has made and it holds that place be- 
cause it performs a very necessary function not 
only for the workers but for the best operation 



and management of industry and commerce, and 
therefore for the best interests of the whole of 
society. Labor organizations are inseparable 
from a democratic organization in any of its 
relations. 

The warring countries have found that not 
only are organizations of workers an important 
part of society, but they must be recognized 
and dealt with when the interest and welfare of 
the workers are at issue. What is true in war 
times is true also in times of peace, although 
our attention may not be called to the fact so 
forcibly when the existence of the nation is not 
immediately threatened. However, there are 
insidious dangers to national progress and wel- 
fare which, though they work slowly, work none 
the less effectively and surely. Whether it be 
in times of peace or war, the workers know 
they must put their hope of security, protec- 
tion and progress in the organized labor move- 
ment. 

The Destructive Effects of the War. 

When the destructive, disorganizing effects 
of the war first broke upon our industries and 
commerce, it seemed as though the whole organ- 
ization would be wiped out of existence, but 
after the first shock the steadying forces began 
the work of readjustment. There was one force 
that did much to halt the cumulative disasters 
that threatened to wreck our industrial world — 
the organized labor movement — which stood 
for principles of human welfare and refused to 
permit the lowering of standards necessary to 
protect the workers. The cumulative effects of 
lowering wages, reducing opportunities for em- 
ployment and increasing the number of unem- 
ployed are just as disastrous to the financial 
and industrial world as is diminishing oppor- 
tunities for the use of capital or the closing of 
markets and trade routes. 

The organization of workers does, on the 
human side of production, what organization of 
capital does on the other side. The organized 
labor movement helped to shorten this period 
of readjustment following war conditions, pro- 
tect the wage-earners during that time, and has 
enabled them to secure a more just share of 
the benefits that have come from war prosperity 
and from the unusual opportunities open to our 
trade at the present time. Wherever the workers 
are organized they have secured the shorter 
work day and higher wages. 

Organization Develops Independence. 

Organization develops in the individual a 
resourceful, independent spirit that knows its 
just rights and is not willing to accept less. 
Where there is a will for justice, whether 
economic, political or social, justice finds recog- 
nition. What the organized workers have been 
able to accomplish has put new hope and spirit 
into many that were previously unorganized, 
almost demoralized. In many lines of employ- 
ment there has been a great revival of organiza- 
tion and an effort to secure better advantages 
for workers who have previously endured heavy 
lindens and oppression. What the workers have 
secured they will never consent to lose — they 
will never be satisfied with lower standards. 

The European situation has made a marked 
difference in the number of immigrants to our 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



country. This has been accompanied by emigra- 
tion of workers to other countries. As a result 
the number of workers available for employment 
itly reduced, and they are workers with 
higher demands and standards. This situation 
has been sufficient to instill hope into even the 
iron and steel workers, who recently made a 
successful effort to secure higher wages. 

Employers are feeling this new spirit of the 
workers. Some, as the Bethlehem Steel Com- 
pany, are forestalling^ demands and granting 
higher wages before tlley are demanded. As a 
result of war conditions, organization and the 
spirit of organization have taken on new vigor 
and vitality. The workers are beginning to 
appreciate the fact as never before that organ- 
ization is necessary to protect and promote 
their interests in all relations of life. They 
see in foreign countries as well as in the home 
situation that only through organization are they 
granted fittintr and adequate representation in 
the determination of those things that vitally 
affect their welfare as well as in the conditions 
of work. Organization touches and concerns all 
of the relations of the workers. 

Greater Opportunities for Freedom. 

What the outcome of the present European 
war will be no one can foretell, but without 
predicting which side will win there will be some 
tunity at the close of the war and in the 
period of reconstruction following the war to 
secure greater opportunities for freedom and for 
justice to all the people of all the countries. 

It will depend upon the people themselves 
just how those opportunities are used. It will 
depend in a large degree upon the wage-earners 
what degree of progress is made for democracy 
and for the cause of humanity. The wage-earners 
through their organizations are those primarily 
ned in human problems and human inter- 
ests. The organized labor movement is com- 
posed of the only organizations that are devoted 
wholly and solely to the cause of humanity. 
The wage-earners are demanding and assuming 
an increasingly important part that the wage- 
earners have in society— a part more in keep- 
ing with their rights, service and welfare. They 
will not consent to go backward. The wage- 
earners, through their organizations, can secure 
fitting recognition for their service and for their 
rights if they unite solidly in their demands. 
There is no power of greed or injustice or 
despotism that can withstand the force of human 
beings banded together solidly for human rights 
and human justice, conscious of their power 
and able to use it effectively. 

And thus the two questions are answered. 
I may add that every effort made to improve 
the conditions of the worker must necessarily 
include the industrial and commercial life of 
our nation as well as make it more beloved 
by a grateful, patriotic, and humanitarian citizen- 
ship. 



REFUSING TO ARBITRATE. 



Contempt for popular intelligence is 
shown in the claim that the railroad broth- 
erhoods' attitude toward arbitration ac- 
counts for the refusal to arbitrate of Presi- 
dents Shonts of New York City's street 
railway company. The anti-labor press so 
comments on that refusal. It must take for 
granted that the public has forgotten the 
many refusals of monopolistic corporations 
to arbitrate labor difficulties. These re- 
fusals extend over a long period of time 
before the railroad brotherhoods had a 
chance to consider an offer of that kind. 
If the precedent alleged to have been set 
by the brotherhoods may be cited as a 
valid excuse for Mr. Shonts, then the broth- 
ci hoods' action may be accounted for by 
the numerous older precedents which cor- 
poration apologists forget to mention. — The 
Public. 



We declare war with the wages system, 
which demoralizes the life of the lurer and 
the lured, cheats both and enslaves the 
workingman ; war with the present system 
of finance, which robs labor, and gorges 
capital, makes the rich richer and the poor 
poorer, and turns a republic into an aris- 
tocracy of capital : war with those lavish 
grants of the public lands to speculating 
companies, and whenever in power we 
pledge ourselves to use every just ami 
legal means to resume all such grants 
heretofore made. — Wendell Phillips. 



COMPENSATION FOR SEAMEN. 



San Francisco, September IS. 1916. 

Editor Coast Seamen's Journal: 

hi (lie absence of congressional legisla- 
tion upon the subject, the Industrial Acci- 
dent Commission of the State of Cali- 
fornia, is, 1 think, within the law in holding 
that the Workmen's Compensation Act ap- 
plies to seamen who arc residents of this 
State, and who ship in ports of this State 
on a vessel owned by Californians. The 
practical working of this phase of the law 
in certain cases, however, requires the 
serious attention of the Legislature, in or- 
der that those entitled to benefits under 
the law may get any good from it. This, 
I think, can be best illustrated by con- 
sidering concrete examples of the cases I 
have in mind. 

Since the law went into effect, the "Fran- 
cis H. Leggett," the "Hanalei," the "Santa 
Clara." and the "Roanoke"' have been lost. 
The number of the officers and crews of 
these vessels who lost their lives is more 
than 100. (There have, of course, been 
many other cases where the loss of life was 
not so great). It is a moderate estimate 
in say that more than 250 persons were 
dependent for support upon those so lost, 
And what have these dependents received 
in the way of benefits? NOT ONE CENT. 
The natural inquiry, of course, is How 
can that possibly be? And the answer to 
that question, while necessarily technical, 
is worth taking some trouble to under- 
stand. Briefly, it is this : 

When such a wreck occurs, the owner 
of the vessel for the voyage is entitled 
under the federal law to limit his liability 
(including death claims') to the value of 
the vessel and her freight pending in all 
cases where the loss was occasioned or 
occurred without his privity or knowledge. 
Such privity or knowledge is scarcely ever 
proved. The value of the vessel and her 
t pending, after such wreck, is usu- 
ally very little indeed or nothing. The em- 
ployer of labor on shore cannot limit his 
liability in any similar manner. For in- 
stance : 

If the chauffeur of a motor truck is in 
collision with another truck and both 
drivers are killed and both machines arc 
smashed to smithereens, the employer of 
each driver is liable to the driver's de- 
pendents for the full amount of the com- 
pensation allowed by the law: he cannot 
limit his liability to the value of the frag- 
ments of the dray and the freight earned 
on that trip. Put if two vessels are in 
collision and both sink to the bottom and 
all hands on each ship are lost, and no 
freight has been earned, each owner can 
pocket his insurance money on the ship 
(which insurance money cannot be reached 
in any way) and pay absolutely nothing for 
the great loss of life on each vessel. 

It certainly must be clear that here is a 
frightful opportunity given to the im- 
pecunious speculator to gamble in human 
life, with little or no risk to himself. Say 
that two or three speculators of this kidney, 
who are execution proof, scrape up enough 
money between them to charter two or 
three rotten old vessels when freights are 
high and send them to sea with the freight 
to be earned well insured. They 
take a charter that makes them owner For 
the voyage and the employer of the crew. 
Suppose the vessel sinks and all hands (50 



or 60 in number) are drowned. If the 
speculators can show that personally they 
knew nothing of the unseaworthiness of the 
vessel, because they left it to the master 
of the vessel or to the port captain to see 
that she went to sea all right, then they 
limit their liability to nothing. And usually 
it isn't hard to show that. If, however, it 
is shown that they did personally know the 
vessel was unfit to go to sea, and the 
beneficiaries of those lost get judgments 
against them, the beneficiaries would still 
be as far away from their money as ever, 
because of course you can't get money 
from an execution-proof defendant any 
easier than you can get milk from a male 
tiger. 

So that the vital question as to the sea- 
farer is this : 

Is there any way of changing the com- 
pensation law so that the beneficiary will 
be certain of obtaining the compensation 
allowed by the Accident Commission in 
death cases? 

I think this certainty of compensation 
could be brought about by so amending 
the law that every California employer of 
employes within the provisions of the law 
be compelled to carry sufficient accident in- 
surance to cover all probable personal in- 
juries and death claims, and that such 
insurance be carried only with underwriters 
doing business in this State who can be 
served with process. 

Of course such an amendment would 
be attacked as unconstitutional ; but that 
is the fate of all new laws made for the 
benefit of the employe; and if it be con- 
stitutional to make the employer liable for 
compensation where there has been no neg- 
ligence on his part, it would seem that the 
proposed amendment could also be upheld. 

It may be admitted that such an amend- 
ment would add greatly to the labors of 
the Commission, but that would not be an 
objection if it made compensation certain; 
and certainty of compensation, I take it, is 
the whole object of such statutes. One of 
the objects of the compensation law was 
to do away with lawyers' fees and give 
the whole of the compensation to the bene- 
ficiary. In the cases to which I have re- 
ferred lawyers are necessary. Every step 
toward certainty is a step toward the com- 
plete elimination of lawyers' fees. 

If we are to have certainty, we must 
have this change or something along the 
same lines, or else the compensation fund 
must be raised by the State by taxation. 
For, in addition to the cases referred to in 
which compensation has not been paid, 
there must always be a certain percentage 
of others that are not paid because the em- 
ployer is execution proof. 

1 would, therefore, suggest that the mari- 
time unions and the licensed officers' asso- 
ciations take the matter up with the State 
Federation of Labor with a view to having 
that body make some such amendment a 
part of its legislative program. 
(Signed) F. R. WALL. 



8 HOURS VS. $80,000. 



The 8-hour day is typified by Hughes as 
"the surrender of principle to physical 
force." That is likewise the position of 
the general manager of the railroad propa- 
ganda, who receives a salary of $80,000 a 
year. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Oppose Controlled Labor. 

"Slavery existed only for the purpose of 
controlling labor. Compulsory arbitration 
is suggested only for the purpose of con- 
trolling labor. Wherein is there any funda- 
mental difference?" asks Secretary Olander 
of the Illinois State Federation of Labor. 

"What is the fundamental difference be- 
tween a free man and a slave? Both work, 
and each may labor in the service of an- 
other. Either may have a short or a long 
workday, and may receive pay from the 
employer. Yet the free man makes prog- 
ress that is impossible to the slave. What 
is the great difference between them? 

"Is it not that the free man has the 
right to refuse to continue in service, that 
he may stop work, that he can quit his 
job without any fear of the law? And that 
the slave may not do this? That the slave 
is prevented by force of law? Do not all 
other differences between the two, the 
free man and the slave, grow out of this 
one fundamental difference? 

"Compulsory arbitration denies the right 
to strike, and this denies the right to quit 
work and holds the laborer to his job 
against his will. Slavery, I tell you. 

"But, you say, a third party is to hear 
the case, a decision is to be rendered and 
justice done to the worker. 

"Don't you know, brother, that every 
slave State the world has ever known has 
had laws to 'protect' the slaves? Compul- 
sory arbitration, the law holding the 
worker in the service of the employer, is a 
slave institution. The law decided for the 
man, instead of the man deciding for him- 
self, and thus made the man a slave. To 
say that compulsory arbitration will not 
interfere with the right of the individual to 
quit his job is rank mockery. Forbid the 
individual to act with his fellows and he is 
helpless." 



Dangers in Mattress Making. 

The New York State Commission, acting 
under authority of a law passed by the last 
legislature, is attempting to enforce sani- 
tary conditions in the mattress industry. 
In a recent speech to manufacturers of 
bedding, Dr. Roos, medical inspector of the 
Department of Labor, said : 

"Early in the week I noted the large 
percentage of disease among the men em- 
ployed in mattress factories and presented 
the facts to the Bureau of Industrial 
Hygiene which ordered a survey made and 
my department visited all the larger plants 
in New Work City, 97 in all, and the con- 
ditions we found were simply appalling. In 
most of the plants dust lay thick on the 
floors, machines, walls and even on the 
ceilings — the very atmosphere was per- 
meated with it and fully 20 per cent., on an 
average, of the workmen were suffering 
from tuberculosis while others had various 
forms of skin and eruptive diseases. Some 
of the factories were in cellars, others in 
converted tenement houses, former stables, 
etc., and few had any adequate system of 
ventilation or proper toilet facilities. 

"In many factories there were piles of 
second-hand mattresses lying around, 



which the manufacturers said were to be 
remade for private parties, etc., and in one 
place we found about 75 mattresses that 
had come from a Bowery lodging house 
and you can imagine the dirt, filth, vermin 
and disease they carried. There can be no 
doubt that these mattresses were to be 
made up — not for private parties, but as 
part of new goods." 



Injunction Judge Scorned by Workers. 

Judge Van Zile trudged up the long 
stairs to the county jail at Detroit and 
offered freedom to five striking pattern 
makers, who had been jailed by him for 
violating an injunction, if they would 
promise to discontinue picketing. 

When Judge Van Zile; sentenced these 
workers he thundered on the sacredness 
of property and personal liberty which cost 
this nation billions of dollars to establish. 

But this wise and fearless expounder of 
justice, who told his victims he is a can- 
didate for re-election, is shown in another 
light as he offered freedom on his terms. 
"I thought you'd like to get in the Labor 
Day parade to-morrow," he whined. 

The pattern makers said they would give 
him a reply later, and when their visitor 
had retired they jointly signed the follow- 
ing letter and forwarded it to Judge Van 
Zile's residence by special messenger : 

"Relative to your conference with us this 
afternoon, we submit the following answer 
to your proposition to release us from jail 
after being confined here for fourteen days, 
to wit : 

"Under no consideration will we sur- 
render our constitutional rights to satisfy 
any employer of labor. 

"We hold that no one man has the 
right to deny us the privilege of passing 
any shop whether on strike or not, or to 
prevent us from talking to any man with 
the object in view of joining our organiza- 
tion to better his conditions in life." 

Judge Connolly subsequently ordered the 
release of the five striking pattern makers 
on bonds of $500 each until the Supreme 
Court passes on the decision of Judge 
Van Zile, who fined and sentenced these 
unionists to jail for violating an injunction 
not to picket or visit the homes of strike- 
breakers. 

Judge Connolly's order was contested by 
attorneys representing the Detroit Manu- 
facturers' Association. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Demand Human Rights. 

A special committee on injunctions, ap- 
pointed by the recent Illinois State Feder- 
ation of Labor convention and a special 
conference of State unionists held last May 
in Chicago, asked primary candidates for 
attorney general, State senators and State 
representatives for their views on labor's 
injunction-limitation bill. 

The workers said : 

"This bill is regarded by organized labor 
as the most important measure to be in- 
troduced at the coming session of tin- 
Illinois legislature. Its purpose is to re- 
store to the working people of Illinois 
fundamental rights, including those of free 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
l.eiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marilimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Bcncdictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road. 
1 >m ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The national war savings commit 
of the United Kingdom lias . 
d the following report with re- 
spect to the sale of war savings 
certificates and postofnee exchequer 
bonds during the week ended July 
22: 15s. 6d. war savings certifici 
issued on Monday, July 17, £388,805; 
Tuesday, July 18, £516,396; Wed 
day, July 19, £585,346; Thursday, 
July 20, £375,837; Friday, July 21, 
£536,244; Saturday, July 22, MS23,- 
407; total for the week, £2,926,035; 
aggregate to date, £14,385,980. Post- 
office exchequer bonds (£5, £20 and 
£50): Previously reported, applica- 
tions, 819,000; value, £26,850,000. 
Issued in week ended July 22, ap- 
plications 28,000, value £700,000; 
total applications, 847,000; value, 
£27,350,000. 

U. S. Consul George S. Messer- 
smith, of Curacao, Dutch West In- 
dies, reports that for the first time 
in many years, probably for the first 
time in the history of this island, 
there is need for more laborers than 
there are now on the island. The 
construction of the petroleum re- 
finery near Willemstad gives steady 
employment to hundreds of laborers 
who formerly worked at the docks 
in transshipping cargo and in coaling 
vessels. The withdrawal of these 
men has made necessary the import- 
ation of laborers from the neigh- 
boring islands of Bonaire and Aruba. 
A cargo of coal from the United 
States is now being discharged by 
women, some 150 being necessary. 
It is said that this is the first time 
in the history of the island that it 
has been necessary to employ women 
on this kind of work, 

The Sanitary Inspectors' Associa- 
tion of Scotland, at its annual con- 
ference held in Perth, discussed the 
question of "The Housing of the 
Working Classes." Peter Fyfe, Glas- 
gow, urged the claims of a new 
plan, that of building these houses 
with concrete blocks. In this way 
cheaper houses could be built, which 
would give more elbow room to 
those who lived in them. The 
houses were, he said, far too small, 
because so expensive to build. He 
maintained that houses should be 
limited to three stories, tenants 
should have the use of a bath and a 
larder for keeping perishable goods. 
In England, Mr. Fyfe pointed out, 
it has been possible to build cottages 
of concrete blocks at from 2.8 to 
3.9d. per cubic foot against a cost 
of 6d. in Glasgow for shops and 
houses harled over with cement. 
According to the Berne corre- 
tdent of the Paris paper, l'Evene- 
ment, the general council of the 
Belgian Labor party, which consists 
of representatives of all the Socialist 
federations of Belgium, recently "held 
a meeting at Brussels, at which the 
following resolution was passed 
unanimously: "The Belgian Labor 
party is determined to endure all 
miseries and sufferings rather than 
submit to a premature and tempo- 
rary peace. The Allies must not 
imagine that they have got to hasten 
on our account. We are not asking 
for peace, and the demonstrations 
of Socialists belonging to neutral 
countries have nothing to do with 
us. We would ask those who are 
concerned about us not to let them- 
es be influenced by the idea 
that we are wanting peace. We arc 
passing this last resolution with the 
hope of averting the disastrous effect 
that this argument might have." 



C. B. CANNON 



San Pedro Letter List. 



CANNON $ BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON STREETS .... SAN PEDRO 



HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS phone w j 

NATIONAL HOTEL 

MRS. ALBERT H. RYAN, Prop. 

FURNISHED ROOMS 

50c Per Day and Up — $2 Per Week and Up 

No. 270 FOURTH STREET SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



TAILORING Fancy Price 



REMOVAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

S. G. SWANSON KS BEST W 

who has been established since 1904 on Beacon Street, between 6th and 7th 

IS NOW located on the 2nd floor BANK OF SAN PEDRO BLDG., 
entrance 110 WEST 6th STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL., 

Where he Is better prepared, because of Much lesser rent, to give the trade the 
advantage of lower prices and as formerly, special care Is given to garments en- 
trusted to him for Cleaning, Repairing and Pressing. 

Note— Clothes also cut, trimmed and made from your own cloth with the 
Union Label too. The new woolens are now ready for your inspection, how about 
your order? 



E. BLAIZE Acne, T. 

Andersen, John 
Andersson, Oskar 
Hergman. Leo 
Button, Roswcll 
Besly, C. 
Brien. Hans 
Bro, Emil 
Bentsen, Hans B. 
Bushman. John 
Cooley, H. 
Christophersen, C. 
Carlson, Harry 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Doyle, William 
Dahlstrom, G. 
Edlund, Konrad 
Franks, Chas. 
Fjellman, Jonas 
Fugelutsen. Thor 
Fjellman, Karl 
Guseck, Bernhard 
Ginar. Walter 
Grigolelt, E. 

urg, Martin 
Hedman, John M. 
TTorlin. Ernest 
Henricksen, H. C. 
Hedlund, Olaf 
Heesche, Henry 
Holmstrom. Fritz 
llaupt. Fritz 
Hansen, Charley 
Hansen, Ole 
Hoversen, Carl 
Jacobsen, Lars 
.Tohanson, John 
Johnson, Jack 
Tanson, Oscar 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Street*, San Pedro,* Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



Mills, Elbert ® Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 
FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers In — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hadl 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



MIchaelsen. Andrew 
Maurice. Francois 
Muller. Henry 
McNeal, John 
Makela, N. 
Malm, Gustaf 
Nllsen, Nils E. 
Nilsen, Oskar 
Nilsen, Oskar J. 
Olsen, J. P. 
Orllng, Gust 
Owen, Fred 
Pedersen, Alf 
Pelz, Fritz 
Petrow, A. 
Peterson. H. -1064 
Plntz, Johan 
Peterson, Hugo 

-on. C. V. 
Pakki, Emil 
Pederson, Ole 
Rickman, Herman 
Ryden, Oskar 
Roe, Victor 
Robertson, A. 
Rush, Charlie 
Rles, J. H. 
Raun, Einar 
Rudd, Walter 
Skaanes, Egil 
Pjoblom, G. A. 
Sprogue, Th. 
Stenberg, Alfred 
Svenningsen, S. N. 
Simpson, L. C. 
Samuelsson, Frank 
Smith. Johan 
Soderlund, Anton 
Schmidt. Louritz P. 



Johnsson, J. A. -1659Strom. C. L. 

son, Victor Sandblom, Konrad 
Kluff N Thorsen, Carl 

Kalla's M Tennlsen, Andrew 

Kolodzle, 'George T'llman Axel 

ip, Edward TThlig, Richard 
KalUo, Anton CJlappa, Kosti 

Lundqulst, Abraham Welson, Julius (Reg. 
n H. Letter) 

nan. Gust Wlschkar, Ernst 



Lorenz, Bruno 
Lutzen, Valdemar 
T. arson, Max 
Lindberg, Ernst 
Leldeker, Filth 
Martin, John B. 



Wikman, P. 
White. Robert 
Warkkala, John 
Newspapers and 
Packages. 
Schmidt, Lauritz P. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 



San Francitc*. 



Bergman, John Johnsen, Aug. 

Blom, Ernest Konlg, D. 

Christiansen, Anton Nielsen, Harold 

Christiansen, A. Olander. Ed 

Doris. Geo. Thomson, John 
Eckart, T. G. 



A SAILORS BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA-FARING MEN 



IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per" cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, the bank 

carries on hand at all times an ample supply of Swedish, Norwegian 

and Danish SKr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



Honolulu, H. T. 

Anderson. John E. Nelsen, C. T. 

Burk. Harry -1284 Petersen Carl 

Crantlv, C. W. Peters, Walter 

F.usenio. John Reither. Fritz 

ind, Rlckhard Solnerg. B. P. 

1%-ertsen. Sigvald B. Strand, Conrad 

T.pnKwenus, W. L. Thompson. Emil N. 
Moller, F. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Edstrom, alias Brynjulf Ed- 
strom, born in Norway in 1879, was 
last heard from at Mobile, Ala., 
where his address was Norwegian 
Chapell, is inquired for. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify his mother. Address, 22 Pile- 
stradet, Kristiania, Norway. — 12-22-15 

George Alexander Sharman, a na- 
tive of Brooklyn, N. Y. About 28 
years of age, height 5 feet 9 inches, 



supposed to have sailed on the Great 
Lakes in 1907, is inquired for by 
M. L. Kinvan, 1211 Mosher street, 
Baltimore, Md. 7-14-15 

George Barrett, who, on November 
12, 1912, left the ship "Port Logan" 
at Newcastle, of which he was an 
apprentice, is inquired for by his 
mother, his father having died. Any- 
one knowing the whereabouts of this 
lost son please at once communi- 
cate with Amelia Barrett, 1 Wood- 
land Place, East Greenwich, Lon- 
don, England. 3-3-15 



Carl Fritjof Johansson Lind, age 
39, a native of Sonderborg, Germany, 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify John Lind, 1401 West 9th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 3-24-15 

Anders C. Anderson, a native of 
Norway, who left his personal effects 
at Port San Luis, Cal., after leaving 
a ship at that place, is inquired for. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify D. R. Jacks, Deputy 
Collector of Customs, Port San Luis, 
Cal. 12-22-15 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July, 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St. 8-11-15 

Olai Ingcbrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Niels Ingcbrigtsen, 
469— 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 8-4-15 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Peter Murphy, better known as 
Boatswain McGann, will kindly notify 
Tatrick Kieran, 58 Commercial St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 4-19-16 

Vencelus Durbich is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please communicate with 
Gerolamo Durbich, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 7-28-15 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen' Journal 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The U. S. gunboat "Fox," which has been 
used by the Washington naval militia, has been 
condemned and ordered sold by the Navy 
Department. 

A sturgeon eight feet long and weighing 800 
pounds was caught during the past week in the 
Columbia River, near Clarkston, Wash. The big 
fish was kept on exhibition for several clays. 

The tug "Falcon" has been sold by Falcon 
Trawling and Towing Company to Garcia & 
Company of Acapulco for $8000. The vessel was 
purchased by Captain M. Oldenborg and F. J. 
Lindsay a few years ago for $800. 

Under the State Stockholders' Liability Law 
the U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals has held that 
a damage claim of $5000 held by Louis Buttner 
against the Pacific Shipping Company, now 
bankrupt, should be paid by the stockholders 
of the concern. Buttner was awarded the judg- 
ment for injuries incurred on one of the com- 
pany's ships in 1914. 

Steamship companies have been notified by 
Governor Goethals that the Government has 
all necessary wrecking gear and is prepared to 
undertake wrecking operations of any magnitude 
within the waters of the Canal Zone. In case of 
grounding or casualty necessitating wrecking 
operations within the canal all necessary equip- 
ment will be supplied and operations undertaken 
immediately for the floating or removal of the 
vessel in distress. The charges for the work will 
he actual cost plus 10 per cent. 

Captains of bay and river — and, for that mat- 
ter, deep sea — craft who entertain passengers, 
male or female, on the navigation bridge here- 
after will have to answer to United States In- 
spectors of Steamboats Guthrie' and Dolan. There 
is an ironclad law against any one but a licensed 
officer being on the bridge of a steamer under 
way, and it's being violated, according to the 
inspectors, who, in a circular letter issued to- 
day, called attention to the statute and threat- 
ened to bring charges against all masters vio- 
lating it. 

The steam schooner "Port Angeles," con- 
structed at the Kruse & Banks ship yards at 
North Bend, Oregon, for the Charles Nelson 
Company of San Francisco, slid into the water 
on September 26. The launching was hurried 
as the tide was earlier than expected, and the 
crowd which came later was disappointed in 
not being in season to witness the affair. Miss 
Edith Thomas christened the vessel. There was 
a large delegation of school children at the 
scene from Marsh field, viewing, many of them, 
their first launching. 

E. C. Ward will succeed J. C. Ford as vice- 
president and general manager of the Pacific 
Coast Company, holding corporation of the 
Pacific Coast Steamship Company. Ward also 
will be made president of the Pacific Coast 
Steamship Company. These changes have been 
decided upon by William H. Barnum, chairman 
of the board of directors of the Pacific Coast 
Company, who now is in San Francisco. The 
reorganization will take effect October 1. Ford 
probably will be made chairman of the board of 
the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. 

A profit of nearly $300,000 was made by the 
Hammond Lumber Company on the sale of the 
steamer "Edgar H. Vance" to Norwegian par- 
tics. The vessel was built at the Craig ship- 
yards in Long Beach in 1913 for a price ap- 
proximately $425,000. Henry Lund, who acted 
as purchasing agent for the Norwegian parties, 
paid the Hammond Company $725,000 for the 
steamer. The "Vance" is of 1523 tor-, net regis- 
ter, and is 291 feet long and 44 feet beam. She 
has been operated in the off-shore and coast- 
wise lumber trade by the Hammond Company. 
Rumors that the Hill liner "Minnesota" would 
be sold to the Japanese were set at rest during 
the week when C. W. Wiley, marine superin- 
tendent of the Great Northern Steamship Com- 
pany, announced that the vessel will soon sail 
from San Francisco for the United Kingdom 
witha cartro of general freight. The "Minne- 
sota," which has been here since last December 
repairing, will be under charter to Balfour, 
Guthrie & Co. The "Minnesota" has already 
made a trial trip to test the new boilers re- 
cently installed by the Union Tron Works. 

News of the destruction by fire in the upper 
waters of the Gulf of California of the auxiliary 
schooner "Panama," owned at Long Beach". 
Cal.. with the loss of all on board, including 
Captain Frank Paschall, his wife, Engineer 
Charles Leddick and three American seamen, 
was brought by Captain E. A. Blair of the 
schooner "Freda." He received his information 
at La Paz. The burned hulk was discover* rl 
by a Mexican fishing-boat between Tiburon 
Island and Santa Rosalia. According to Blair's 
information, the lire started from the explosion 
of the gasoline cooking stove, and all on hoard 
were drowned when the flames forced them to 
jump overboard. 

Three passenger liners and four cargo carriers. 
are to be acquired by the Maska Steamship 
Company, Seattle, according to announcement. 
Two of the new liners, 350 ft. long, fast tur- 
biners, during the summer will help from Seattle, 
southeastern and southwestern Alaska. The new ' 



liners will go on the route between Seattle and 
Philadelphia via the Panama Canal during the 
winter months, which will be inaugurated by the 
"Alaska," sailing from Seattle Nov. 22 and Feb. 
7 for Philadelphia via Panama Canal, Colon 
Kingston, Santiago de Cuba and Havana. A 
third passenger liner will replace the steamship 
"Dora" on the western Alaska route. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway Company has 
called for tenders for dredging in front of its 
wharves at Vancouver, B. C. The completion 
of this work will give a minimum depth of 30 
feet at low tide. This company is now making 
arrangements for the construction of an 850-foot 
pier, at an estimated cost of $1,250,000. It is 
expected that this pier will be one of the largest 
on the Pacific coast. A double-deck shed will 
be erected on the pier when completed. The 
company recently installed on its docks at Van- 
couver a 50-ton electrically operated derrick 
having a lifting reach of 80 feet, the former 
derrick having a maximum capacity of 15 tons. 
It is one of the latest and most approved type, 
equipped with all the modern devices for the 
efficient and quick handling of heavy loads, and 
costs between $25,000 and $30,000. 

The merger of the Pacific Coast Steamship 
Company and the Pacific Alaska Navigation 
Company, with a combined fleet of twenty- 
two large passenger and freight steamships said 
to be valued at $12,000,000, will go into effect 
November 1. This long looked for announce- 
ment was made in Seattle during the week, 
following ratification of the agreement at a 
meeting in New York of the directors of the 
Pacific Coast Company and at a meeting in 
Seattle of the Pacific Alaska directors. The 
new comany, which absorbs the other two, will 
he known as the Pacific Steamship Company. 
In making the announcement, Manager A. F. 
Haines of the Pacific Alaska Navigation Com- 
pany, gave out the following statement pre- 
pared by President H. F. Alexander: "The 
Pacific Steamship Company has been formed by 
the Pacific Coast Company and the Pacific- 
Alaska Navigation Company to operate along 
the entire Pacific Coast, including Alaska, with 
the further purpose of extending its service 
in other directions, and has made arrangements 
to operate all of the vessels of the Pacific 
Coast Company and the Pacific-Alaska Naviga- 
tion Company. 

A $1,000,000 shipbuilding and dry dock plant 
for San Diego is projected by a syndicate of 
eastern capitalists headed by the nine Vilsack 
brothers of Pittsburg. Work on the drydock 
and shipbuilding plant will start October 15 
ami will be completed within five months, ac- 
cording to Thos. C. Bond, promoter, who says 
that the dry dock will be of the floating tvpe 
and will cost $650,000 to construct. The ship- 
building plant, which will be operated in con- 
junction with the floating dry dock, will be 
used in building the hulls of vessels ranging 
from 200 to 2200 tons gross. Bond said that 
the company of which lie is the head already 
has been awarded a contract for building the 
hulls of six 2000-ton cargo carriers by George 
Culver of Los Angeles. These . vessels. Bond 
asserted, will be built of white cedar. The firm 
of Gray & Davis, of Bangor, Me., will furnish 
the machinery and other equipment for the 
shipbuilding plant. Bond says the new plant 
will construct wooden hulls only for the time 
being, as no steel is available now. The new 
yard will be a four-berth plant capable of turn- 
ing out annually eight wooden ships. Bond said 
that the company, of which he is the head, is 
incorporated in New Jersey. 

Outside interests are negotiating the purchase 
of the St. Johns Shipbuilding Company's prop- 
erty, to install a modern shipbuilding plant on 
the site for the construction of motorsliips and 
other vessels. The St. Johns Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, located at St. Johns, and now within the 
corporate limits of Portland, always has con- 
fined its operations to river boats. The site 
at St. Johns is regarded as ideal in its location 
for the building of dee]) water vessels. Tf the 
sale should he consummated this would make 
five shipbuilding plants established at Portland 
in less than that number of months. The other 
five consist of the Peninsula Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, the Stanifer-Clarkson Company, the Co- 
lumbia Engineering Works, the Northwesl Steel 
Company and Willamette Tron & Steel Works. 
In addition to these a company backed by F. A. 
Ballin and J. B. C. Lockwood has been or- 
ganized to engage in ship construction. The 
Heath Shipbuilding Company, formed by George 
E. llardv, is about readv to begin active opei i 
tions. Proposals from Norwegian firms for the 
building of wooden ships at Portland have 
been received. These are the first inquiries of 
the kind from abroad. 



F. K WALT,, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md WALTER LESCH, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY GUSTAV H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

41 Loyalls Lane 

NEWPORT, Va OSWALD RATHLEV, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. MOLLERSTADT, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 

206 Julia Street 

FORT ARTHUR, Tex WILLY MULLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Texas JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 
Broad. 
New York Branch, 514 Greenwich St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 228 Lafayette St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE. Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 164 Eleventh Ave. 
Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 181 Fulton St. 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 231 Dock St. 
NEW YORK CITY, 164 Eleventh Ave. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW York CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 202 Atlantio Ave. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 328-332 West Randolph St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, HI., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR. Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY. Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
Branches: 
;lo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



(Continued on Pajre 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILOR'S UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERQ Editor 

I. M. HOT.T Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE 

One year by mall - $2.00 | Six months *1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
Maritime Building, 59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

i ' "inmunicatlons from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the JOURNAL, provided they are of general 
interest, brief, legible, written on one side only of 
the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1916. 



EVIDENCE OE PROSPERITY? 



Evidence of the prosperity of the country is 
found in the fact that the importations of dia- 
- and other precious stones at the Port of 
New York fur the fiscal year ended June 30 
amounted to $44,887,826, which compares with 
$14,760,847 in 1915 and $33,183,735 in 1914. It is 
said the importations this past year were, with 
\ception, the largest in the history of the 
port. — New York Press item. 

Curious '"evidence," indeed! 

I f a man showed intelligence by wearing 
a plug hat ; if a woman showed superior 
mental qualities by importing- her gowns 
from Paris ; if broadcloth denoted gentle- 
manly attributes, and overalls the reverse, 
then perhaps we might concede that the in- 
creased importation of precious stones fur- 
nished evidence of the country's prosperity. 

.Men who submit such data as evidence 
forget that human beings as well as dia- 
monds have been imported and they pur- 
posely ignore the results of the most ex- 
haustive and sweeping official investigation 
of recent years, that of the Immigration 
Commission, which reported to Congress in 
1909. This investigation secured detailed 
information regarding the daily or weekly 
earnings of 619,595 employes of all classes 
in our basic manufacturing industries and 
in coal mining, and information regarding 
income and living conditions for 15,726 
families. 

It was found that the incomes of almost 
two-thirds of these families (64 per cent.) 
were less than $750 per year and of almost 
one-third (31 per cent.) were less than $500, 
the average for all being $721. The average 
size of these families was 5.6 members. 
Elaborate studies of the cost of living made 
in all parts of the country at the same time 
have shown that the very least that a family 
of live persons can live upon in anything 
approaching decency is $700. It is probable 
that, owing to the fact that the families in- 
\estigated by the Immigration Commission 
were, to a large extent, foreign born, the in- 
comes reported are lower than the average 
for the entire working population: neverthe- 
less, even when even- allowance is made for 
that fact, the figures show conclusively that 
between one-half and two-thirds of these 



families were living below the standards of 
decent subsistence, while about one-third 
were living in a state which can be described 
only as abject poverty. 

American society was founded and for a 
long period existed upon the theory that the 
family should derive its support from the 
earnings of the father. How far we have 
departed from this condition is shown by 
the fact that 79 per cent, of the fathers of 
families earned less than $700 per year. 
In brief, only one-fourth of these fathers 
could have supported their families on the 
barest subsistence level without the earnings 
of other members of the family or income 
from outside sources. 

Do these undisputed facts and figures show 
evidence of prosperity? Or have we reached 
a stage in the life of this Republic where 
prosperity is measured by the affluence of 
the few and the misery of the many? 



"CONCRETE SHIPS" 



A few weeks ago news came to hand 
from Norway of a strange craft that had 
put into Christiania. "A new type of ship," 
so ran the message from Norway's cap- 
ital, "has arrived here from the shipyards 
of the Christianiafjord. The ship, which 
resembles a huge barge, is constructed 
entirely of concrete, except for the ribs, 
which are steel, and is the first stone vessel 
ever floated." So is the long line of devel- 
opment in shipbuilding, stretching back to 
the hollowed trees of the stone age, pushed 
forward another step. 

A hundred years or so ago, when it first 
began to be propounded by shipbuilders 
here and there, men of greater daring than 
their fellows, that ships might be built 
entirely of iron, such ideas were received 
with something like an angry scorn by the 
great mass of contemporaries. Then, when 
scorn gave place to calm pronouncement, 
they said that "from its weight iron could 
not be expected to float, and was therefore 
unsuitable for the construction of a floating 
body." This was calculated to be final. 
The pioneer shipbuilder, however, went on 
with his work until one day, in the year 
1818, the lighter Vulcan, built entirely of 
iron, floated down the Monkland canal into 
the waters of the Clyde. Then came other 
objections. Iron ships that went ashore 
would suffer more than wooden shijis ; 
they could not be preserved from fouling 
by weeds and barnacles: finally, iron would 
affect the compass, making it untrust- 
worthy, if not useless. ( >ne by one. all 
these objections were proved either falla- 
cious or surmountable. Iron vessels cer- 
tainly floated; they proved themselves very 
much stronger than wooden vessels; the 
difficulty of fouling could be met by fre- 
quent cleaning and painting, and finally 
Sir G. B. Airy, after experimenting with 
the "Rainbow," at Deptford, and with the 
"Ironsides," at Liverpool, devised rules for 
the correction of errors in the compass 
caused by its metal surroundings. Thus, 
after a hard fight, iron, as a material for 
construction, struggled, first of all into the 
place of recognition, and thence to the place 
of being taken for granted. Since then 
changes of a vast, a revolutionary char- 
acter, have come in with ever less and less 
comment. 

Steel was introduced as a material for 
shipbuilding, under modern conditions, be- 
tween the years 1870 and 1875, and this 



time, an interested public received calmly 
enough such apparently anomalous and 
irresponsible statements as that the struc- 
ture of the steel ship had less weight 
than that of the wooden one. They were 
no longer, in fact, surprised to find that 
there was, after all, no difference in weight 
between a pound of lead and a pound of 
feathers, incredible as such a fact at one 
time seemed. And so it comes about that 
the ordinary layman in such matters reads 
the specifications of the armor of a modern 
war vessel with a calm and cheerful accept- 
ance. It is mildly interesting to him to 
know that its armor belt has a "maximum 
thickness of eleven inches, tapering to six 
inches at the forward and four inches at 
the after extremity of the vessel." He is 
glad to know that the "redoubt armor 
varies in thickness from eleven to eight 
inches"; that "the turrets and fore conning 
towers are eleven inches thick, and the 
after conning towers eight inches thick," 
and that "the protective deck varies from 
one and three-quarters to two and three- 
quarters inches in thickness." He is grate- 
ful for all such information. It is doubt- 
ful, of course, whether he realizes just 
what it all means, but at any rate it fills 
him with no wonder, much less with in- 
credulity. It all reminds one of a story 
told of an old farmer who, after many 
years' strict application to duty, once 
visited a traveling menagerie. He had 
never seen anything of the kind before, 
and as he went from one cage to another, 
his incredulity steadily deepened. At length 
he came to the hippopotamus. He gazed 
on its amorphous bulk in silence for a 
moment, and then, turning away, mur- 
mured irritably, "Nay! there never was 
such a critter." So it was at one time 
with men everywhere in regard to iron 
ships just as it is still of many other 
things. But the times are changing; men 
are coming to see that they have not 
dreamed in their philosophies of everything 
"in heaven and earth." And so, today, 
the "concrete ship" of Christiania is a 
subject for no more than a passing note, 
and for comment unamazed. 



Referring to recent doings in Congress, 
an eastern exchange says: "It would seem 
that Seattle and Prince Rupert should 
come to an amicable understanding in the 
matter of halibut." And yet all precedent 
seems to be against it. That is, while the 
United States and Canada manage to get 
on together with regard to almost every- 
thing else, the cod industry on one side of 
the continent and the halibut industry on 
the other are constant sources of dispute. 
This would not be the case if reciprocity, in 
its largest sense, existed between the two 
nations. There is even enough of cod and 
halibut for both. 



Wisconsin voters of all parties may well 
unite to re-elect Senator Ea Follette who 
has been triumphatnly renominated in spite 
of bitter opposition. In endorsing him 
Wisconsin Republicans have approved his 
unmatched efforts for "real" safety at sea. 
They have thereby upheld his vote for the 
Underwood tariff law, the eight-hour law 
and other progressive measures denounced 
by Mr. Hughes and his reactionary sup- 
porters. Ea Toilette's re-election in Nov- 
ember will imply repudiation of stand- 
patism in both parties. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



LIMITATION OF OUTPUT. 



Limitation of output is one of the crimes 
freely charged against the trade-unions. 
Practically no attention, however, is given 
the regular meetings of manufacturers and 
dealers in which they openly discuss and 
agree upon prices and the limitation of 
their product in order to maintain these 
prices. This applies to practically every 
great corporation. In some industries the 
producer will cut off the supply of the 
dealer if he sells the product cheaper than 
the price demanded. Meanwhile the same 
concern will insist on the workingman's 
right to sell his labor for whatever price 
he pleases. Every storekeeper despises the 
merchant who cuts his prices, but he will 
usually defend the workingman who cuts 
his. 

Trade-unions are also accused of limit- 
ing the number of apprentices in a partic- 
ular shop. The fact is, that the organized 
workers have been compelled to resort to 
this measure at times because some em- 
ployers have filled their shops with boys, 
who were frequently kept at work on a 
particular machine or on the same kind of 
special work, which enabled them to earn 
a man's wages in a year or two, thus not 
only depriving the full-fledged mechanic 
of his position, but, at the end of his ap- 
prenticeship, the young man found him- 
self a "specialist," unable to pursue his 
craft as a journeyman, therefore replaced 
by another boy, who would pass through 
the same experience. 

In the matter of piecework, when the 
employers found that by hard spurts their 
employes could earn a little more than 
was customary, it frequently happened that 
a reduction was ordered in the piecework 
price, so that soon this system in many 
trades became "the pace that kills." 

In practically every instance where the 
rules of the labor union seem unjust or 
tyrannical, the organized workers have been 
compelled, in self-defense, to establish such 
laws as would guarantee some protection 
against further encroachment by unscru- 
pulous employers. 

The extra five minutes at the end of the 
day in order to "finish a job," became a 
regular thing, and soon it lengthened into 
a quarter of an hour or longer, while fre- 
quently a protest brought only abuse. 
Hence, the apparently arbitrary ruling that 
under no circumstances must a man work 
beyond the time limit. 



THE ERICSSON MEMORIAL. 



The group of San Francisco labor skin- 
ners, who masquerade under the euphoni- 
ous title "law and order committee," met 
during the past week and "resoluted" for 
Candidate Hughes. American wage-earners 
who vote the Republican ticket because 
their grandfathers did it, will please take 
notice. Candidate Hughes and the local 
would-be union busters are soul mates in 
more than one sense of the term. They 
all want to protect the horny-handed sons 
of toil from the manipulations of the labor 
agitators. They are strong for the "pro- 
tective" tariff, too. In fact they believe in 
all kinds of protecton except such as is 
afforded to the worker by self-help, col- 
lective bargaining and the union shop. 



Congressman Foss Reviews the Life and Work 
of the Man Who Designed and Con- 
structed the "Monitor." 



Trade unionism, like Time, knows neither 
beginning nor end. It is the Genesis and 
Revelations of the human soul. 



John Ericsson was born on July 31, 1803, in 
Vermland, Sweden. He derived his mechanical 
bias, as Emerson would say, from his father, 
who was a miner, an educated man, a college 
graduate, and a fine mathematician. He de- 
rived his great, distinguishing characteristics, 
however, from his mother. She was a hand- 
some, intellectual woman of large sympathies, 
a great reader, and student of fiction, poetry 
and history. Young Ericsson received the best 
education that the means of his parents would 
permit, but his instruction was largely in tlie 
home. At an early age he secured a position 
as draftsman in the Gota Canal Co., and learned 
to draw maps, and later received lessons in 
architectural drawing. He studied Latin and 
French and mechanical drawing as well; but it 
was during his employment with the canal com- 
pany that his superior work attracted the at- 
tention of Count Platen, the great engineer of 
the canal which connects the Baltic Sea with 
the North Sea, who from that time on took a 
special interest in his career. In fact, it was 
through his friendship that he was appointed 
cadet in the mechanical corps of the Swedish 
navy. In 1817 he became a leveler on the 
canal; in 1820 he entered the Swedish army, at 
17 years of age, and went to Jemtland with his 
regiment, which it was ordered to survey. It 
was at this time that he conceived the idea of 
a flame engine, which he afterwards invented. 
Desiring a larger field for exploiting his inven- 
tion, he obtained a leave of absence from the 
army and went to England on May 18, 1826, 
but overstayed his leave, and was technically a 
deserter. However, through the intercession of 
his friend, the Crown Prince, he was later re- 
stored to the Swedish army, and received his 
commission as captain on October 3, 1827, when 
he resigned. 

He remained, however, in England and pur- 
sued his work with increasing energy and zeal. 
He made many applications of power, invented 
surface condensation and a steam fire engine. 
He made the first use of compressed air and 
artificial draft, but his greatest invention at this 
time was a locomotive named "Novelty," which 
competed on October IS, 1829, with Stephenson's 
famous "Rocket" for the prize of £500 offered 
by the Liverpool & Manchester Railroad and 
nearly won the prize. It made a mile in 56 sec- 
onds, but on the third trip the boiler, which had 
been hastily constructed, burst; but nevertheless 
he was highly praised for the genius of his 
construction. He also applied steam to canal 
navigation, and in 1835 designed a rotary pro- 
peller to be actuated by steam power. This 
propeller he applied to a number of boats. In 
1837 he designed an engine to impart motion to 
screw-propeller shafts; this was the first direct- 
acting screw-propeller engine ever built. ■ During 
the same year he constructed a boat and in- 
vited the lords of the British Admiralty to take 
an excursion. This vessel, named "Francis B. 
Ogden," after the American consul at Liverpool, 
made the trip at the rate of 10 miles an hour, 
but the British Admiralty gave him little en- 
couragement. 

It was at this time, through Ogden, that he 
met Capt. Stockton, of the American navy, who 
became much inerested in Ericsson's steam pro- 
peller, and ordered two of them for the Dela- 
ware & Raritan Canal in New Jersey, and on 
May 30, 1839, a steam schooner built by Erics- 
son and named after Capt. Stockton, 70 feet long 
and 10 feet wide, with a tonnage of 30 tons, ar- 
rived in New York after a 46 days' voyage, and 
was used as a towing vessel on the New Jersey 
canal for 30 years. 

Ericsson at this time, discouraged somewhat 
by his failure to break through the crust of Brit- 
ish Admiralty exclusiveness, and encouraged by 
his friends Ogden and Stockton to visit America. 
and with all his instincts, his heart, and his mind 
compelling him toward a larger field of activity, 
arrived in New York on the 23d of November, 
1839, and made that his home ever afterwards, 
and here it was, under the invigorating spirit of 
our institutions, in this free land of America, 
where, as the Irishman once said, "Every man 
is just as good as every other man and a little 
better, too," that John Ericsson found the full 
scope for his genius, his industry, and his pa- 
triotism. He introduced his propellers on all the 
inland waters of the United States, fitting: out 
merchant vessels on the canals and the Great 
Lakes. He was the father of the present steam 
merchant marine of the world. 

But his great work was yet to be done. In 
1842 he built the "Princeton," of 1000 tons dis- 
placement, the first screw steam war vessel ever 
built in any country. She was the first warship 
in which all her machinery was below the water 
line, out of reach of shot, and the first to be sup- 
plied with fan blowers for forcing the furnace 
fires. This vessel was received with great favor 
and was the wonder of the times. She carried 
Ericsson's wrought-iron gun, with which he ex- 
perimented upon iron targets and proved that 
4y$-inch armor could not withstand it. 

From this time on he was more or less en- 
gaged in assisting the Government. In 1854 he 
presented to Louis Napoleon the Third, of 
France, the plans and description of a war vessel 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 2, 1916. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping medium. Full Shipwreck Benefit 
was awarded to the remainder of the crew of 
the steamship "Congress." Donated one hundred 
dollars to the striking Culinary workers in this 
city. A Quarterly Finance Committee was 
elected to examine the accounts of the Union 
for the past three months. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 25, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 

REGINALD TOWNSEND, Agent. 
Room 11, De Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 

St. 

Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 25, 1916. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 25, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 25, 1916. 
Shipping dull. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 25, 1916. 
Shipping medium; prospects poor. 

H. CHRISTENSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 25, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 25, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping dull. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 25, 1916. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^4 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 18, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor; a number of 
members around the hall. 

TACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 28, 1916. 

The regular weekly meeting was called to 
order at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. 
Secretary reported shipping fair for waiters, 
medium for cooks. H. Pothoff was elected dele- 
gate to California State Federation of Labor 
convention to be held in Eureka October 2. 
The full Shipwreck Benefit was ordered paid to 
twenty-five members wrecked on the S. S. "Con- 
gress." The report of the Quarterly Finance 
Committee was read and adopted. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 21, 1916. 
No meeting; shipping medium. 

JOHN MEADE, Agent pro tern. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 20, 1916. 
No meeting; shipping slow, many members 
ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box No. 54. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 25, 1916. 
No meeting; shipping quiet; few men ashore; 
prospects poor. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
98 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 

DIED. 
Charles Lorenz Nelson, No. 861, a native of 
Sweden age 53, died at I Ion. .lulu, T. II.. Sept., 
1916. 

Christ Fredrick Xilsen, No. 1023, a native ol 
Denmark, age 30, died at Honolulu, T. H , Sep; . 
1916. 

Oscar Olson, No. 1246. a native of Si 

, 33 died at Fori Stanton, New Mexico, 

24, 1916. 
John J. Welure, No. 1064, a native of Norway, 
.if died on board the steamer "Lyman 

Stewart," Sept. 27, 1916. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



KELP AND THE FISHERIES. 
(By N. B. Scofield.) 



It has long been known that the kelp 
along the Pacific Coast contains a large per- 
centage of potash, and considerable experi- 
menting has been carried on to find meth- 
ods of gathering it and of extracting the 
potash and other commercially valuable by- 
products. 

Germany has hitherto furnished the bulk 
of our potash supply from the deposits in 
ancient lakes and seas. The United States 
Department of Agriculture, realizing the 
importance of having a source of supply 
within the United States and hoping to en- 
courage the greater use of potash as a fer- 
tilizer, started an investigation of our kelp 
beds and conducted experiments in extract- 
ing potash from kelp. The results of these 
investigations are to be found in Report 
No. 100 of the United States Department 
of Agriculture. 

It is believed by the Government officials 
who have investigated the kelp beds along 
the California Coast that there is enough 
kelp from Point Conception to the Mexican 
line to supply annually, without injury to 
the beds, all the potash used in the United 
States. The amount of potash consumed 
annually, before the great war cut off the 
German simply and raised prices, was 300,- 
000 tons and its value was approximately 
$15,000,000. 

Kelp is composed very largely of water 
(80 to 90 per cent.); to extract the potash 
profitably large quantities must be handled 
and a great outlay of capital is required. 
The rise in the price of potash occasioned 
by the war has induced several large com- 
panies to build plants at Long Beach and 
San Diego where kelp is now being har- 
vested. The companies operating are Swift 
& Company, the Hercules Powder Com- 
pany at San Diego, and the American Prod- 
ucts Company at Long Beach. Almost 
$3,000,000 has already been invested in 
Southern California in this industry. 

There has been considerable uncertainty 
as to the effect the cutting of kelp will have 
on the fisheries of the State. Many fear 
that the kelp beds will be destroyed and 
the protection which they now afford the 
beaches will be removed. This they think 
will greatly injure the clams which inhabit 
the beaches and the spiny lobsters which 
live more or less within the protection of 
the kelp. They also fear that the young- 
fish, especially the young barracuda, which 
arc in the habit of seeking a refuge in the 
kelp, will be deprived of this refuge and 
will leave that part of the coast. It is also 
believed by many that the kelp beds are 
extensively used as spawning places by 
many other commercial fish. It is thought 
that the removal of the kelp will, therefore, 
destroy these spawning beds. 

Captain Crandell, of the Scripps Institu- 
tion for Biological Research, at La Jolla, 
was employed by the Government in kelp 
investigations and is still engaged in watch- 
ing the effect of the cutting by the several 
large companies. He and others engaged 
in the work express the opinion that these 
companies are not likely, at least within the 
next few years, to devise kelp cutters or 
reapers which will cut the kelp more than 
six feet below the surface of the water, 
and that such small cuttings can have but 
little effect. It has been observed that, 
after one of these reapers has passed over 
a bed and cut the kelp to a depth of six 



feet, the uncut kelp branches rise to the 
surface and it is difficult to see where the 
cutter has been. Much of the kelp, espe- 
cially along the edges of the beds, can not 
be touched and this continues to afford 
protection to the beaches. It has been 
pointed out that great masses of kelp are 
more easily detached from their "hold- 
fasts" by violent storms than are smaller 
beds, and it is believed that where beds 
have been subjected to cutting they will 
not be' so easily washed out by storms. 
Furthermore, the kelp, though cut six feet 
below the surface, will continue to serve as 
a refuge for fish. 

The species of kelp which is being har- 
vested in California is the Macrocystis py- 
rifera. This grows in long strands from 
one to three hundred feet in length which 
are held to the rocky bottom by means of 
a "hold fast." The leaves float out on the 
surface of the water and are held suspended 
by floats containing air spaces. The plants 
reproduce by spores which lodge on the 
bottom and start new plants ; and by stool- 
ing or sending off branches from near the 
hold-fast. If the top end of a plant is cut 
off, the rest of that particular plant ceases 
to grow, but the shorter branches, which 
are continually arising from the base, soon 
grow up and take its place. Experiments 
are now being conducted at La Jolla for 
the purpose of determining the rate of 
growth of these plants, and it is believed 
that the cutting of the kelp near the sur- 
face will tend to make them stool, so that 
rowth will be increased by the cutting. 

It is to the advantage of the companies 
engaged in cutting the kelp to avoid des- 
troying the beds, and to cut them only as 
fast as they will reproduce themselves. 

It is believed by Government experts 
that, even if the entire potash supply of the 
United States were to be derived from kelp, 
none of the beds would be injured, unless 
possibly some bed that is favorably located 
close to the harbor where several compa- 
nies are at work. 

The regulation of the kelp industry in 
California will come entirely under the ju- 
risdiction of the State, for the beds are all 
within the three-mile limit. It is the desire 
of the Federal Government that the State 
devise and pass such laws as will protect 
this potash supply and at the same time 
assure the companies operating of a con- 
tinuous supply of kelp and protect them 
from the interference of "pirates." It will 
therefore be necessary to enact laws under 
which kelp beds may be leased or appor- 
tioned to operating companies under regu- 
lations which will assure continuous crops. 

The administration of the kelp resources 
falls to the Fish and Came Commission. 
\'o State laws have as yet been passed 
in this regard, but several counties have 
d ordinances intended to protect the 
kelp beds. These ordinances have been 
1 tht' nigh fear that the kelp beds will 
be destroyed and bathing beaches and the 
fishing industry ruined. It is probable that 
county ordinances arc unconstitu- 
tional. 

Experts from the Scripps Institution in 
the employ of the Government are contin- 
uing their investigation of the kelp-cutting 
industry and are watching results carefully. 
The Fish and Came Commission is also 
keeping in close touch with the progress of 
the industry with a view toward proposing 
laws which will conserve this resource upon 



which one of the greatest industries of the 
State will probably be based — an industry 
which may yield more profit than all of the 
fisheries combined. 



AMERICAN PROTECTORATES? 



The establishment of a United States 
naval station in Fonseca Bay, in accordance 
with the provisions of the treaty entered 
into recently, it appears, between that 
country and Nicaragua, is not to be accom- 
plished without protest from Salvador and 
Honduras, which republics allege that Nic- 
aragua, in this transaction, threw into the 
bargain something that did not wholly 
belong to her. That the protest may not 
take a too serious character the Washing- 
ton government has dispatched two war- 
ships to Xicaraguan waters. Incidentally, 
these vessels and the marines they carry 
will undertake to preserve order in Nica- 
ragua, when the national election is to be 
held, and when it is thought that the mal- 
contents in the country may attempt to 
overthrow President Diaz. All of this 
points directly to the possibility that, for 
political, economic and moral reasons, the 
United States may be forced to extend to 
the three countries named, and eventually 
to their immediate neighbors, the system 
that appears to be working satisfactorilv in 
Santo Domingo and in Haiti.— Christian 
Science Monitor. 



STRIKES AND WAR. 



The strikes and threats of strikes in our 
little island since the war began are the 
most glorious manifestation of British vir- 
ility and passion for freedom that the world 
ver seen. What would be the use 
of conquering the Prussian king if we al- 
lowed the same kind of spider here at 
home to ensnare and strangle us? 

For many months we have been fighting 
enemies here as well as in France, Flan- 
ders, and on the sea. Our private profit- 
mongering manufacturers are the British 
allies of the Prussian Junker class; worse 
than German spies in our midst, hypocrites 
and vipers, glutting themselves on gold, yet 
expecting the miners, like cowed slaves, to 
stand by without claiming any sort of 
bonus equal to the increased cost of living 
and the masters' enormous profits. 

The attitude which the Welsh miners 
h ve taken against the mine owners is the 
finest bit of patriotism that the British peo- 
ple have yet displayed. It is a sign that 
when the war is over no power on earth 
can make slaves of us. 

And the news of the strike at Essen 
seems to indicate that the Social Demo- 
crats of Germany will live to see another 
day — a day when there will be no Kaiser. 

Let the employing class take warning of 
the strike in Wales that, if the British and 
our Allies win, the gains of victory will be 
to man, not to master. 

If the Germans win, the Social Democ- 
racy of the Yaterland will conquer the con- 
querors. They laugh best who laugh last. 
At the end of the war the proletariats all 
over Europe will laugh the laugh of victory 
and of innocence." — "The Ethical World," 
London. 



The hand that fakes the cable fools the 
world. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



PROGRESS OF 1916. 



All of the ninety-two labor laws passed 
by Congress and by State legislatures dur- 
ing 1916, have just been summarized by 
the American Association for Labor Legis- 
lation. "Of special significance in the labor 
legislation of this year," says the Secretary, 
Dr. John B. Andrews, "were two national 
laws, one prohibiting the shipment in in- 
terstate or foreign commerce of certain 
products in the preparation of which the 
labor of children under designated condi- 
tions has been employed, and the other 
providing a model scale of workmen's 
compensation for personal injuries among 
Federal employes of which there are now 
more than 480,000. Several hundred labor 
bills were introduced this year in Congress 
alone, while eleven State legislatures, in 
spite of the "reaction" ground out their 
full share of the annual grist. 
Trade Disputes. 
Three States — Maryland, Massachusetts 
and South Carolina — concerned themselves 
with the legal regulation of collective bar- 
gaining. In Maryland a State board is 
authorized to prescribe rules of procedure 
for arbitration of industrial disputes in- 
cluding power to conduct investigations 
and hold hearings, to summon witnesses 
and enforce their attendance, to require 
the production of books, documents and 
papers, and administer oaths, exercising 
these powers to the "same extent that 
such powers are possessed by the civil 
courts of the State." South Carolina cre- 
ated a board of three members to investi- 
gate and to promote agreements in strikes 
and lockouts at the rate of $10 per day 
each. Massachusetts amended her law 
regulating the procuring of strikebreakers. 
Hours. 
Following the limitation of working 
hours on public work to eight a day in the 
majority of the States, Massachusetts this 
year provides for her public employes the 
further limitation of the forty-eight hour 
week. In private employment several 
States place additional safeguards around 
the employment of women and children 
during the Christmas shopping season, and 
Massachusetts is to investigate the possi- 
bilities of one day of rest in seven for 
employes in hotels and restaurants. 
Safety and Health. 
During the year seven of the eleven 
States holding regular legislative sessions 
passed new or strengthened old laws af- 
fecting child labor. Shorter hours, a higher 
minimum age, prohibition of night work 
and exclusion from hazardous employments 
arc the main tendencies. South Carolina 
raises the minimum work age from twelve 
to fourteen, while Massachusetts and New 
Jersey make special provision that pupils 
who study part-time in vocational schools 
may then work part time. 

Impelled by recent accidents New Jersey 
has joined the list of States requiriiTg 
passenger elevators to have interlocking 
device automatically preventing movemenl 
of elevator car until shaft door is closed 
and securely fastened. 

Unemployment. 
Legislation authorizing public employ- 
ment bureaus in Maryland, the regulation 
of private agencies in Virginia, and the 
creation of a bureau of farm settlement for 
immigrants in New York, is supplemented 



by the California legislature's endorsement 
of the United States Department of Labor 
recommendation "that the public land 
tenure be so regulated as to insure the 
settler the entire product of his labor." 
Social Insurance. 

South Carolina and Virginia patched up 
their employers' liability laws, while Ken- 
tucky enacted the most progressive work- 
men's compensation law in any Southern 
State. Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, 
New Jersey and New York strengthened 
their compensation laws without, however, 
equaling the new national law for injured 
Federal employes, which is termed "the 
most scientific and most liberal workmen's 
compensation law in the world." Mary- 
land enacted a mother's pension law and 
Massachusetts created a commission on 
social insurance to study sickness, unem- 
ployment and old age and to recommend 
insurance legislation next January. 
Factory Inspection. 

The reorganization and unification of the 
administration of labor laws continues, the 
most noteworthy changes this year being 
in Maryland and New Jersey where steps 
were taken toward consolidation of factory 
inspection and workmen's compensation 
administration. 



SAVING THE "CONSTITUTION." 



The appeal to Congress to provide funds 
for rehabilitation of "Old Ironsides," the 
frigate of the United States Navy known 
as the "Constitution," which in the war of 
1812 with Great Britain had a brilliant rec- 
ord of victories, has a fair prospect of be- 
ing heard because of the prior popular up- 
rising in behalf of the ship. Eighteen years 
after she had won the right always to be 
cared for, it was proposed by a Secretary of 
the Navy that she be dismantled and sold. 
Then a poet came to her defense, and, in 
so doing, passed from being a local' writer 
of "occasional verse" to the rank of a na- 
tion's voice. Oliver Wendell Holmes, by 
his poem "Old Ironsides," saved the craft 
from the iconoclast; and, in succession, she 
became a school ship, a receiving ship and 
latterly "an antique," visited by the curi- 
ous sightseer in the Boston Navy Yard. 

Interest in the "Constitution" should be 
keener now than it often has been because 
the act of Congress of 1794 that called for 
the construction of frigates was due in 
part to the difficulties that vessels and 
crews of the United States sailing in the 
Mediterranean were having with Algerian 
pirates. Diplomacy and bribery bringing 
Algeria to terms, Congress cut down the 
proposed new riavy to three vessels, one of 
them the "Constitution." The vessels were 
built by appropriations that made the cost 
of each less than $200,000. But timber was 
plentiful and cheap then and labor inex- 
pensive, and Joshua Humphreys of Pennsyl- 
vania was a genius in ship designing, as the 
speed and stanchness of the frigates showed 
once they got to sea. 



The importance of the demand for "recog- 
nition of the union" may be very well judged 
by the amount of opposition it encounters 
from the employing class. 



After all, it frequently happens that what 
we call progress denotes nothing more than 
that we have stopped short of positive ret- 
rogression. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TON A WAND A, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 406 N. Clark Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y TO Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 365. 

BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELEF STATIONS: 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Minitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Wis. S.iKinaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Ludington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie. Ml. h. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

r^rie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



speech, free press and assemblage neces- 
sary to liberty. It was drafted by repre- 
sentatives of the American Federation of 
Labor, after a great deal of careful thought 
and study." 

< )n this special committee are repre- 
sentatives of trade unions, railroad brother- 
hoods and the Farmer's Educational and 
Co-operative Union. 



Discovers a Labor "Solution." 

John 11. Wallace. Jr., Alabama State 
Came and Fish Commissioner, has dis- 
covered a system whereby strikes and 
lockouts will no longer distract this nation. 
His plan is simple — appoint an arbitration 
hoard to adjust wages, make it illegal to 
strike while the hoard is reviewing the 
case and depend upon public opinion to 
enforce the award. 

y\r. Wallace averred in a Labor Day 
speech : 

"The weight of public opinion would un- 
doubtedly sustain (he board of arbitration, 
therefore strikes and lockouts, upon the 
adoption of the recommendation 1 have 
suggested, would become a thing of the 
past." 

This anceint scheme of tying men to 
their jobs w; 1 on Colorado by the 

last Legislature, but at the recent conven- 
tion of the State Federation of Labor was 
roundly denounced. 

Despite this latest repudiation of com- 
pulsion, men still ignore the verdict of his- 
tory and present the system as some new 
discovery. 



Health Comes First. 

The United States Public Health Ser- 
vice, in a bulletin just issued, asks: 

"What profiteth a man that he gain the 
whole world yet lose his health?" 

Attention is called to the increasing 
death rate of persons over 45 years of age 
because of the lack of health-giving exer- 
cise, superfluity of diet, lack of restoring 
sleep, over-stimulation, the high pressure 
of the race for power, wealth and position, 
plus physical neglect, all of which bring 
early decay. It is slated that the man who 
leads the well-balanced life lasts the long- 
est — he who neither overworks nor over- 
plays. The regulations of the public health 
service si 

"It is the duty of officers to maintain 
their physical as well as their professional 
fitness. To this end they shall be allowed 
linn- for recreation and study whenever 
their official duties will permit." 

"If the government regards it as essen- 
tial that its sanitary experts shall be safe- 
guarded in this way, is it not equally im- 
portant to every citizen that he similarly 
maintain a high standard of physical in- 
tegrity?" inquires the bulletin. 



THE ERICSSON MEMORIAL. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



The real advantage which truth has 
consists in this, that when an opinion is 
true it may be extinguished once, twice, 
or many times, but in the course of ages 
there will generally be found persons to 
rediscover it, until some one of its re- 
appearances falls on a time when from 
favorable circumstances it escapes persecu- 
tion until it has made such a head as to 
withstand all subsequent attempts to sup- 
SS it. — John Stuart Mill. 



which we declined, but seven years afterwards 
he made available in the construction of the cele- 
brated "Monitor"; and this brings me to the 
greatest work of his lifetime, which was the in- 
vention and construction of that ironclad. 

After Fort Sumter had been fired upon in 1861 
and the war had broken out, Ericsson addressed 
a letter to President Lincoln stating that, as the 
inventor of the present system of naval propul- 
sion and the constructor of the first screw ship 
of war, he now offered to construct a vessel for 
the destruction of the Confederate fleet at Nor- 
folk and for scouring the southern rivers and in- 
lets of all craft protected by Confederate bat- 
teries. The naval board appointed for the con- 
sideration of warships, after full deliberation, 
finally recommended the adoption of the Erics- 
son floating battery, but not without some mis- 
givings as to its cruising ability. However, the 
contract for the construction of the ironclad 
gunboat was agreed upon on October 4, 1861, 
and work was commenced the day the contract 
was signed. Her keel was laid on October 25, 
she was launched on January 30, completed on 
February 15, turned over to the Government on 
February 19, and put in commission in command 
of Lieut. Worden on February 25, and on 
March 4 was favorably reported on by a board 
of naval officers, a remarkable record for speedy 
construction of a war vessel which was destined 
to revolutionize the navies of the world. 

The vessel was designed in all its parts by 
Ericsson, and in a letter which he wrote he 
said that "the entire labor of preparing the 
original working plans was performed by him- 
self, every line being drawn by my own hands." 
She contained at least 40 patentable contrivances, 
marvels of ingenuity and skill. She was a ves- 
sel 172 feet long, 41 feet 6 inches wide, and had 
a tonnage of 776 tons, and drew about 10J/2 feet 
of water. Her armament was two 11-inch Dahl- 
gren guns in an iron turret 8 inches thick, hav- 
ing an inside diameter of 20 feet. An eminent 
authority on naval architecture has declared that 
the "Monitor" was a "creation altogether orig- 
inal, peculiarly American, admirably adapted to 
the special purpose which gave it birth." 

When the Civil War broke out the Federal 
Government abandoned the navy yard at Nor- 
folk and sank some of its vessels there, inclu- 
ding the "Merrimac," a fine frigate of 3500 tons, 
nearly five times the tonnage of the "Monitor," 
which the Confederates, afterwards taking pos- 
session of the yard, raised and converted into an 
ironclad vessel. They cut her decks down to 
within 3j/£ feet of her light water line and 
roofed over her midsection for 170 feet with 
pitch pine and oak 2 feet thick, extending from 
the water line to a height over her gun deck of 
7 feet, where the two sides joined at an angle 
of about 45 degrees. The ends were covered 
over, thus making a shed. Her sides were plated 
with iron A l / 2 inches thick, which was bolted to 
the woodwork. She was provided with a cast- 
iron ram, which projected about 4 feet. This 
vessel was 280 feet long, breadth 57 feet, and 
her draft in water 24 feet. Her armament con- 
sisted of two 7-inch guns at the bow and stern 
and two 6-inch guns and six 9-inch guns on her 
sides, 10 in all. Such were the two vessels which 
were to meet in awful combat. 

On Saturday, the 8th of March 1862, the "Mer- 
rimac," under command of Capt. Buchanan, with 
300 men on board, left the Norfolk Navy Yard 
a little before noon, steamed into Hampton 
Roads, and began her attack upon the Union 
fleet, which consisted of the "Cumberland," 
"Congress," "Minnesota," "Roanoke," and "St. 
Lawrence," the flower of the Union navy, all 
wooden ships and all unarmored. She was at- 
tended by several gunboats. She fired upon the 
"Cumberland," and her fire was returned by the 
Federal fleet, but did no damage, as the shots 
glanced from her sloping iron sides. She 
steamed down past the "Congress" and then 
turned around and made for the "Cumberland" 
and rammed that vessel, breaking a great hole 
in her side, so that 40 minutes afterwards she 
went down with the American flag flying at 
her peak and her guns still firing. This collis- 
sion tore the ram off the bow of the "Merrimac." 
Then she made for the "Congress" and ran her 
ashore, firing into her with such tremendous 
effect that the "Congress" hoisted her white flag 
as a token of surrender, and then scattered the 
other boats into the shoals and left, on account 
of the approaching darkness, for Norfolk Navy 
Yard. 

The effect of this terrible defeat of the Union 
navy, in which her finest ships were crippled, 
was a tremendous blow to the North and cre- 
ated tremendous consternation in Washington, 
which city would naturally be the objective point 
of the enemy. A great army was at that time 
being amassed in Virginia, and the "Merrimac's" 
victory, according to the commanding general, 
was likely to change the whole plan of cam- 
paign just on the eve of execution. On the fol- 
\ lowing day President Lincoln convened a special 
Cabinet meeting, at which the Secretary of 
War, Mr. Stanton, expressed the general feeling 
of the hour in these words: 

"The 'Merrimac' will change the whole course 
of the war; she will destroy seriatim every naval 
vessel; she will lay all the cities on the sea- 
board under contribution. I shall immediately 
recall Burnside; Fort Royal must be abandoned. 



I will notify the governors and municipal au- 
thorities in the North to take instant measures 
to protect their harbors. I have no doubt but 
that the enemy is this minute on her way to 
Washington, and it is not unlikely that we shall 
have a shell or a cannon ball from one of her 
guns into the White House before we leave 
the room." 

Lincoln himself was much cast down. 

On the other hand, the South was wild with 
exultation over the victory. Great crowds 
flocked to every station along the railroads to 
get the latest news. The hopes of the Confed- 
erates rose to the highest pitch. 

On the following morning the victorious 
"Merrimac," after being overhauled at the navy 
yard, returned to the fray to destroy the rest 
of the Union ships. She made for the "Minne- 
sota," which was lying helpless upon the shoals, 
when lo! behold, the little "Monitor," which the 
night before had come down through a stormy 
sea with a crew of 57 officers and men under the 
command of Lieut. Worden and had anchored 
at the "Minnesota's" side, unexpectedly steamed 
out and without apology made for the "Merri- 
mac." The "Merrimac" opened the battle with 
the firing of her 7-inch gun, and the "Monitor" 
replied with her two 11-inch. The battle raged 
furiously for hours between the ironclads, with 
the shots of each having but little effect upon 
the other, when suddenly the "Merrimac" with- 
drew from the scene of battle. Neither vessel 
inflicted any serious damage upon the other, al- 
though both smokestacks and the muzzle of two 
of the guns of the "Merrimac" were shot away. 
Each side claimed the victory, and while it may 
be regarded as a drawn battle, yet, nevertheless, 
the "Monitor" remained the undisputed mistress 
of the sea, as the "Merrimac" never returned to 
finish the fight. 

The North, which but a day before was 
wrapped in gloom and despondency, now broke 
out in joyful acclaim. John Ericsson, the de- 
signer, the inventor, and constructor of the 
"Monitor," was the hero of the hour. Resolu- 
tions from chambers of commerce and boards 
of trade and State legislatures showered in upon 
him. The Congress of the United States pre- 
sented him with a vote of thanks for the great 
service which he had rendered the country, and 
made public acknowldgcmcnt "for his enter- 
prise, skill, energy and forecast displayed by 
him in the construction of his ironclad, the 
'Monitor,' which under gallant and able man- 
agement came so opportunely to the rescue of 
our fleet in Hampton Roads and resisted the 
work of destruction then being successfully 
prosecuted by the enemy with her ironclads, 
seemingly irresistible by any other power at our 
command." 

But throughout the festivities of that hour 
John Ericsson bore himself with the modesty 
and mien of a true patriot, and when in after 
years it was proposed to give him some finan- 
cial recognition for his services he gave expres- 
sion to the noble spirit of unselfish devotion to 
his country when he said: "I have not received 
any remuneration from the Nation for the 
'Monitor,' nor did I patent the invention, as 1 
intended it as a contribution to the glorious 
cause of the Union." 

This contest between the ironclads revolution- 
ized the naval architecture of the world. The 
battle of March 8 between the "Merrimac" and 
the Union fleet demonstrated that wooden ships 
could not stand up against ironclads, and the 
battle of March 9, the day we celebrate, between 
the "Monitor" and the "Merrimac" demonstrated 
that the little ironclad, with its single turret 
and superior guns, could hold its own against 
its greater antagonist. At that time began the 
race between armor and projectiles. 

The Battle of Hampton Roads created a 
sensation in every nation of the world. Every 
shipyard stopped and took notice of the great 
lesson drawn from this naval conflict, and im- 
mediately started to profit by it. The London 
Times of that day said: 

"Where, as we had available for immediate 
purposes 149 first-class warships, we have now 
two. these two being the 'Warrior' and her 
sister. 'Ironsides'; there is now a ship in 
the English Navy apart from these two that it 
would not be madness to trust to an engagement 
with the little 'Monitor.'" 

The "cheese box of Ericsson" became the 
prototype of the great battleship of to-day, 
which is but a duplication or multiplication of 
turrets on a high freeboard. The fighting ships 
of all the navies of the world bear upon them 
to-day the evidence of the overmastering genius 
of the greatest engineer of this time. 

John Ericsson afterwards contributed much to 
the cause of science and engineering, and gave 
the benefit of his services oftentimes to his 
native country and was crowned with many 
honors by foreign nations. He closed his use- 
ful and honorable career at the age of 86 years, 
on the 8th day of March, 1889, on the twenty- 
seventh anniversary of the "Merrimac's" victory, 
which his indomitable skill transformed on the 
following day into a glorious Union triumph. 
Sixteen months later the United States cruiser 
"Baltimore," under the command of Captain 
Schley, bore his remains to the land of his birth, 
where he sleeps among the beautiful hills of 
Ycrmland, in the land of legend, of romance, of 
poetry, and of song. 

John Ericsson was the greatest contribution 
ever .tjiven by the Swedish nation to the United 
States of America. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



AN AMBITION. 



I do not want an inglenook 

With room for two or four 
While hundreds of my fellowmen 

Walk homeless by my door. 

T do not want four sheltering walls 
Enriched with treasurers rare, 

While any human kin of mine 
Exists in hovels bare. 

I do not want a glittering board 
With priceless dainties spread 

While hundreds of our children cry 
In lifeless tones for bread. 

No, may I never draw apart 

In self complacency, 
Forgetful of a world that needs 

The mind and heart of me. 

My Inglenook shall be the world, 

To help mankind my art, 
And at the board of human love 

Heart hunger will depart. 

— A Comrade, in "The People's College 
News." 



GERMAN LABOR AND THE WAR. 



The Federation of German Labor Unions 
recently met in Berlin for its nineteenth 
conference. After the agenda submitted 
had been approved, a delegate moved that 
in view of what had taken place within the 
ranks of the Social Democratic party, the 
following question should be discussed in 
private : What lessons with regard to agi- 
tation and organization have the German 
Labor unions to draw from the war? The 
resolution was adopted, and the meeting 
passed to the discussion of women's work 
during and after the war, a matter that 
occupied the whole of the first day's pro- 
ceedings. 

Herr Hartmann, the president, intro- 
duced the subject in a long speech on the 
industrial employment of women. Women 
were at work today, he said, in every 
branch of industry, even in those for which 
they had not previously been considered 
suitable, such as iron works, collieries, 
machine factories and foundries. In the 
Dortmund district, for instance, where 
there were no women before the war, there 
were now 7500, 6000 of whom were em- 
ployed in the iron industry. With regard 
to working hours, the maximum fixed for 
women workers before the war was 10 
hours daily, but that provision had been 
suspended, and numbers of women in the 
collieries were now working 12 hours, 
while in 16 iron works in Upper Silesia 16 
hours were demanded of them, and soldiers' 
wives were being employed, at their own 
request, on night shifts so as to be able 
to attend to their household duties in the 
daytime. These conditions, Herr Hart- 
mann insisted, amounted to a mere ex- 
ploitation of female labor, and were by no 
means necessary even in war time. It 
would be quite possible even now to fix the 
maximum working day at 8 or 10 hours 
at the most, especially as labor exchange 
figures showed that plenty of women were 
available. 

With regard to the question as to whether 
women's labor was equal to that of men, 
he continued, the answer must certainly 
be in the affirmative, insofar as work with 
machines was concerned, but although that 
was so, women's wages remained far below 
those of men. In upper Silesia they were 
from 20 to 40 per cent, lower, and the 



average ratio altogether was 1 to 3. The 
military authorities had intervened with 
regard to wages paid for work done at 
home, and there was no reason why they 
should not have done so in the case of 
factory workers as well. As to the prob- 
lem of what was to happen to the working 
women after the war, Herr Hartmann in- 
sisted that matters could not and must not 
remain as they were. If the female worker 
was to be retained, definite guarantees must 
be secured that she would not be used as a 
means of lowering wages, and that she 
would be better protected than formerly 
by prohibitions against her employment in 
perilous callings, the regulation of working 
hours, the care of children in the form of 
creches, and the increased employment of 
women as factory inspectors. 

These demands were embodied in a resolu- 
tion that was adopted by the meeting, to- 
gether with another founded on a report on 
the work done by women at home made by 
Fraulein Dr. Gobel. As far as wages were 
concerned, the speaker explained, there had 
not been a deterioration of conditions, as the 
military authorities had fixed the price to be 
paid for that kind of work. But that pro- 
tection would disappear with the war, while 
at the same time the labor market would 
again be flooded. The situation would be 
greatly relieved if the working hours in 
factories were reduced, as the employment of 
more hands would then become necessary, 
while the threatened prevalence of unem- 
ployment could also be obviated by the or- 
ganized distribution of public orders, such as 
those for the army, after consultation with 
employers and work people in the different 
industries concerned. 



DEMOCRACY. 



Democracy is the passionate movement 
of a people toward power in every social 
endeavor. And it is the presence of this 
passion in a people, not their form of gov- 
ernment, that determines their part in the 
future renovation of the world. Indeed, no 
word in the language has so enlarged its 
circle as has this word democracy. Faster 
than we have been able to follow it, the 
commotion has spread to the very bounds 
of life. State, church, school, industry, the 
relations of man to man — all these are 
being jostled by this new unifying force. 
It is this sudden crowding of institutions 
upon the soul of man and their demand for 
new interpretation and reshaping that has 
set the ground to trembling beneath our 
feet, and has startled us into consciousness 
that the hour for great things has come. 
Democracy, the power of the people — that 
is the tocsin of the new age. — Schoon- 
maker in "The World-Storm and Beyond. " 



LINCOLN ON LABOR. 



It is assumed that labor is available only 
in connection with capital ; that nobody la- 
bors unless somebody else, having capital, 
somehow by the use of it induces him to 
labor. . . . Now, there is no such rela- 
tion between capital and labor as assumed. 

. . Labor is prior to and independent 
of capital. Capital is only the fruit of la- 
bor, could never have existed if labor had 
not first existed. — Abraham Lincoln. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where thy have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



(Continued from Page 5.) 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C, 1424 Government St. 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 213 Hastings St., E. corner of 
Hastings and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2216 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 



875 



PORTLAND. Ore.. 242 Flanders St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



Smoke only blue-labeled cigars! 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Room No. 203, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 214. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 98 Second St. N. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42- 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 
PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada, 437 Gore Ave. 
PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada, P. O. Box 968. 

UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 1 38. 

TAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 10 East St. 
SM'RAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



Eureha, Cal. 



The Cigar-makers' Union of Cin- 
cinnati is conducting an organizing 
campaign among girls employed in 
this industry. President Pcrkin- of 
the International union has appointed 
a special organizer for this work. 

Northern Pacific railroad teleg- 
raphers have been awarded wage in- 
shorter hours and improved 
working conditions. A strike is no 
longer threatened. The new schedule 
me effective October 1 and af- 
500 men. 
The United States Department of 
• r is planning to establish labor 
employment bureaus in all principal 
cities of Texas at once, A. Cami- 
netti, chief of the Immigration De- 
partment of Labor, announced on a 
nt \isit to Ft. Worth, says a 
News special. 

Officers of the Riggers and Wreck- 
ers' Union at Cincinnati have sued 
ral firms for $50,000 damages be- 
e of assaults that resulted al- 
fatally. These unionists are 
striking to enforce a nine-hour work 
day and 30 cents an hour. Former 
; cents for a ten-hour 
day. 

The Denver & Interurban Railroad 
pany was found guilty of violat- 
ing the Federal Hours-of-Service law 
for railroad men by the federal court 
aled the decision on the 
.nd that the law does not apply 
to intrastate lines. The company 
1 a train dispatcher to work- 
excessive hours. 

Machinists employed in Dayton, 
Ohio, factories have suspended work 
to enforce an eight-hour day. Prac- 
tically every machine shop in the 
city is tied up. The strikers were 
refused a hall to hold their first 
meeting and 5000 machinists and 
sympathizers listened to stirring ad- 
dresses while standing on the flat 
lands abmg the river bottom. 

\> a part of its campaign for the 
non-union shop the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce has been cir- 
culating petitions to amend the city 
ter so police judges shall be 
inted by the mayor instead of 
d. Th« Labor Council opposes 
this move and declares that the 
municipal judicial machinery should 
permitted to remain in direct 
control of the people. 

Several hundred employes of the 
Eagle Silk Company at Shamokin, 
Pa., are on strike to enforce living 
ditions. It is stated that wages 
300 per cent, lower than in sinii- 
lar Factories in other localities and 
that weavers have been forced to 
work a week of 78 hours for $10. 
Child labor and other labor laws are 
violated by the company. The Uni- 
ted Textile Workers' L T nion is assist- 
ing these strikers. 

Coal miners in southern Colorado 
ng the United Mine Work- 
ers' Union and the civil war pre- 
• cipitated by the coal operators in this 
section has been in vain. Unions 
havi ^lied in a score of 

mining camps with a 100 per cent. 
membership, and the workers call at- 
tention to the fact that they are not 
molested by company officials and 
the union notices posted around the 
mines no longer mysteriously disap- 
pear. The claim that the Rockefeller 
"union" is valueless has brought re- 
sults, as the Colorado Fuel & Iron 
pany has raised wages of its 
miners 5 per cent. The employes 
believe, however, that the wave of 
1 ona fide trade unionism is responsi- 
ble for this increase. 



Office Phone 
Elliott 1196 



MARSHALL'S 



Residence 
North 3445 



NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

Compasses Adjusted 

301-2 P. I. BUILDING, Next to Post Office 

Established 1890 SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, .WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 
1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St 
Seattle, Wash, 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

t'nder a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postoffice, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail forwarded 
iluiing that period, they should notify 
ttie Agent to hold mail until arrived. 

Ackerson, A. R Laamanen, J. 

Andersen, A. -1821 Laine, A. V. 

Andersen, P. T. Larsen, Nels 

Andersen, Oscar Larsen, C. A. 

Andersen -918 Larsen, Ed 

Alfredsen, Adolf Larsen, Axel 

Anderson, Ole A. Livingstone. E. 

Andersen, A. C. Mathisen, Sigurd 

-1108 Magnusen, Lars 
Anderson, G. (Cas- Macfarlane. Jas. 

sie) Maenads, Henry 

Anderson, John Mcintosh, James 
Anderson. Alf. -1638 Mictenen, John 

Anderson. Albert Morrisay. James 

Astnd. Ole Mynkmeyer. H. 

Bekker, Geo. K. Mikkelsen, K. -1620 

Brans, J. A. Miller. James 

,, p. Mortensen. J. R. 

Fienson, D. Moore, Albert 
Benson. C. A. -1894 Newland, Ernst 

Bergstrom, A. Nygren, Gus 

Bach, M. Nielsen. Estwan 

In, K. Nilsen, Peder 

Brennan, P. Nitske. C. 

Bessen, George Nygard. Oluf 

Berg. Johannes Ness, J. 

Carlson, John Nelsen, Adolf 

Connor. W. F. Nelsen. A. W. 

farrnthers. M. Olsen, A. M. -944 

Chrlstensen. -1366 Olsen, James 

on, Oust Olsen. Tellef 

Nottingham. F. Olsen. Harald 

Davldsen, John Olsen, Ole 

in, Geo. Olsen. O. A. -1H0H 

vs. J. O. W. Olsson, I. H. 

Erlksen, Otto Olsen, B. -597 

F-rdman. Paul Olsen, Ohr. M. 

Erlkson, J. R. Olsen. Oswald 

Krbe L J. Ozerhowskl. Leo 

Espedal, J. Pietzman. I* p. 

Evans, J. Publleates. Aug. 

Fernev. P. Peterson. W. 

Fernqulst, C. W. Peterson. Calle 

Ford. L. Powers. James A. 

Franzell, A. Pabst. Max 
IV. 1. rink-sen. B. J. Petersen. Lawrence 

Gardner. James Permin. J. 

Gabrlelsen. P. Poobus. S. 

Gerber, Fritz Rostoln. A. M. 

Gilrov. Wm. Rasmnssen. John 

Hansen. Ole Reaues. N. R. 

Haavold. P. Reinink. H 

HaugTUd, H. O. Robberstad. Nils 

from, Harry Rundstrom. A. 

Halin, J. Pnlvesen. Soerdrup 

Hemes. K. Sehmidt. E. H. 

Henilersen. Rob. Seeley, T. 

H P. -2081 Stein, Herman 

Hohne. A. Rtammerjohan. C. 

flatten. C. Rtrasdln. A. W. 

TTunter. Ernest Samsing. C. J. 
Halvorsen, John L. Samuelsen. W. L. 

r;. H. Sehaurman W. 

Tvorsen. Ole Sampson. O. 

.Taeobson, J. Seffala. E. 

.Taeohson. O. Skedsmoe. A. 

Jensen. Hans Btohr, B. C. 

Jnhansen. Oscar Sorger. E. 

Jnrnensen. Olaf Strand. Ch. 

.Tunge. H. Stewart. V 

.Tnhanson. Aug. Strand. Al. 

Jonsson, Karl Tjormen. K. M. 

Johnsen, Peder Tullgowski. Carl 
Johnson. A. W. -2186Taft. Hans 

.Tansson. B. E. H. Thorsen. Andrew 

son. Oluf Valentlnsen, G. 

Knutsen. Pete Walters. Aug. 

Korki, J. Wernersen. L. 

Koch. W. Wieksten, A. 

ik. Johan Wetland. John 

Krid innsen. Nils Westerlund, Albert 

Knlt.erg. Arvid Walsh, Ed. 

Knlodzu. G. Wahlstrom. E. 

Kruger, Johan Williams. T. C. 

Lewis. James Wlrkstrom, Anton 

Lundersen. Carl Toung, A. 



Phone Main 1202 

L. V. WESTERMAN 

CLOTHIER 

FURNISHER and HATTER 

ALASKA OUTFITTER 

220-222 First Avenue South, at Main 

SEATTLE 



BONNEY- WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 

Four years Assistant Inspeetor of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Tacoma Letter Lilt. 

Adolfsson. Gottfrld Melngall. M. 

Bratt, F. H. Nielsen, Niels -7G1 

Carlson, Gustaf Olsson. Per 

Hodson, H. I. Peel, Peter 

Jacobson, Gustaf Simonson. Sigvard 

Jensen, Hans -1555 Soter, Erik 

Lundgren. Carl Suominen, Oskar 

Magnusson, Ernest Svensen, John 

W. Ullman, Emil 

Marks, Thorwald Vigen, Ellas 
Martlnsson, E. 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 8393 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Alfred Pettersen Hilland, a native 
of Bergen, Norway, age 44, is in- 
quired for by his brother, Randolph 
Pettersen. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, 100 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 7-26-16 

Gumersindo Fernandez, formerly 
messboy on steamer "Watson," 
should call at the offices of Nathan 
H. Frank, 1215 Merchants Exchange 
Bldg., San Francisco, and receive 
salvage money due him from S. S. 
"Camino." 8-30-16 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka. Cal. 

Teddy a Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 



C. O'CONNOR 



612 Fourth St. 



Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider. Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 

Contreras. Julio Kustel. Victor J. 

Kyrkslatt, Lars Klnowsky. A. 

Lawrence, Harry Ingebrethsen, Alf. 
Melander, G. L. 



Alaska Fishermen 



Arentse, John 
Ast, P. 

Rrormare. Adolf 
Carey, Arthur L. 
Frost, H. C. 
Hakanson. John 
Jansen, Jacob 
.Tansson, Axel. J. 
Johnsen. Harry 
Johnsen, August 



Koester, Ernst 
Kester, Erich 
Knudsen, O. 
Larsen, Martin 
Nelson. Chas. R. 
Noland, Edvard 
Oilland, Sven 
Petersen, Andrew 
Werner. Chas. J. 
Wilhelmson, Seth 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Ingvald Andreas Hansen, alias 
Andrew Hansen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 36; tall, dark; last 
heard of July. 1905. His address 
then was, Andrew Hansen, Karluk, 
Kodiak Island, Alaska. He is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Staff Captain Robert Smith, 
district officer, native work, Alaska, 
Box 925, Wrangcll. 4-13-15 

Olof Pedersen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 60, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify J. T. 
Miles. 761 Greenwich St., New York, 
N. Y. 2-16-16 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Thomas Rowe (now aged about 
74), who was at one time a seaman 
and longshoreman on the Pacific 
Coast and also served in the Pacific 
Coast Navy Yards, will greatly oblige 
inquiring relatives by supplying such 
information. Address, Editor, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 1-5-6 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET AT THIRD AND KEARNY 

FALL STYLES NOW READY 
FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

Prices $30 to $50 

Unl ° n OvJn ad Sho'p ° Ur O pEN SATURDAY EVENINGS UNTIL 10 O'CLOCK 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 



Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



P. ROSBNSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, Nils Johansson, Chas. 
Anderson, Rasmus -2407 

Benson, S. Jensen, Henry -2170 

Bernhardsen, Chas. Kjer, Magnus 

Bernadt, H. W. Kristensen, Wm. 

Bosse, Geo. Kroon, Al. 

Brandt, Rrvid Kaskinan, Albert 

Bleile, E. Lindberg, A. C. 

Dybdal, Olaf Lange, Peter H. 

I 'i hi. Ludwig Larsson. Ragnar 

Drosbeck, Carl Lalan, Joe. 

Edstrom, John Moberg, K. G. C. 

Elers, H. Nygren, Gust 

Engstrom, Erick Nilsen, Emil 

Ericksen. H. C. Ohlsson, J. W. 

Fisher, Fritz Oglive, Wm. A. 

Guthre, Raymond Olson, David 

Guildersen. E. Paulson, Herman 

Gregory, W. Palm, P. A. 

Geiger, Joe. Rensmand, Robert 

Hoten, J. Rosenberg, Adolf 

Henriks, Waldemar Swanson, John I>. V. 
I lendrickscn, GeorgeSorensen, Jorgen 

Hoppenbrower, P. Shallies, Gust. 

Il'iman, D. Thoren, Paul 

Jespeisen, Martin Westengren, C. W. 

Jonsson, Karl Zaukert, Carl 
jarwinen, John 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



HU0TARI $ CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Patrick McFee, who was cook on 
board the schooner "Robert Henry" 
on a voyage to Mexico last year, is 
inquired for by the U. S. Shipping 
Commissioner, at San Francisco, Cal. 

9-15-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



Union 

MADE 

Beer 




7Ue 

ANI> 

Porter 



*&&> Of America ^c^t 

COPYRIGHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 

THIS IS OUK LABEL 



DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

Albers, George Krause, Otto 

Anderson, William Kuldsen, John 

Anderson, John Koster, Walter 

Anderson, Chris. Kottler, William 

Anderson, A. P. Kard, Hjalmar 

Andersen, Andrew Lindholm, John 
Andersen, Olaf -H18Lindgren, Ernst 

FSjerk, Gustav Lindroos, A. W. 

Bjerk, Geo. Lundkvist, Alarick 

Burmeister, T. Ludvigsen, Arne 

Bjorklund, G. Leedham, Max 

Benson, W. J. Lucey, James 

Bowman, C. McLeave, John 

Brogard, N. Munsen, Fred 

Bohn, Gus Nilsen, Harry 

Carlson, Adolf M. Nielsen, C. 

Carlson, Gustaf Nordman, Karl 

Carlson, Walter Olsen, W. 

Christiansen, Paaso, Andrew 

Dedrlck Pettersen, Karl 

Crentz, F. Peterson, Nels 

Davis, Frank A. Peters, Walter 

Deam, James Peltsan, Jacob 

Donalson, Harry Pedersen, Alf 

Eriksen, Ole Risenius, Sven 

Grau, Aksil -1116 Rudt, Walter 

Gronros, Oswald Robertson, A. 

Gronlund, Oskar Scheftner, Bernhard 

-414 Sandgvist, Junnar 

Gueno, Pierre Stemvall, Sigurd 

Harley, Alex Sward, Arnold 

Holmroos, W. Scarabosio, M. 

High, Edward Skotel, A. 

Hansen, Ove Max Toves, H. C. 

Hansen, Jack Torin, Gustaf A. 

Hansen, Thorleif Windt, Walter 

Hylander, Gustaf Williams, T. C. 

Jensen, L. Waaler, Edgar 

Jensen. L. M. P. Wehrman, John 

John, F. .lohanson Wagner, Ed. 

Johnsen, Walter Wedequist, Axel 
Johansen, A. Harry Packages. 

Johnson, Fred -1723 Benson, Charles 

Johansson, Arvo Houstor, Harry 
Johnson, Alexander 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Hans Nilson, a native of Tons- 
berg, Norway, was last heard from 
at Mobile, Ala., is inquired for by 
his mother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts kindly notify Louis 
Donald, Norwegian Vice Consul, 77 
St. Francis St., Mobile, Ala. 12-22-15 

Oscar Olsen, age 37, a native of 
Hallerna, near Gothenborg, Sweden, 
who was sailing on the Great Lakes 
about three years ago, is inquired 
for by John V. Olsen, Sun Com- 
pany, Marcus Hook, Pa. 5-26-15 

Hugo Carlson Ljung, age 29, a 
native of Gothenborg, Sweden, was 
last heard from in a Cable Boat on 
the Atlantic Coast, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify John Carl- 
son Ljung, Jungmansgatan 5, Goth- 
enborg, Sweden. 1-12-16 

Knut Jensen, No. 5018, a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, a 
native of Denmark, is inquired for 
by his wife, Lieschen Jensen, of 
Tangemundc, A/Elbe Ostenerweg, 
No. 7, Germany. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify the Lake 
Seamen's Union, 133 Clinton street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 4-14-15 



Port Townsend, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Paul Laux, American, age 23, 6 
feet tall, who was last heard from 
about 4 years ago at San Jose, Cal., 
supposed to be a sailor, is inquired 
for. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify his father, Carl 
Laux, 112 E. 28th St., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 6-21-16 

Adolph Krakan, last heard of at 
Port Pirie, January, 1912, and again 
in March, 1913, from Warumbo, 118 
miles from Adelaide, South Australia, 
is inquired for by his mother at 
Hamburg, Germany. 8-25-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and 
blue eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Any information regarding Wilhelm 
Kuhme, age 27, a native of Germany, 
who was supposed to have been 
drowned in the wreck of the steam 
schooner "Francis H. Leggett," Sep- 
tember 18, 1914, will be thankfully re- 
ceived by the German Consul, San 
Francisco, Cal. 1-19-16 

Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from 
since 1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother, J. Marjama, 51 
South St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 

Bernard Baasen, a native of She- 
boygan, Wis., a former member of 
the L. S. U., who was last heard 
from at Milwaukee, Wis., April 29, is 
inquired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. Sophie Baarsc--., 561 Clinton 
street, Milwaukee, Wis. 7-5-16 




The voters of Maine have adopted 
the 54-hour bill by a large majority. 
This measure, passed at the last ses- 
sion of the Legislature, but opera- 
tion of which was suspended through 
the medium of the referendum, pro- 
hibits a female or minor from work- 
ing more than 54 hours a week in 
any mercantile or manufacturing es- 
tablishment. 

Admiral Mayo, commanding the 
Atlantic fleet, reported that a 12- 
inch gun on the battleship "Michi- 
gan" had exploded during firing tests 
on the Southern drill grounds, the 
muzzle being blown to pieces, seri- 
ously injuring one man. The Michi- 
gan was immediately ordered to the 
Philadelphia Navy Yard for repairs 
and investigation of the explosion. 

Governor Henderson of Alabama 
has been furnished a copy of the 
evidence, together with the names of 
witnesses, in charges preferred by 
the Bibb county grand jury against 
J. D. Evans, the State's warden at 
the Lucile convict camp. He is 
charged with cruelty to convicts and 
with receiving money from them to 
aid them in obtaining paroles and 
pardons. 

Mrs. Georgia A. Robinson, just 
appointed to the office of police- 
woman at Los Angeles, is the first 
colored woman in the United States 
to hold such a position. Mrs. Rob- 
inson is an unusual woman. She 
speaks French fluently and is study- 
ing Spanish. In her official position, 
Mrs. Robinson visits cafes, dance 
halls and other places of amusement 
frequented by negro juveniles. 

Colorado State officials have 
opened a war on fake homestead 
locators who make it their business 
to advertise falsely about homes in 
Colorado and then locate home- 
steaders for a consideration on lands 
that are not as represented. In many 
cases, it is claimed, persons sell 
their homes and come to Colorado 
with the idea that they can sccuri' 
land upon which they can make a 
living from the start and that they 
do not need any money after their 
arrival there. 

The value of property in the State 
of California has increased $266,- 
699,690 during the year 1916, accord- 
ing to the reports of the county Aud- 
itors of the State, just compiled. The 
reports show the total value of the 
property in the State to be $3,578,- 
146,434, against $3,311,446,744 for 

1915. One of the chief causes is the 
greater acreage of land assessed this 
year than last. In 1915 there were 
46,412,143 acres assessed, while this 
year there were 49,255,160. The total 
indebtedness of the counties of (lie 
State has increased about $4,000,000. 
In 1915 it was $62,628,614 and for 

1916, $66,370,265. 

Determined to solve differences 
between the United States and Mex- 
ico, and substitute mediation for 
shot and shell, representatives of the 
two countries are holding sessions in 
New London, Conn. The Mexican 
representatives have emphasized the 
work of rehabilitating their country, 
which has been done by the Car- 
ranza administration and the rapid 
progress that is being made in re- 
establishing order. Proposed re- 
forms in educational and agricultural 
lines have been related in detail by 
the Mexicans, who have pointed out 
that the recognition of the Carranza 
government has greatly assisted the 
constitutionalists in their work. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




A new wrecking tug for the Mer- 
ritt-Chapman Co., named the "Reso- 
lute," arrived at New York recently 
from Ashtabula, O., where she was 
built, by way of the St. Lawrence 
Canals and the coast. She is of 
steel, 453 tons gross, 219 net and 
has a speed of about ten knots, 
to her. The "Matatua" has had hard 
luck of late. She sank in St. John 
Harbor, was raised to the surface and 
brought to dry dock at Halifax. 
She was repaired and proceeded to 
Campbellton, where she loaded a 
cargo of deals for the U. K. Leav- 
ing Campbellton she went ashore at 
♦St. Mary's Bay. 

The steamer "Qucbra," wrecked off 
Big Blaskets Island, was built in 
1912, 4538 tons, and her insured value 
of £70,000 in no way represents the 
extent of the loss. Owned by the 
Mercantile S. S. Co., Ltd., she was 
running in the Cunard service, and 
was bound east from this side when 
the casualty occurred. 

Twenty-four steamships are sched- 
uled to sail from Galveston during 
the current month carrying cotton to 
Europe. The berth freight market 
is firm, with tonnage scarce. Five 
of the listed ships already have full 
cargoes awaiting them. For wheat 
shipments no Manchester room is 
available, and Liverpool is quoted at 
13.9@14. 

G. M. Cochrane launched from his 
shipyard at Port Greville, N. S., 
September 1, the four-masted schoon- 
er "Ada Tower," 157.5 ft. long, 36,4 
wide, 12.9 deep, and 528 tons registry. 
She is fitted with stockless anchors, 
gasoline engines for hoisting sails, 
anchors and cargo, and all the latest 
improvements. She will load deals 
at Port Greville for the U. K. 

On account of increasing traffic 
at the Atlantic terminus of the Canal 
the tug "Bohio" has been trans- 
ferred to the Marine Division from 
the Dredging Division service. The 
Captain of the Port at Cristobal 
has now three tugs available for 
harbor work, the "Bohio," "Engi- 
neer" and "Porto Bello," two of 
which are available for quick service 
at any hour of the day or night. 

The Austrian steamship "Mora- 
witz," interned at the port of Gal- 
veston since the beginning of the 
European war, has been shifted up 
the ship channel to the turning basin 
near Houston, where the Austrian 
steamer "Campania" is lying. They 
will remain at the turning basin 
until the close of the war. The 
water in the basin is fresh and much 
more desirable than salt water. 

Bids for the four battleships, scout 
cruisers, submarines, destroyers and 
all other craft authorized in the 
new naval act, except the four battle 
cruisers and the ammunition ship, 
will be opened October 18. It is 
expected that the battle cruiser plans 
will be ready for advertisement by 
October 1, a month earlier than pre- 
viously estimated. The entire 1917 
program probably will be under con- 
tract before January 1. 

The American International Cor- 
poration own fully 40 per cent, of 
the 200,000 shares of the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company. Another 40 
per cent, is owned by W. R. Grace 
& Co. The market on this stock is 
made by the small minority still in 
the hands of the public. A large 
majority of the approximately 80,000 
shares of this stock owned by the 
American International Corporation, 
was acquired at $12.50 per share. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

THE GERMAN BANK 
Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. Corner Halght and Belvedere. 

June 30th, 1916 

Assets $63,811,228.81 

Deposits -------- 60,727,194.92 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - 2,084,033.89 

Employees' Pension Fund ----- 222,725.43 

Number of Depositors ----- 68,062 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors" 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Abrahamsen, A. Andersson, A. -ITS-' 

Abrahamsen, Berner Andersson, Erlck 
Abrahamsson, W. Andersson, Ernst 
-Mil. Kinar T. -1781 

Ahlfors, Arthur Andersson, G. -1229 

Albertsky, Fritz Andersson, Gottfried 
Alksen, Charlie Andersson, J. P. 

Alto, John Andersson, L. H. 

Amundsen, Albert Andresen, A. -1635 
Amundsen, Amund Antonsen, Carl 
Andersen, C. -1716 Antonsen, Marius 
Anderson, C. F. Apple, August 
Anderson, Ernst Anls. Tobias 

Anderson, F. -1473 Arndt, Paul 
Anderson, J. C. -1552Asklund, Gus. 
Anderson, John Asinan, Herman 

Anderson, Ole Asterman, Oscar 

Anderson, Gustav Aultomen, C. A. 
W. 



Johnson, Nels 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Ole 

Kaasiuk, August 
KaUberg, Arvid 
Kargar, F. 
Karkis, Juho 
Kailson, Karl 
Kelly, Patrick 
Kiippin, Matti 
KlaltenhuU, Hans 
Knell, Alex 
Knudson, Conrad 

Laldstlne, Chas. 

l.aiitz, Gus 
l.arson, J. 
Larson, Johannes 
liaison, Edward 
Lato, Edvard 
Law, John 
Lebrun, Ernst 
Leelkaln, M. 
i.<- >\ is, Peter 
Lidstein, Chas. 
i-.indenau, E. 
Lindhulm, Nels 



Johnson, Pete 
Jordan, Henry S. 
Josefsen, Ben 

Knut, Alex 
Kohl berg, Billy 

Kolustos, A. -1220 
Kretschmann, S. M. 
Kristensen, D. K. 
Kroff, Georg 
Kroon, P. 
Kiuit, Alex 
Kuger, Gustav 
Kuhn, John 

Lindberg, A. J. 
Link, A. 
LiOlning, Herman 
Loland, Louis 
Lorentaen, K. 
Lulsten, Chas. 
Lundberg, Allan E. 
Lundberg, Uskar 
Lundbeig, Torsten 
Lund, J. William 
Lund, Peter 
Lunstedt, Chris. 
Lurtin, Paul 



Sederholm, Karl 
Seiffert. Johannes 
Seiffert. L. 
Seland. A. 
Selenius, llj. 
Semseter, Paul 
SI. allies, Gust 
Sjogren, E. 
Skellerig, A. 
Skjnldonborg, F. 
Skold. C. A. 
Sievers, G. P. 
Simonsen, Oskar 

Talken, G. 
Taube, August 
Tellefssen, A. E. 
Tennyson, F. 
Thompson, G. E. 
Thompson, Peter 
Thompson, T. 
Thorstensen, B. 
Thorstensen, Theo. 

Valboe, Harry 
Valfre, George 
Van Lubke, John 



Smith, J. F. 
Smith, William 
Snellman, Tor. 
Sorensen, Viggo 
Stangeland. Petter 
Steen. Ivar 
Stlenen. John 
Stinessen, Harald 
Sverdrup, Thornald 
P. Swanson, C. -1050 
Swanson, J. N. 
Swanson, Thomas 

Thygesen, Ole S. 
Tillman, A. E. 
Tonissen, Peter 
Topel, F. E. 
Torjusen, G. -41 
Trondhjem, F. O. 
Tuck. Wm. 
Twede, J. 



Veckenstedt, Wil- 
liam 
Vlckery, Curtis 



Van Ryan, Henry Villemayer, W. 
Varnsquist. Ernst Virtonen, Chas. 
Vestvik, Ingolf 



■ 1421 



Horn, Folke 
Baumeister, John 
Beahan, Edw. 
Behr, Henry 
Benson, John 
Bertelson, O. 
Bey, O. -2248 
Bjork. Rudolf 
Black, John 

Carey, A. L. 
Carlsen, Frank 
Carlsen, Hans 
Carlson, August 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Carlstrand, Gust 
Carroll, John J. 
Carter, Sidney 
Cateches, Constan- 
tino 
Catt, Fred. 
Cavanagh, J. E. 
Creely, Tom 
Christensen. Albert 

Dahlstrom, G. M. 
Dalgard, C. 
Dalley, P. 
Danielsen, E. 
1 lanielsen, H. 
Dehler, Fred 
Danielsen, N. 
Danielsen, Sigurd 
Danlelson, Dave 
Davis, Frank E. 

Eaton, Isaac N. 
Kk. Charlie 
Eckstrom, George 
Eglit, Hans 
Eklund, Gus 
Eichler, Karl 
Eklund, John 
Eliason, C. 
Ellis. B. 
Ellison, Sam 
Elricht. Fritz 

Fagerstrom, Oscar 
Ferguson, E. A. 
Fiol, Robert 
Fjellman, Georg 
Fjellman, J. A. 
Fjellman, Karl 

Caupseth, Sigurd Grundman, J. 
(".ran, Akset -1116 Gulbransen, Bjorn 

Granberg, Fred Gundersen, Jacob 

Granstrom, Nestor Gundersen. K. -899 

Grant, David Gunther, R. -756 

Grant, Otto Gunther, Ted 

Grass, Chas. Gustafson, Axel 
Graugaard, L. J. 



Blum, M. B. 
Bohm, August 
Bolin, Charley 
Bower, G. 
Brandt, B. 
2184 Brenen, Wm. 
Buchanan, L. 
Buse, Alfred 



Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Louis 
Christensen, Tony 
Christensen, Viggo 
Christiansen, N. 

-1093 
Christoffersen, Alb. 
Cirul. M. 
Clausen, Ingeman 
Clipper, Mike 
Conolly, Obirt 
Contreras. Julius 
Cook, Harry 
Crosby, J. 

De Klerk, D. -925 
De Roos, J. 
De Vrles, Albertus 
Diez. Th. Harry 
Dohlen, Jurgen 
Iiolan, Charley 
Donnelly, J. 
Dracar, Edgardo 
J miin, C. W. 

Engstrom, Edward 
Engstrom, Erik 
Ericson, Arthur 
Ericsson, M. F. A. 
Erikkila, Vilho 
Erikson, Neils 
Eriksen. Peder C. 
Evans, David 
Eugene, John 
Evensen, Louis 

Fredholm, C. J. 
Fredriksen, F. M. 
Fredrikson, H. 
Freiberg, Peter 
Fritsch, Leonard 
Fugelutsen, Th. 



Mack, Edward 

Macker, David 

Madsen, Georg 

Magnuson, Carl 

Makelainen, Anton 

-Mangold, A. H. 

ilanslield, Harry 

Markmann, Heinr. 

iVlai kiiiann, M. -1079Meyerdierk, H 

Marlensen, J. C. Miller, A. E 



McCann, J. C. 
McCusken, John 
McGlaslan, \V. T. 
McManus, 1'. 
Mcpherson, Dan. 
Melgand, Richard 
Melson, William 
Mennicke, I 



2191 
Marlensen, O. 
Mathews. R. 
Mathison, Einar 
Mathsen, Lewis 
Martinez, A. 
Martin, H. 
Mathieson, Ludvig 
Mayers, Paul M. 

Nelen, Alt 
Nelsen, Andy 
Nelson, Carl C. 
Nelson, N. R. 



-Miller, Hilding 
Mogensen, C. 
Moonan, Thomas 
Monsen, Andrew 
Monsen, Birger 
Monsen, C. 
Murphy, Geo. 
Myrhoj, J. P. 

Nilsen, Hans L. 
Nllsen, N. E. -609 
Nilsen, Uskar J. 
Nilsson, Hilding 



Nelsson, N. E. -552 Nilsson, Reinhold 



Gregersen, John 
Gregg, O. F. 

Hagman. Jalk 



Gustafsson, T. 
Gustavson, Olaf 
Gutman, Paul 

Hedenskog, John 



Nor, Niels P. 
North, N. P. 
Nuwak, Andy 
Nutsen, Gus 
Nygren, Gus 

Olsen, L. E. 

Olsen, O. 

Olsen, O. P. 

Olsen, Oskar 

Olsen, O. I. 

1315 Olson, Frank 

Olson, Oscar 

Olson, Otto 
Osterberg, Henry 



1047 
1141 



Nielsen, Harold 
Nielsen, Hugo 
Nielson, H. J. 
Nikander, Einar 
Nikand, Henry 

Okozin, M. 

Olsen, A. -1303 

Olsen, Adrian 

i. Albert 

Olsen, C. A. 

Olsen, Chas. 

Olsen, Fred 

Olsen, H. -SS5 

Olsen, Hans 

Olsen, Hans -1225 Opderbeck, Eugen 

Olsen, J. Osolin, Oscar 

Olsen, John -1222 Osterhoff, H. 



W'akrom, John 
Walentinson, <;. 
Wallgren, I. M. 

-1314 
Wapper, John 
Walters, H. J. 
Walter, J. 
Warrer, Harold 
Wene. K. J. 
Werth, Gus 

valdemar 
Werner, Chas. J. 
lal, Ernest 
Wicklund, T. S. 
Wk-kman, P. 

Ziehr, Ernst 



Wiitr. Frank 
Wiken, Erik 
Wikstrom, Anton 
Wilker, I. W. 
Williams. Fred J. 
Williams. J. F. 
Williams, T. C. 
Williams. William 
Wills, George 
Wilson, George 
Winblad, M. 
Wlnther. Hakon H. 
Wold, Theodore 
Wyllie, Jas. 

Zlrnbauer, Charly 



PACKAGES. 

Baker, C Mlkalsen. Andreas 

Berling, J. B. Olsen, Carl -llol 

Conolly, O. Olsen, H. C. 

Gunvaldsen, Ingvald Olsen, O. J. -1020 



Haave, Norva] 

Hanson, Chris. 
Jansson, A. L. 
Jensen, Henry 
Johansen, Nikolai 
Johnson, Norman 
Lornsen, Crist 
Lundquist, Frank 



Osterholm, J. W. 
Opderbeck, Eugen 
Pedersen, H. -1261 
Peningrud, L. 
Ramstad, Andreas 
Rarly. Frans 
Schlacht, Alfred 
Snellman. Tor 



Mathisen, H. -1759 Wikstrom, Carl 



Too Good. — "Strange, Mary doesn't 
have any offers! She'd make some 
man a good wife." 

"Yes; but the trouble is every 
one knows she'd make him a good 
husband too." — Life. 



Il.ikansson, Ingvar Heiberger, M. B 
Hallowes, L. N. Heldt, Carl 
Hammarquist, A. C. Helschel, H. 



Hansen, Carl 

Hansen, C. M. 

Hansen, N. S. 

Hansen, R. 

Hansen, Viggo 

Hansen, William 

Hansen, Marius 

Hansen, M. -968 

Hansen, W. H. C. 

Hartog, J. 
Haubthoff. Fritz 

Hecker, Willie 

Ingvalsen. A. B. 

Isaacson, George 

Jacobs, Aug. 

Jacobson. Emil 

Jakobsen, Jakob 

Jacobsen, J. 

Jakobsen, J. -1865 Johanson,' John 

Johansen. Nikolai Johanson. N. A. -280 

Jacobs, Fred Johanson. J. -880 

.Tnkobsen, Valdemar Johansson Rernnnl 

Jansson, F. J. Johansson. J. R 

Jenkins, Fred Johansson. W 

Jenning, George 



Henderson, Rob 
Ilcnriksen. Charles 
HeriiiR. A. H. K. 
Herlitz. Knud 
Hetherington, A. T. 
Hetman, Walter 
Hole, Sigvald 
Holmstrom, David 
Holsen, Henry 
Housten. Robert 
Hugo. Otto 
Huotarl, J. 

Israelsen, Isak 

Johansen, Louis 

Johanson, Carl 

Johanson. E A. 

Johanson, J. 



Jensen, C. -2318 
Jensen, Henry 
Jensen, Ll E. 
•Tnhannesen. Helge 
Johannesen. J. 
.Tohannessen. Kail 
Johansen, Fritz 



Johnsen, Jakob 

Johnson. C. -irion 

Johnson, C. -2094 

Johnson, Carl 

Johnson, Ernst 

Johnson. Evert 

Johnson, I. 



Olsen, John 

Palken, G. 
l'almquist, Albert 
Palquist, Albert 
Parsons, Herman 
Partanen, Johan 
Paulsen, James 
Pearson, J. A. 
Pedersen, Ole 
Pederson, Charly 
Pedersen, H. S. 
Pedersen, Krist 
Pedersen, Kristian 
Petersen, Wm. 
Pekman, E. 
Peletneky. H. 
Pestoff, S. 

Quinn, Wm. 

Kaasin, MattO 
Kahl, Willy 
Ramstad, Andreas 
Randropp, John 
Rasmussen, J. - 
Rasmussen, L. 
Rasmussen, S. A. 
Reinnold, Ernst 
Reith, Kurt 
Richard. Fred 
Kiis, A. 
Ringdal, R. T. 
Rinkel. H. 
Rlesbeck, m 

Saari, A. 
Samuelsen, I. 
Sandblom, Konrad 

ler, Otto 
Sandstrom, Gus. 
Sanne, Rudolf 
Schauer, Wolf 
Schliemann, F. 
Schmidt. G. 



Overwick, Thomas 

Petersen, A. -1675 
Petersen, Christian 
Peterson, A. 
Peterson, Chas. 
Peterson, F. 
Peterson, L. -1389 
Petersson, Robert 
Pettersen, O. II. 
Pettersen, O. W. 
Pettersen, F. -1526 
Plate, Diedrick 
Pool, M. 
Post, W. S. 
Pottage, C. E. 
Priehn, A. 



Qunilan, Thos. 

Risgaard, Soren 
Roalsen, Fred 
Roden, Knut 
Roester, Walter 
446 Rogirson, Peter 
Roos, Bert 
Rosberg, N. 
Roster, Hugo 
Rundqvist, Oskar 
Runge, Charlie 
Rutsid, Fred 
Ryan. Patrick 
Rytko, Otto 



Schmidt, I. -2827 
Schmidt, John 
Schneider, E. 

Schneider, Harry 
s, -iiui.it, Theo. 
Schutt, W. 
Schwarzien, Wil- 

helm 
Sederholm. Anton 



Game.— "When you're whipped," 
said Mr. Dolan, "you ought to say 
you've had enough." 

"If I've strength left to say I've 
had enough," replied Mr. Rafferty, 
"I'm not whipped yet. — Washington 
Star. 

Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 
Res., Park 6950 

Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 

Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



J. MILLER 

124 EAST STREET Garfield 690 

Union Store 

HATS, CAPS, 

FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

Suits Steam Cleaned, $1.50 



White Palace Shoe Store 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market, 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest 
Machinery. :: Work Called For and Delivered. 

WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



IS 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 
Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 60 cents per day, or 
J 2 to $2.50 per week, with all modern 
conveniences. Free Hot and Cold Shower 
Bath on every floor. Elevator Service. 
AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up, $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Garfield 833 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished Up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: 25, 30 and 
50 cts. per Day. $1.25 per Week and Up. 
Free Baths — Large Reading Room 
1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 
Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



JORTALLBROS.EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 
Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



16 FOLSOM STREET 

HOOKS 

Lumber, Crates, Rice, Sugar for all 
kinds of Stevedore Work. 

J. MAHER 



HULTEN $ RUDOLPH 

Formerly Cutter Formerly Tailor 

for Tom Williams for Tom Williams 

TAILORS 

SUITS TO ORDER 

CLEANING and PRESSING 

39 Sacramento Street Near Market 



Capt Chas. J. Swanson 



CLASSY CLOTHIER 
HATTER AND FURNISHER 
DOUGLAS SHOES 
UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



PHONE DOUGLAS 1082 
139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Merchant and Washington 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 

Issued by Authontyoi the Cigar Makers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

ElllS CcVtrf lf3 That the Cirjirs contained minis box ravs teen made bya I II5VCIJS$ Workman, 

aMlMSCKOf THE ClGAH MAKEBi • INttR«4II0H»L UNION ol Amenta, in orjJIMJT'On rjevoteO ft the ad 

vancemenl ol the MORAl MATERIALand iNliiUCIUAl WUIARt Of THE CHAfT. Thtieiorexe lecauutienj 
these Cioais to all smokers throughout the world 
All Infringements upon this Label will be punished according to law 





The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Resources. $7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Ginty 

S. Bissinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozio Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Plchon 



PRACTICAL NAVIGATION 

Taught by a practical Navigator. Only 
a limited number of students will be 
accepted, as the teaching will be indi- 
vidual. For rates and other information 
Address, 

H. HEINKE 

NAVIGATION INSTRUCTOR 
Spain and 2d Streets Sonoma, Cal. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 

Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, 
MANAGEMENT, CIRCULATION, ETC., 
REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF CON- 
GRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912, 
of Coast Seamen's Journal, published 
weekly at San Francisco, Cal., for 
October 1, 1916. 

State of California, 
County of San Francisco — ss. 

Before me, a Deputy Clerk, United 
States Circuit Court of Appeals, for the 
Ninth circuit, in and for the State and 
county aforesaid, personally appeared I. M. 
Holt, who, having been duly sworn accord- 
ing to law, deposes and says that he is 
the Business Manager of the Coast Sea- 
men's Journal, and that the following is, 
to the best of his knowledge and belief, a 
true statement of the ownership, man- 
agement (and if a daily paper, the cir- 
culation), etc., of the aforesaid publica- 
tion for the date shown in the above 
caption, required by the Act of August 
24, 1912, embodied in section 443, Postal 
Laws and Regulations, printed on the 
reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of 
the publisher, editor, managing editor, 
and business managers are: 

Name of — ■ Postoffice address — 

Publisher, Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Editor, Paul Scharrenberg, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Managing Editor, Paul Scharrenberg, San 

Francisco, Cal. 
Business Manager, I. M. Holt, San 

Francisco, Cal. 

2. That the owners are: (Give names 
and addresses of individual owners, or, 
if a corporation, give its name and the 
names and addresses of stockholders 
owning or holding 1 per cent, or more 
of the total amount of stock.) 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, San Fran- 
cisco; not a corporation. Principal offi- 
cers of the Sailors' Union: Andrew Fu- 
ruseth. Secretary; Ed. Andersen, Treas- 
urer, San Francisco. 

3. That the known bondholders, mort- 
gagees, and other security holders own- 
ing or holding 1 per cent, or more of 
total amount of bonds, mortgages, or 
other securities are: (If there are none, 
so state.) 

None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next 
above, giving the names of the owners, 
stockholders, and security holders, if 
any, contain not only the list of stock- 
holders and security holders as they ap- 
pear upon the books of the company 
but also, in cases where the stockholder 
or security holder appears upon the 
books of the company as trustee or in 
any other fiduciary relation, the name of 
the person or corporation for whom such 
trustee is acting, is given; also that the 
said two paragraphs contain statements 
embracing affiant's full knowledge and 
belief as to the circumstances and con- 
ditions under which stockholders and se- 
curity holders who do not appear upon 
the books of the company as trustees, 
hold stock and securities in a capacity 
other than that of a bona fide owner; 
and this affiant has no reason to believe 
that any other person, association, or 
corporation has any interest direct or In- 
direct in the said stock, bonds, or other 
securities than as so stated by him. 

I. M. HOI/I". Business Manager. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me 
this 25th day of September, 1916. 
(Seal) PAUL P. O'BRIEN. 

Deputy Clerk, United States Circuit . 

Court of Appeals, for the Ninth Circuit. 



News from Abroad. 



Proof Positive. — Tom — So you 
really think you have some chance 
with Miss Coldcash, do you? , 

Jack --Thai's what. Six is begin-, 
ning to find fault with my necktie. 



King Constantine was reported on 
Wednesday as ready for an imme- 
diate declaration of war on Bulgaria. 
As things stand, that seems to be 
his only chance to keep the crown. 

The situation on the Macedonian 
front remains nearly unchanged, ex- 
cept at the western extremity of the 
line, where the Serbians drove the 
Bulgarians back toward Monastir and 
successfully repulsed twelve desper- 
ate counter-charges on the Kaimak- 
calan ridge. 

Last Monday German aeroplanes 
raided Bucharest, killing 60 persons 
and wounding many. A German re- 
port admitted that Russian aeroplanes 
raided with success a naval aero- 
drome near the Gulf of Riga, but 
claimed that they were driven off 
with the loss of a machine. 

The Province of Ontario closed 
all bars and liquor shops on Sep- 
tember 16. This is in compliance 
with a war measure that is to re- 
main in force three years unless re- 
pealed. Liquor dealers will be per- 
mitted to sell "soft" drinks, includ- 
ing beer with two and a half per 
cent, alcohol. 

Sunday and Monday nights last 
week England was raided by large 
Zeppelin squadrons. Two Zeppelins 
that reached London were brought 
down by aeroplanes and anti-aircraft 
guns. In the first raid by twelve 
Zeppelins 38 persons were killed and 
125 wounded. In the second, which 
was confined to the eastern coast, 26 
persons were killed and 27 wounded. 

Von Falkenhayn has achieved a 
singular victory in the Hermannstadt 
sector on the Rumanian front by 
defeating successively two armies 
sent against him. On the Dobrudja 
front, both sides are apparently rest- 
ing and gathering their strength after 
the Rumanians and Russians had 
successfully turned Mackensen's drive. 
Though terrific fighting has been ta- 
king place on the Russian line, both 
sides there seem for the moment to 
have reached an impasse. 

The great battle on the Sornme 
continued with steady gains for both 
British and French, and with a great 
loss of life admitted by Allies and 
Germans. Early in the week the 
two important centers of Thiepval 
and Combles fell, Thiepval to the 
British assault and Combles to the 
combined forces. The Germans 
launched a powerful drive in the 
Thiepval sector, driving the British 
out of some of the captured trenches, 
but finally being repulsed. 

The German Press reports that the 
Federation of German Shipbuilding 
Yards has formed a special War 
Committee to consider the best meth- 
ods of employing the state subsidy 
promised by the Reichstag for build- 
ing merchant vessels on the largest 
possible scale. Considerable diver- 
gencies of opinion have hitherto ex- 
isted on this subject between ship- 
owners and shipbuilders, which it is 
hoped the committee will surmount. 

The Chilean Government has given 
official approval to the organization 
of La Fortuna Navigation Co. of 
Punta Arenas. This company has a 
paid-up capital of £20,000 ($97,000), 
and its purpose is to navigate the 
Strait of Magellan and adjacent 
canals, calling at the ports of Pata- 
gonia and Tierra del Fuego and Mal- 
vinas Islands. It will purchase or 
lease boats to be used in thi 
wise service, beginning operations be- 
fore the 1st of October. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits. 



True Candor.— "Am I good enough 
for you?" sighed the fond lover. 

"No," said the girl candidly, 
"yi.u're not, but you are too good 
for any other girl."— New York 
Tiiiies. 



He Qualified.— "My daughter," said 
the father, "has always been accus- 
tomed to all the luxuries of wealth." 

"Vees," replied the count, bristling 
up. "Zat ees what I am."— Christian 
Register. 



Ladder Needed.— Lady— We always 
keep the hose ready, in case of a 
Zeppelin raid. 

Visitor— But surely, my dear, it 
would never reach them at the height 
they fly. — Punch. 



End of Friendship.— She— How did 
they ever come to marry? 

He—Oh, it's the same old story. 
Started out to be good friends, you 
know, and later on changed their 
minds.— Pall Mall Gazette. 



your 



The Reason— "How long did 

last cook stay with you?" 
"Oh, about five hours." 
"How did that happen?" 
"The afternoon train back to town 

has been discontinued." — Birmingham 

Age-Herald. 



Hopeless Plight.— "Hallo, Newedd, 
why so somber?" 

"Say, old man, I've made a very 
painful discovery. My wife can't 
sing." 

"Painful? Why, man, you are to 
ongratulated." 

"Alas, no! You see she thinks 
she can." — Boston Transcript. 



Presence of Mind. — "Oh, John!" 
shrieked Mrs. Dorkins, "The baby 
has swallowed a silver piece." 

Mr. Dorkins took a handful of 
change out of his pocket and looked 
it over. 

"Calm yourself, Maria," he said. 
"It was that counterfeit quarter I've 
been trying to get rid of."— Brooklyn 
Citizen. 



An Invitation 

We invite deposits from every one- 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 





Union Label of the 
UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are 
counterfeits. 
)HN W. SCULLEY, President MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary-Treasurer 

Rooms 72-73 Bible House, New York City 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 
NOTICE! BOSS OF ROAD 
OVERALLS— PRICE, 80 CENTS 



Phone Douglas 1737 



Demand the Union Label 



Did you ever stop to think that 
there is from one-half to one ounce 
more Tobacco in the 10c Pouches 
GOLD SHORE CUT PLUG 
SMOKING than in the advertised 
10c tins, and not any better Tobacco 
grows than the BAGLEY CO. put 
in GOLD SHORE. Why buy tin 
cans to throw away, when the pouch 
is so much more practical as a pocket 
package, and contains more Tobacco? 



UNION 




MADB 



Christensen's Navigation School 

Established 1906 

ON AND AFTER JAN. 1, 1916, CHRISTENSEN'S NAVIGATION SCHOOL 
WILL BE LOCATED AT ROOMS 353-355-357-359, HANSFORD BLDG 
ENTRANCE AT 25 CALIFORNIA AND 268 MARKET STS. 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 






Upholding American 
PROSPERITY 




The key to Prosperity Is Saving! 
So make up your mind to prosper 
by buying one of Hale's $1.00 Banks 
for only 50c. It Is the best possible 
way to teach the children thrift and 
the vital principles of saving. We 
keep the key, and you can only open 
the Bank by bringing It to Hale's. 
Do what you wish with the money. 
Banks on Sale at Transfer Desk. 




LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 

in 4 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



H. SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 

FURNISHING GOODS 



693 THIRD STREET, San Francisco 



WE HAVE NO BRANCH STORES— ONLY ONE BIG STORE 
Watch Repairing Guaranteed Two Years 

The Popular Price Jewelry Store 

715 MARKET STREET Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 




cfewnaenCa 



Jewelers, Watchmakers and 

James Jt.Sorensem Opticians 

\i?r*3. ana Jroau ' 

Everything Bought or Repaired at Our Store is Positively Guaranteed 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BCD SEAL CWAB 10., MANIXAITUBCBS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



"YOUR HATTER" 
FRED AMMANN 



72 MarKet Street 
San Francisco 



Union Hats 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



TS 








O In 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXX, No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1916. 



Whole No. 2403. 



THE EUREKA CONVENTION. 



Organized Labor of California Shapes Course of Action for Future. 



The 17th annual convention of the California 
State Federation of Labor was in session at 
Eureka during the past week. As in previous 
years, representatives from the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific, the Marine Firemen, Oilers and 
Watcrtenders' Union of the Pacific, the Marine 
Cooks and Stewards' Association of the Pacific 
Coast and the Alaska Fishermen's Union took 
an active part in the Convention's work. 

In view of the fact that the interests of the 
four marine unions in this convention were 
practically identical the delegates drafted the 
following joint report for submission to their 
respective constituents: 

With more than 200 delegates from every 
part of the State in attendance, the seventeenth 
annual convention of the California State Feder- 
ation of Labor opened in Eureka on Monday, 
October 2, with Daniel 1'. Haggerty of San 
Francisco, president of the Federation, pre- 
siding. Preceding the opening session there 
was a street parade of the delegates and their 
friends through the downtown district. 

The convention was called to order by John 
P. Ryan, chairman of the convention commit- 
tee. Invocation was offered by the Rev. P. 
Bordup of Eureka. Mayor E. Falk welcomed 
the delegates in behalf of the citizens of Eureka. 
California Labor Movement Prospers. 

The reports of the executive officers and 
organizers showed that the organized labor 
movement of California has thrived and pros- 
pered in the face of strong opposition during 
the past year. 

In Los Angeles, where the opposition of or- 
ganized labor has always been strong, the 
unions have gained a material increase in mem- 
bership during the past year, and a score of 
new unions have been organized in that city 
during the past twelve months, according to the 
report of General Organizer Joshua B. Dale. 

The report of the secretary showed conclus- 
ively that amalgamation of the smaller unions 
is constantly taking place. Thus, while there 
has been an increase in the membership of the 
federation by approximately 150(1, the number 
of local unions affiliated has decreased from 
498 to 481. On the other hand there was re- 
corded an increase in the number of Central 
Labor Councils from 18 to 21, showing that 
amalgamation and federation are the order of 
the day. 

The Federation's legislative program demands 
the enactment of an anti-injunction law similar 
to the Clayton anti-injunction act passed by 
Congress: the enacting of a law which will 
abolish all employment agencies operated for 
profit, and several important amendments to the 
California workmen's compensation act. 

A number of other legislative measures de- 
sired by various affiliated crafts were approved 
but the above named proposals will constitute 
the main labor issues before the next session 
of the California Legislature. 

The convention took definite action upon the 
seven propositions to be submitted to the people 



of California at the November general election. 
The seven proposals will appear on the ballot 
in the following order: 

1. Complete Prohibition. 1920 (Initiative). 

2. Partial Prohibition, 1918 (Initiative). 

3. State Highway $15,000,000 bond issue 
(Legislat ive proposal). 

4. Direct Primary (Referendum). 

5. Taxation on Land Values only (Initiative). 

6. Making legislators ineligible to other office 
(Initiative). 

7. Amending highway act of 1909 so counties 
will bear part of interest on road bonds (Leg- 
islative proposal). 

The Convention declared favorably upon 
propositions Nos. .3, 4, 5 and 7. Propositions 
Nos. 1, 2 and 6 were opposed by the practically 
unanimous vote of the Convention. 

Fraternal Delegate Suzuki's Address. 

One of the features of this year's convention 
was the address of Fraternal Delegate Suzuki 
from the Laborers' friendly Society of Tokio, 
Japan. The delegate from Japan spoke in part 
as follows: 

"It is needless to say that sympathy is the key 
to mutual understanding and true friendship. 
It was the kindness and sympathy which you 
accorded me last year that gave me a lasting 
inspiration and marked an epoch-making period 
in the labor movement of Japan. Inspired by 
your encouragement, I have devoted all of my 
time and energy for the expansion of the Yu- 
Ai-Kai, or Laborers' Friendly Society of Japan, 
of which I am president, and which T represent 
in this great convention. During the last eight 
months I have traveled over 6000 miles and 
have addressed more than 100 meetings. Every- 
where I went I conveyed to my countrymen 
the message of your friendship and good will 
which you so generously showered upon me. 
I told them of the wonderful power of your 
organization. When I told them that your 
unity and cooperation have made your or- 
ganization strong, their eyes were bright with a 
new-born hope. They felt the thrill of inspira- 
tion and resolved to attain unto your standard. 
As a tangible result of this agitation, the awak- 
ening of the Japanese laborer was very marked. 
During the last eight months the membership 
of the organization I represent has increased 
from 7000 to more than 25,000 members. I am 
convinced that at the end of next year our 
membership and influence will compare favor- 
ably with your California State Federation of 
Labor. 

Japanese Seamen Obtain Increase. 

"During the past eight months I have settled 
six strikes, most of the cases ending favorably 
for the workers involved. The seamen em- 
ployed by the Nippon Yusen Kaisha went on 
strike for a 20-per-cent. increase in wages and 
got what they demanded. The dock workers in 
ifoki i ha ma ecui ed an inci ea se of 10 per cent 

"The workers in Japan believe thai tin- labor 

movement should not be monopolized by one 
nation or one people. Labor knows no rao 
■ ■■I religion, li there be any who think 

that the Japanese do not understand the spirit 



and ideal of the world-wide labor movement, it 
is an insult to the Japanese and to humanity. 
It is man's instinct to better his conditions and 
to promote his welfare. Since the European 
war, Japanese industries have been making 
wonderful strides. The present offers the gold- 
en opportunity for the Japanese to organize and 
increase their influence. The springtime has 
dawned in the labor movement of Japan. When 
the zephyr sweeps the surface of a frozen lake 
the ice begins to melt. When the ice has 
melted and the snow has vanished we know the 
season of flowers and singing birds is at hand. 
Like zephyrs that melt the ice of a rigorous 
winter, the recent strikes are the harbingers of 
an organized labor movement in Japan. An- 
other interesting indication is the awakening of 
the Japanese government, which has resulted in 
the passage of much social legislation during 
the past year, such as the simple insurance act, 
similar to social insurance laws in Germany, 
factory inspection laws, etc. In the coming 
session of the Imperial diet it is expected that 
a bill will be introduced which will be a fore- 
runner of much trade-union legislation. 
Workers in Japan Against War. 

"Labor should always be a staunch defender 
of peace. War will never bring happiness to 
the laboring class, though it may benefit for 
the steel kings and munition-makers. War des- 
troys civilization and retards human progress. 
It causes misery to the toiling millions. The 
purpose of labor is creation, not destruction. It 
stands for human progress instead of degrada- 
tion, f cannot help feeling pity for the in- 
ability of the workers of Europe to prevent the 
horrible catastrophe. We cannot afford to re- 
peat their madness. I wish to express my 
hearty congratulations for this Federation for 
its attitude assumed toward the preparedness 
parade. While in Japan, I read with satisfaction 
the speech of my esteemed comrade, Paul 
Scharrenberg, delivered at the peace mass meet- 
ing preceding the preparedness parade. May 
we of Japan and of America not cooperate to 
sweep from the surface of the earth these 
atrocious crimes of murder and carnage by our 
persistent will?" 

Mr. Suzuki extended to the Convention an 
invitation to be represented at the fifth anni- 
versary of the founding of the Laborers' Friend- 
ly Society of Japan, to be held in Tokio next 
spring. 

Tin invitation was accepted and the Executive 
Council was authorized to select a trade-unionist 
lo visit Japan as the representative of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Labor, and give to 
the newly-organized workers of that country a 
mess. I'm of encouragement and good will, also 

to urge upon them to keep up tin work of or- 
ganizing along trade-union lines and thus help 
to solve the great problems confronting the 
working (lass in America and Japan. 

In ibis connection it is interesting to note 
that three different resolutions were inl 

by as many delegates with rcfcrcnri t,> the 

iii on. One of those three 

resolutions, endorsing the work of the Anti- 
Japanese Laundry League, and favoring an ex- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



tension of the Chinese Exclusion Act so as to 
cover all Asiatics, was endorsed. The other 
two resolutions, dealing with organizing of 
Asiatic workers now in America, were referred 
to the Executive Committee for investigation 
and report to the next Convention. 

As the net result of the Convention's action 
the position of the California State Federation 
of Labor on the Asiatic question is this: It 
will do all within its power to promote the wel- 
fare of Asiatics in their own countries but at 
the same time the Federation will oppose fur- 
ther immigration of Asiatics to America. 

The following resolutions of particular in- 
terest to members of the Seamen's unions were 
introduced by your delegates and unanimously 
adopted by the Convention: 

Compensation for Seamen. 

"Whereas, The California Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act has been variously interpreted 
as to its application to seamen; and 

"Whereas, There is no good reason why sea- 
men as a class should not receive the same pro- 
tection under this legislation as is accorded to 
other wage-earners; therefore be it 

"Resolved, By the Seventeenth Annual Con- 
vention of the California State Federation of 
Labor, that we favor any necessary amendments 
to the existing California law which will guar- 
antee the full payment of compensation to sea- 
men and their dependents." 

La Follette Seamen's Act Upheld. 

"Whereas, The La Follette Seamen's Act was 
passed in answer to an insistent public demand 
for legislation protecting the traveling public 
against the evils of undcrmanning and ineffi- 
cient manning of vessels and against the lack of 
proper life-saving equipment, which have been 
the direct causes of the awful loss of human 
life in recent shipwrecks; and also for legisla- 
tion giving the seamen the same degree of per- 
sonal freedom enjoyed by all other American 
citizens; and 

''Whereas, All the provisions of said act re- 
specting manning and life-saving equipment and 
applicable to all foreign vessels touching at 
American ports as well as vessels of American 
registry, thus placing the vessels of all nationali- 
ties upon a basis of absolute equality, so far as 
the same can be done by legislation; therefore 
be it 

"Resolved, By the California State Federation 
of Labor, in seventeenth annual convention as- 
sembled, that the La Follette Seamen's Act 
should not be amended, repealed, or weakened 
in any manner, but should be rigidly enforced 
and strengthened if necessary; be it further 

"Resolved, That the officers of the Federation 
be instructed to assist in any manner possible 
to accomplish the purpose of this resolution." 

The delegates from the Alaska Fishermen's 
Union introduced four resolutions, all of which 
were adopted. The fishermen's resolutions fol- 
low, in full: 

Regulation of Gill-nets. 

"Whereas, Hon. John I. Nolan introduced in 
the first session of the Sixty-fourth Congress a 
bill known as H. R. 12029, which provides for 
Government regulation of gill-nets used in the 
waters of Bristol Ray. Alaska, for catching red 
salmon, provided that it shall be unlawful to use 
a mesh in these waters of less than live and 
three-quarter inches stretched measure mesh, 
in order that the great red salmon industry in 
Bristol Bay may not be destroyed; and 

"Whereas, Said bill (H. R. 12029) was not at 
the final adjournment of the Sixty-fourth Con- 
gress reported out of the Committee on Mer- 
chant Marine and Fisheries, to which committee 
it had been referred; therefore be it 

"Resolved, By the Seventeenth Annual Con- 
vention of the California State Federation of 
Labor, in regular session assembled, that the 
Secretary is hereby instructed to prepare and 
present to the proper Government officials peti- 
tions setting forth the absolute necessity of such 
a measure by Congress if the great red salmon 
industry in aforementioned waters is to be pre- 
served; and be it further 

"Resolved, That this matter be brought be- 
fore the Convention of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor by our delegate, and that copies 
of this resolution be sent to the various affiliated 
unions with request that they use their best 
efforts with their respective representatives in 
Congress tending towards immediate favorable 
action on said bill (H. R. 12029)." 

Hospital Ship for Bering Sea. 

"Whereas, There has been, for a long time, 
a United States hospital ship on duty on the 
Atlantic Coast for the care and cure of sick or 
injured fishermen; and 

"Whereas, The number of deep sea codllshers 
and other fishermen in Alaskan waters is large 
and their calling an unusually dangerous one 
because of the nature of those seas; now, there- 
fore, be it 

"Resolved, By the Seventeenth Annual Con- 
vention of the California State Federation of 
Labor, that the Government of the United 
States of America should install and maintain 
in Bering Sea a Government hospital ship for 
the care and cure of all sick or injured fisher- 
men in that vicinity; and be it further 

"Resolved, That the Secretary of this Federa- 
tion is hereby authorized and instructed to pre- 
pare and present to the proper Government offi- 
cials memorials and petitions which will clearly 



and forcibly prove the necessity of such action 
on the part of the Government; and be it 
further 

"Resolved, That this matter lie brought before 
the Convention of the American federation of 
Labor by the Federation'- delegate, with re- 
quest that the legislative body of the American 
Federation of Labor use all possible efforts to 
secure the installment of a hospital ship as 
herein requested." 

Hospital for Bristol Bay Region. 

"Whereas, The urgent need of a Government 
hospital in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska is 
greatly felt by every one engaged in the Alas- 
kan fishing industry, and especially by the 
Alaska- Fishermen's Union, many of whose 
members have suffered great hardships in past 
seasons through lack of proper medical atten- 
tion at the canneries and fishing grounds; and 

"Whereas, It is a matter of vital importance 
to upwards of ten thousand men who arc en- 
gaged in the fishing industry in Alaska that 
such a hospital be established as soon as possible 
and that immediate steps be taken to secure 
the proper presentation of this matter to the 
Congress of the L T nited States at its coming 
session; therefore be it 

"Resolved, By the Seventeenth Annual Con- 
vention of the California State Federation of 
Labor, that the Secretary is hereby instructed to 
prepare, and present to the proper Government 
officials, such memorials and petitions as will 
present the matter forcibly and clearly to them; 
and be it further 

"Resolved, That this matter be brought be- 
fore the approaching ("(invention of tin- Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, by the Federation's 
delegate thereto, and that copies of this reso- 
lution be sent to the various affiliated unions, 
with the request that they cooperate with us and 
use their best efforts to secure the establishment 
of such hospital." 

Fishermen Under the Seamen's Act. 

"Whereas, The protection of our fishe 
should be of as much importance to the Gov- 
ernment of the United States as the protection 
of any other class of laborers; now, therefore, 
be it 

"Resolved, By the Seventeenth Annual Con- 
vention of the California State Federation of 
Labor that all laws of the United States 
applicable to steam vessels of the merchant 
marine of one hundred tons burden or over, and 
made for the health, safety, or protection 67 
life, or from personal injury of the crew of said 
iss<!s, should be made applicable to all fishing 
Is of the United States of one hundred 
tons burden or more, including Federal inspec- 
tion of said fishing vessels, exempting however, 
therefrom the physical examination, as set forth 
in section 13 of the Act of March 4th, 1915; 
and be it further 

"Resolved, That copies of this resolution be 
sent to the California Congressional delegation, 
with the request that they cooperate in getting 
Congress to amend the present navigation laws 
to this end: and be it further 

"Resolved, That the delegate elected from 
this body to attend the convention of the 
American Federation of Labor is instructed to 
introduce a similar resolution before that body 
calling upon the American Federation of Labor 
to take similar action instructing its legislative 
committee to use its utmost efforts in securing 
changes of the navigation laws of the United 
States of America as herein sought." 

Summary of Other Resolutions. 

A total of 49 resolutions dealing with many 
subjects and matters were introduced and acted 
upon by the Convention. Among these were 
the following, which should be noted: 

The action of the paper trust in raising the 
price of paper, which is working a great hard- 
ship on newspaper publishers and causing much 
unemployment among printers, was roundly de- 
nounced in a resolution calling for an investi- 
gation of the paper trust by the Federal Trade 
Commission. Similar action was taken by the 
State Typographical Conference then in session 
at Eureka. 

The Convention pledged its moral support to 
the miners of Amador county, who are on 
strike for an increase of 25 cents per day in 
wages, and the same action was taken in the 
case of the culinary workers on strike in San 
Francisco. The Executive Board was instructed 
to issue an appeal for financial assistance for 
the culinary workers of San Francisco. 

The Convention also instructed the Executive 
Board to meet upon adjournment of the Con- 
vention and devise ways and means for bring- 
ing about a settlement between the Musicians' 
Union and the Native Sons of the Golden West. 
against which a boycott is now being prose- 
cuted. 

A minimum wage of $3 per day for laborers 
employed by the State either directly or on 
contract work was advocated. 

The Federation will endeavor to organize the 
employees of the Crockett Sugar Company, and 
will also assist the White Rats Actors' Union 
in organizing the theaters of California. 

An effort will be made to get a State law 
enacted which will prohibit the photographing 
of men and women arrested, before they have 
been convicted. 

The convention by unanimous vote endorsed 



the proposition to have free text books issued 
to the students of the high schools of Califor- 
nia, and will work with the State Typographical 
Conference in trying to secure the necessary 
legislation at the coming session of the State 
I .rgislature. 

Support was promised to the Longshoremen's 
Unions at San Pedro and Eureka. 

The convention went on record in favor of 
giving the Milk Wagon Drivers' Union juris- 
diction over all men and women employed in 
and around milk depots and dairies. The dele- 
gate to the American Federation of Labor will 
be instructed to introduce a resolution to this 
effect in the Baltimore convention. 

Attitude on Preparedness. 

By unanimous vote the convention again ex- 

d "unalterable opposition to war and to all 

forms of military preparedness which are liable 

to develop a military spirit in our people or to 

involve our nation in war." 

It was emphasized that real preparedness 
should mean industrial rather than military pre- 
paredness. The real and vital preparedness slo- 
gan of the organized workers should be: Edu- 
n, Organization and Federation. 
The convention also by unanimous vote de- 
clared that if it is found necessary for any of 
our unions, affiliated councils, or our Executive 
Committee to formulate plans for co-operative 
mercantile, contracting or manufacturing indus- 
tries, that the same meets with our approval and 
support. Preparedness, ultimately, may mean 
that Labor will find it necessary to enter into its 
own business of giving employment to our mem- 
bers, and if such a condition arises in the city 
of San Francisco or other sections of the State, 
requiring that our activities be directed toward 
co-operative manufacturing or mercantile fields 
as well as the industrial, we heartily commend 
such a course of action. 

The convention decided to appeal to the 
unions of the State for funds with which to in- 
sure a fair trial for the men indicted in the pre- 
paredness parade bomb cases. This was done 
upon recommendation of the Committee on Res- 
olutions, which declared that "upon the evi- 
submitted." On the other hand, the corn- 
defendants are innocent of the crimes with which 
they are charged; that the jury system has 
failed in the case of Billings; that the verdict in 
filings case was not warranted by the evi- 
dence submitted. On the other hand, the com- 
mittee's report declared "that these are not labor 
cases and that no one is attempting to make 
them labor cases, and that the cases arc not part 
of a general conspiracy against labor." This re- 
port was adopted with only eight delegates 
voting against it. 

Election of Officers. 
Daniel C. Murphy, president of the San Fran- 
cisco Labor Council and head of the Allied 
Printing Trades Council of San Francisco, was 
unanimously elected president. 

Daniel P Ilaggerty of San Francisco, retiring 
president, was elected delegate to the annual 
convention of the American Federation of Labor, 
to be held in Baltimore next month. 

Practically all other office rs were re-elected 
for another term. 

Sacramento was chosen as the next conven- 
tion city. 

I luring our stay at Eureka we were splendidly 
entertained by the trade-unionists and citizens. 
Altogether, except in one single debate, the 
work of the convention was carried on in a fra- 
ternal and harmonious spirit. 

Your delegates believe that this spirit, together 
with the Federation's splendid record of achieve- 
ments, speaks well for the future of the Califor- 
nia labor movement. 

Fraternally, 

I. X. HYLEN, 
BROR NELSON, 
HERMAN' TWEDT, 
MARK FLYNN, 
Delegates, Alaska Fishermen's Union. 

11 \RRY POTHOFF, 
Delegate, Marine Cooks and Stewards' 
Association of the Pacific Coast. 
PATRICK FLYNN, 
ANDREW PRYAL, 
WILLIAM MEEHAN, 
JOHN CLARK. 
Delegates. Marine Firemen, Oilers and 
Watertenders' Union of the Pacific. 
OTTO DITTMAR, 
E. A. ERICKSON, 
HARRY OHLSEN, 
GEO. F. STE \DM AN, 
PAUL SCHARRENBERG, 
Delegates, Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 



The tendency of trade unions, as of other 
bodies of men, to act upon sentiment rather 
than reason, would be more dangerous than 
it is, were it not for the intervention of 
that strongest of all forces, instinct. 



I Uware of being unconventional. In a 
world where chains are fashionable it is 
disgraceful to appear without them. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Favors Eight-Hour Law. 

"The railroad chiefs of the country were 
not opposed to the eight-hour day, contrary 
to the opinion that has prevailed through- 
out the country," said President F. D. 
Underwood, of the Erie Railroad, at Mil- 
waukee, in an interview in a Milwaukee 
paper. 

"There is a general feeling that the eight- 
hour day is coming, and no doubt it will 
come, and it ought to come," he said. "The 
eight-hour day law will cost the Erie Rail- 
road $3,000,000 a year. I do not believe 
additional legislation is needed by Congress 
on this question. 

"The Interstate Commerce Commission 
can take care of the raise in rates if 
any should be needed. Congress has set 
up the Interstate Commerce Commission 
to take care of railroad matters. If the 
commission could take care of both wages 
and rates, there would be no objection, 
because the commission is unquestionably 
honest and capable. 

"Mr. Wilson, however, was not playing 
politics. He was doing what he honestly 
believed was for the good of the country. 

"No one could associate with Mr. Wil- 
son, as the railroad men of the country 
did during these negotiations, and charge 
him with playing politics in any way. Only 
some newspapers charged the President 
worked for political effect." 



"Common Stock Water." 

Aladdin with his wonderful lamp was a 
piker at creating wealth compared with 
the United States Steel Corporation. In 
the sixteen years since its incorporation, 
the big steel combine has created $665,000,- 
000 out of nothing more than the power 
exercised by a virtual monopoly. 

When the corporation was formed it 
was established by Wall Street statisticians 
that total assets were $732,612,000. On 
that reckoning, not only was all of the 
$508,202,000 of common stock water, but 
$142,405,000 of the preferred as well. 

All of this fictitious wealth has been 
transformed into real cash, on which users 
of iron and steel will be forced to pay 
tribute forever. 

Wall Street responded to Maine election 
returns by sending this stock to a new 
high record of 105^. Four years after the 
company began business its common stock 
sold at 8y s . 

In 1904, when steel was at its lowest 
point, the total common stock, par value 
$508,302,000, was appraised by the stock 
market as being worth just $42,544,000. At 
the price to-day this same issue was rated 
at over $550,000,000. 



Drove Agents Out. 

More than twenty-five strikebreaking 
agents, who were at Philadelphia gathering 
up men to send to New York to operate 
the cars, were virtually driven from the 
city by officials of the State Department 
of Labor and Industry. None of them 
had a State license, as is required by law, 
and when the State officials were advised 
of that fact prompt action was taken and 
instructions given to arrest them. As 



soon as the agents got wind of the decision 
of the department, they got out of the city. 
So great was their hurry that some of 
them left their papers and clothing in 
their hc'?l rooms. An official of the 
Department of Labor and Industry said : 

"We propose to prosecute them to the 
limit. They won't be let off witih fines, 
but we'll press for jail terms. In the 
last few weeks six of such agents were 
arrested for operating without licenses. 
This city seems to be a favorite place for 
these men, who ply their trade unscrupu- 
lously, and many times send workers to 
distant points and then leave them 
stranded." 



Few Immigrants Coming. 

Immigration into the United States is 
still at a low ebb, and, while increasing to 
some extent, is still far below figures of 
the period before the European war. 

Figures just given out at the Depart- 
ment of Labor show immigration into this 
country of aliens for the period August 1 
to September 8, was 47,431. This is an 
increase of about 25 per cent, from the 
immigration of the same period in 1915. 

On the other hand, it is still below 1914 
figures, and vastly below those of 1913. 
For the same corresponding period in 1913, 
the number af aliens arriving at all ports 
in this country was 184,632. The chief in- 
creases this year over last are from Greece, 
Mexico, Portugal and Spain. 

Although there is an increase this August 
over last, the rate of increase is not enough 
to give promise of getting the total back 
anywhere near figures before the war in the 
near future. Before the war, the annual 
arrival of aliens was running well above a 
million a year. For the fiscal year 1916 it 
dropped to below 300,000, the lowest figure 
in many years. 



Oppose Controlled Labor. 

The United Mine Workers' Journal op- 
poses legislation that would compel em- 
ployes to work pending investigation of 
grievances. The Canadian Industrial Dis- 
putes Investigation Act, which prohibits 
strikes and lockouts in public utilities be- 
fore a Government board is appointed, is 
referred to as follows : 

"Our experience with the Canadian law 
has been that it is generally effective in 
curbing the workers from exercising their 
economic power through organized resist- 
ance, while it is utterly helpless to curb 
the employers when they seek to oppress, 
even by denying the fundamental rights of 
the workers. 

"A case in point — the Vancouver Island 
strike ; in spite of the fact that the board 
appointed under the Trades Dispute Act 
fully justified the position of the miners, 
the managers refused to abide by the de- 
cision and were furnished every legal and 
extra-legal aid to break the resistance of 
the workers. 

"In cases where the decision of such an 

arbitrarily constituted board went against 

the workers, and they refused to abide by 

such decision, even the commonest safc- 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bld^g., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundabcrg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Picters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufcr 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicate des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
l.eiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Camcros y Cocineros y Repostcros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboncros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandorcs, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguislas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Marltimo dos Emprcgados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Mm and Fishermen, 355 Point Road. 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's WorKers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



In a written answer recently to 
Sir John Harm I-Banner, Mr. Mc- 

Kenna, in the British House of Com- 
mons, said: I promised my honorable 

friend, in reply to liis question of 
June 26 last, to obtain the number 
of weekly wage earners who, dur- 
ing the quarter concluded July 5, 
1916, were in receipt of wages ex- 
ceeding £2 10s. a week. The cpm- 
missioners of inland revenue have 
summarized the statistics available in 
the various tax districts throughout 
the country, and these indicate an 
approximate figure of 1. 151), (KID such 
wage earners, in receipt of some 

tJ4.S,000,000 for the quarter, or an 
average per head of 3 guineas a 
week. It is, <>f course, too early 
to state the amount of income tax 
which will be found to be due for 
the quarter or the number of wage 
earners who will be liable. My honor- 
able friend will not forget that, in 
common with other taxpayers, the 
weekly wage earners are entitled to 
claim abatement, children's allow- 
ance, life insurance, etc. 

The Australian Interstate Unions' 
Congress recently sat at Ilobart, 
Tasmania. A proposal was made 
urging the amendment of section 40, 
subsection 1, of the existing arbitra 
tion act, so as to direct that the 
president of the arbitration court 
shall (instead of may l award prefer- 
ence to unionists on the application 
of a claimant organization. The feel- 
ing of the conference was thai ab- 
solute preference to unionists should 
be made statutory, but it was urged 
that owing to the limited powers un- 
der the Commonwealth constitution 
the word "shall" would, at the pres- 
ent time, work mischief rather than 
good. Eventually tin- following 
amendment was agreed to: "That 
this congress emphatically claims 
that, in the interests of industrial 
justice, the federal arbitration acts 
should contain the provision for ab- 
solute preference to unionists, and 
therefore requests that the federal 
labor government will press forward 
with the amendment of the federal 
constitution, to enable the enactment 
of same." It was resolved, "That 
the Federal Parliament fix the mini- 
mum wage and the maximum work- 
ing week for all workers." 

The British Board of Trade, acting 
under the powers conferred by the 
military service act, 1916, have issued 
general certificates to the effect that 
work of certain kinds at ports in 
Great Britain is work of national 
importance. As some misunderstand- 
ing has arisen as to the effect of this 
action, attention is drawn to the fact 
that no individual employed in such 
work is thereby exempted from mili- 
tary service unless he holds an in- 
dividual certificate of exemption is- 
sued by the board of trade. These 
individual certificates are issued by 
the board of trade in the ports where 
this procedure appears to be neces- 
sary on the advice of representative 

Port Labor committees set up in 
the ports. In the Port of London 
the London Shipowners and trans- 
port Workers Military Service com- 
mittee acts as the Port Labor com- 
mittee. Applications for exemption 
on personal grounds are dealt with 
not by Port Labor committees, but 
by the local tribunals. The issue 
of the general certificate by the 
board of trade is a formality neces- 
sary to permit of the subsequent 
issue of the individual certific; 
which alone give exemption. 



CANNON ® BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON STREETS .... SAN PEDRO 



HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS phone is? j 

NATIONAL HOTEL 

MRS. ALBERT H. RYAN. Prop. 

FURNISHED ROOMS 

50c Per Day and Up — $2 Per Week and Up 
No. 270 FOURTH STREET SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



REMOVAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 



S. G. SWANSON 



for 
the 



BEST isTn" 



TAILORING 



Less the 
Fancy Price 



who has been established since 1904 on Beacon Street, between 6th and 7th 

IS NOW located on the 2nd floor BANK OF SAN PEDRO BLDG., 
entrance 110 WEST 6th STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL., 

Where he Is better prepared, because of Much lesser rent, to give the trade the 
advantage of lower prices and as formerly, special rare Is given to garments en- 
trusted to him for Cleaning, Repairing and Pressing. 

Note — Clothes also cut, trimmed and made from your own cloth with the 
Union Label too. The new woolens are now ready for your Inspection, how about 
your order? 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



Mills, Elbert & Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 
FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers In — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 



San Franciac*. 



Bergman. John Johnsen, Aug. 

Blom. Ernest Konig, D. 

Christiansen, Anton Nielsen, Harold 

Christiansen, A. Olander, Ed 

Doris. Geo. Thomson, John 
Eckart, T. G. 



A SAILOR'S BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA- FARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, the bank 

carries on hand at all times an ample supply of Swedish, Norwegian 

and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. bafik notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 
Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Edstrom, alias Brynjulf Ed- 
strom, born in Norway in 1879, was 
last heard from at Mobile, Ala., 
where his address was Norwegian 
Chapell, is inquired for. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify his mother. Address, 22 Pile- 
stradet, Kristiania, Norway. — 12-22-15 

George Alexander Sharman, a na- 
tive of Brooklyn, N. Y. About 28 
years of age, height 5 feet 9 inches, 



\ supposed to have sailed on the Great 
Lakes in 1907, is inquired for by 
M. L. Kinvan, 1211 Mosher street, 
Baltimore, Md. 7-14-15 

Olai Ingebrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Niels Ingebrigtsen, 
469— 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Stcuart street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 8-4-15 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Acne, T. Michaelsen, Andrew 

Andersen, John Maurice, Francois 

Andersson. Oskar Muller, Henry 

Bergman, Leo McNeal, John 

Button, Roswell Makela, N. 

Besly, C. Malm, Gustaf 

Brien. Hans Nilsen, Nils E. 

Bro, Emll Nilsen, Oskar 

Bentsen, Hans B. Nilsen. Oskar J. 

Bushman. John Olsen, J. P. 

Cooley, H. Orling, Gust 

Christophersen. C. Owen, Fred 

Carlson, Harry Pedersen, Alf 

Carlson. Gustaf Pelz, Fritz 

William Petrow, A. 

Dahlstrom, G. Peterson, H. -1064 

Edlund, Konrad Pintz, Johan 

Franke, Chas. Peterson, Hugo 

Fiellman. Jonas Patterson. C. V. 

Fugelutsen. Thor Pakki, Emll 

Fjellman, Karl Pederson, Ole 

k. Bernhard Rickman, Herman 

Walter Ryden, Oskar 

Grigolelt, E. Roe, Victor 

■1'iirg, Martin Robertson, A. 

Redman, John M. Rush, Charlie 

Horlln, Ernest Ries, J. H. 

Henricksen. H. C. Raun, Einar 

Hedlund, Olaf Rudd. Walter 

lie, Henry Skaanes, Egil 

ITolmstrom. Fritz Sjoblom, G. A. 

Haupt, Fritz Sprogue, Th. 

Hansen, Charley Stenberg. Alfred 

Hansen. Ole Svennlngsen. S. N. 

Hoversen, Carl Simpson, L. C. 

Jacobsen, Lars Samuolsson, Frank 

Johanson, John Smith. Johan 

Johnson, Jack Soderlund, Anton 

.lanson. Oscar Schmidt. Louritz P. 
Johnsson, J. A. -1659Strom. C. L. 

Johanson, Victor Sandblom, Konrad 

KbifT. N. Thorsen, Carl 

Kallas M. Tf-nnisen, Andrew 

Kolodzle, George Ullman. Axel 

Karnup, Edward Uhllg. Richard 

Kalllo, Anton T'lappa, Kosti 
Lundqulet. Abraham Welsen. Julius (Reg. 
Laatzen, H. Letter) 

Lindeman. Gust Wischkar, Ernst 

Lnrcnz, Bruno Wlkman, P. 

I. ul7.cn. Waldemar White. Robert 

Larson. Max Warkkala. John 
Lindberg, Ernst Newspapers and 

T.oidpkPr. Elith Packages. 

Martin, John B. Schmidt, Lauritz P. 



Honolulu, H. T. 

Anderson. John E. Nelsen, C. F. 

Burk. Harrv -1284 Petersen. Carl 

Grant] v. C. W. Peters, Walter 

Eugenio, John Relther, Fritz 

Ekelund, Rlckhard Solberg, B. P. 

Ivertsen. Sigvald B. Strand, Conrad 

Lengwenus, W. I* Thompson. Emll N. 
MSller, F. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anders C. Anderson, a native of 
Norway, who left his personal effects 
at Port San Luis, Cal., after leaving 
a ship at that place, is inquired for. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify D. R. Jacks, Deputy 
Collector of Customs, Port San Luis, 
Cal. 12-22-15 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July, 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St. 8-11-15 

Olof Pedersen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 60, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify J. T. 
Miles, 761 Greenwich St., New York, 
N. Y. 2-16-16 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Peter Murphy, better known as 
Boatswain McGann, will kindly notify 
Patrick Kieran, 58 Commercial St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 4-19-16 

Vencelus Durbich is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please communicate with 
Gerolamo Durbich, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 7-28-15 

John Seaberg, No. 2890, a native 
of Russia, age 30, and a member of 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, is 
inquired for by his wife. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. H. Seaberg, Gen. Del., Sac- 
ramento, Cal. 8-30-16 

Will John Baumeister, member of 
the Sailors' Union, will call at the 
office and receive a letter waiting for 
him there. 

Edward Beahan, a native of Cali- 
fornia, supposed to be sailing on the 
Lakes, is inquired for by his brother, 
J. J. Beahan, 2003 Chestnut street, 
Oakland, Cal. 5-10-16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Advices from Eureka indicate that the damage 
to the wrecked steamer "Bear" by last week's 
storm was fully as extensive as had been feared 
and hope of floating the "Bear" is practically 
abandoned. 

The number of ships passing through the 
Canal in seagoing or commercial service in" Au- 
gust was 142. In April, 1916, following the re- 
sumption of traffic on April 15, the number of 
ships through the Canal was 80; in May, it was 
129; in June, 124; and in July, 149. 

The Seattle Construction & Dry Dock Com- 
pany, a subsidiary of Todd Shipyards Corpora- 
tion of New York, will soon build a floating 
dry dock to cost between $400,000 and $500,000. 
The dock will have a tonnage capacity of 12,000 
and will be the largest of its kind on the 
Pacific coast. 

According to reports from Seattle men of the 
salmon fleet received $202,141.49 during Septem- 
ber at the office of the United States Shipping 
Commissioner at pier 1, and $100,000 more was 
paid out to the crews of other vessels, including 
those engaged in the cod fishing and whaling. 
The money paid to the salmon fleet was divided 
among 600 men. 

The salvors are said to have given up the 
attempt to save the steamer "Bandon," which 
went ashore at Port Orford on September 1, 
according to a dispatch received by the marine 
department of the Chamber of Commerce. The 
dispatch said that wreckers were removing their 
gear. The vessel is still said to be in a float- 
ing condition if weather conditions remain mod- 
erate. 

F. M. Barry, who was general agent at San 
Francisco for the Pacific Coast Steamship Com- 
pany, has been appointed assistant manager of 
the new Pacific Steamship Company, with offices 
in San Francisco. It was also announced that 
Captain John F. Blain, assistant manager of the 
Pacific Coast Steamship Company, and R. D. 
Pinneo, assistant freight agent of the same com- 
pany, will not be taken over permanently by the 
new company. 

The tanker "Paulsboro" of the Vacuum Oil 
Company, which was launched at the Union Iron 
Works last August, steamed from San Francisco 
during the past week on her maiden voyage 
under command of Captain S. W. Chapman for 
London. She carries 70,000 barrels of oil. The 
ship is one of the finest of the modern tankers 
recently built at the Union Iron Works and her 
trial trips a week previous were entirely satis- 
factory to Captain Chapman. 

The burned steamer "Congress" entered Seattle 
harbor on October 5, having been run from 
Coos Bay under her own steam. The vessel 
caught fire off Marshfield, September 14, and 
was anchored while her passengers were taken 
off. The decks of the "Congress" are a mass 
of debris. The portholes are plugged with 
boards, covered with white canvas. After a 
survey the owners will decide whether to re- 
build the boat as a passenger carrier or 
freighter. 

Collector of the Port J. O. Davis has asked 
the Treasury Department when the funds for 
the purchase of a coast guard cutter to replace 
the ancient "Hartley" will be available. Con- 
gress appropriated $250,000 for new cutters for 
the service and $50,000 of the amount was to be 
spent for cutters at this port. The gasoline 
launch "Tango" has been found to be suitable 
for a boarding cutter on San Francisco bay and 
it is possible that she will be purchased as soon 
as the money is available. 

The steamer "Lewis Luckenbach" sailed from 
Victoria during the past week for Valparaiso 
with a cargo of coal shipped by the Western 
Fuel Company. It is the first time coal to any 
amount has been shipped from Pacific Coast 
ports to South America, according to shipping 
records. Australia heretofore has supplied the 
South American countries with coal when none 
was available there. Scarcity of shipping and 
increased consumption of coal in Australia are 
assigned as reasons for the shipment from here. 
The Seattle Shipbuilding Company was incor- 
porated on September 30 with a capital of $500,- 
000 by S. F. Racine and G. T. Morgan of Seattle, 
who said they represented Eastern capital which 
would erect here immediately a shipbuilding 
plant to construct 7000-ton steel ships. The 
plant, which will cover six acres, will lie ready 
for shipbuilding within sixty days, Racine said, 
but difficulty in obtaining steel will delay the 
construction of ships probablv thirty days more. 
Meanwhile the company will construct imme- 
diately one large wooden lumber schooner, for 
which a contract already has been obtained. 
When in full operation the plant will employ 
1000 men. 

That the number of vessels arriving and de- 
parting at San Francisco is steadily increasing is 
shown by the report of tonnage movements 
issued for the month of September by the marine 
department of the Chamber of Commerce. \n 
increase of 10 per cent, was made over the 
month of August and 25 per cent, over the 
month of September. 1915. Steam vessels regi 
tering a total of 529,263 tons and sailing ships 
registering 132,045 tons arrived here, and steam 



vessels registering 530,946 and sailing ships of 
78,826 tons departed from this port during the 
month of September. Of the vessels arriving, 
403,495 tons came from coast ports and 239,830 
tons came from foreign ports. Of the depar- 
tures 392,695 tons cleared for coast ports and 
162,297 tons for foreign ports. 

There will be no merger of the San Francisco 
and Portland Steamship Company, operating, the 
"Beaver" and "Rose City," with the newly- 
formed Pacific Steamship Company, headed by 
H. F. Alexander of Tacoma, according to J. D. 
Farrell of Portland, president of the first men- 
tioned company, who arrived at the Palace Hotel 
last week. Farrell, who is accompanied by his 
family, said he was here on a pleasure trip, and 
denied rumors that he is to confer with Presi- 
dents Sproule of the Southern Pacific and Calvin 
of the Union Pacific regarding the car situation. 
"1 have car shortage troubles enough in Oregon 
without coming to California to worry about 
them," he said. "As to steamships, we have no 
notion of selling or combining, and no negotia- 
tions are on." 

The licenses of Captain John Benediktson, 
master of the steam-schooner "Carlos," and 
First Officer John Allison of the steamer 
"Coquille River," were suspended during the 
week by United States Inspectors of Steam- 
boats James Guthrie and Joseph Dolan. Cap- 
tain Bencdiktson's ticket is denied to him for 
a period of fifteen days for the failure to record 
in the log drills with the life-saving guns of 
the "Carlos." Regulations demand that such a 
drill must be held at least once in three months 
and be recorded in the log book. Allison was 
given a suspension of thirty days as a result of 
the collision between the "Coquille River" and 
the "City of Topeka" on August 14, north of 
Point Reyes, during a thick fog. Allison was 
on watch at the time of the accident. 

A beautiful silver cup, presented by the British 
Government, and a letter of praise from Secre- 
tary of Commerce William C. Redfield await 
Captain George H. Cook and the crew of the 
American steamer "Camino" at the office of 
Shipping Commissioner Walter Macarthur. The 
cup and letter were received by Macarthur 
from Secretary Redfield, with instructions to make 
the presentation to Captain Cook and the crew 
of the vessel as soon as they arrive in port. 
Captain Cook and the crew of the "Camino" 
rescued the officers and crew of the British 
steamer "Ross" on April 25, after the vessel had 
been torpedoed by a German submarine in the 
South Atlantic. In saving the men from the 
submarine vessel Captain Cook imperiled his 
own vessel and his crew displayed much valor 
and bravery in rescuing the men from the .sea. 
In its September 6 issue the Panama Canal 
Record publishes a list of the lines which 
have established regular or approximately regu- 
lar services through the canal since the re- 
sumption of traffic in April. The list includes 
four services from the Atlantic terminus to 
South and Central America, one ^from the At- 
lantic terminus to Central and North America, 
three from the Atlantic coast of the Linked 
States to the Pacific coast pf South America, 
four services from Europe to the Pacific coast 
of South America, four from Europe to the 
west coast of North America, nine from the 
Atlantic coast of the United States to Japan, 
Siberia, China, and the Philippine Islands, six 
from the Atlantic coast of the United States to 
Australia and New Zealand, and two from 
Europe to Australia and New Zealand. 

There has been a sharp decline in transpacific 
freight rates within the past two months and at 
the present writing rates comparable with those 
obtained previous to the war have been quoted. 
General business slackness in the Far East, 
due to some extent to the high value of silver 
exchange, which prevents the sale of Chinese 
products abroad to advantage, has resulted in a 
marked decrease in the movement of produce. 
As usual under such circumstances, the sub- 
sidized Japanese lines have cut rates. Several 
large tram]) steamers have come into the market 
for cargoes, and additional tonnage has been 
offered from other sources. The result has been 
a general collapse in rates eastward, which is 
likely to obtain until some of the tonnage 
now in service on the Pacific is transferred 
to other routes and until a change in the silver 
situation permits a renewal of active export 
to the United States and Canada. Rates from 
Hongkong and China ports to the United 
States and Canadian overland common points 
at the present time are open and competitive. 
The China coast Freight situation is completely 
demoralized. Chartering is slow and it is likely 
that it will be some time before there will be a 
readjustment in accordance with freight con- 
ditions in other parts of the world. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1Y 2 A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md WALTER LESCH, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY GUSTAV H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

41 Loyalls Lane 

NEWPORT, Va OSWALD RATHLEV, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. MOLLERSTADT, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WILLY MULLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Texas JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 
Broad. 

New York Branch, 514 Greenwich St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 228 Lafayette St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 164 Eleventh Ave. 
Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 181 Fulton St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 231 Dock St. 
NEW YORK CITY, 164 Eleventh Ave. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW York CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 202 Atlantio Ave. 



F. R. WAT.L, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., ^hird Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 328-332 West Randolph St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
Branches: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast 


Seamen' 


s J 


ournal 


Published weekly at San Francisco 




BY THE 






SAILOR'S UNION OF 


THE 


PACIFIC 




Established in 


1887 





PAUL SCHARBENBERG Editor 

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Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
Maritime Building, 59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
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of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY; OCTOBER 11. 1916. 



JAPANESE-AM BRICAN RELATIONS. 



While the Hearsts and their ilk are cry- 
ing for more big guiis and still "bigger" 
battleships to protect our shores against a 

Japanese invasion which they say is bound 
to come, sooner or later, the workers of 
both countries are beginning to take things 
in their hands and are commencing to solve 
their own problems in their own way. 

Last year's convention of the California 
State Federation of Labor, for the first time 
in history, seated two fraternal delegates 
representing a small group of organized 
workers in Japan. In admitting these Japa- 
nese to the Councils of Labor no change 
in policy was necessary. Nowhere, except 
in the minds of professional politicians and 
journalistic jingoes, was it suggested that 
the seating of these delegates affected the 
attitude or modified the demand of organ- 
ized American labor for the exclusion of all 
Asiatic laborers from our shores. These 
delegates from Japan were welcomed be- 
cause it is in accordance with the tenets of 
international unionism and certainly to the 
direct advantage of American unionism to 
aid and encourage the working people in 
Japan to organize and better their con- 
ditions. 

A year has passed and one of the two 
Japanese delegates w-ho was in attendance 
at last year's convention has again crossed 
the Pacific and was again accorded the 
privilege of the floor at the State Federa- 
tion of Labor convention. 

Delegate Suzuki reported splendid prog- 
m organizing the workers of his native 
land. He said the toilers of Japan had been 
inspired by the message of good will from 
America and had resolved to follow the 
example of American workers and improve 
their own standard by organized self-help. 
But the delegate from Japan brought an- 
other message. It was in the nature of a 
request to send a trade-unionist fraternal 
delegate from California to the fifth anni- 
versary of the Laborers' Friendly Society 
in Japan, to be held in Tokio next spring. 

The reason for the unanimous acceptance 



of this imitation and the general attitude 
of the organized workers in California to- 
ward their fellow workers in Japan are con- 
cisely set forth in the resolution upon this 
subject, as adopted by the convention: 

Whereas, The organized labor movement of 
California and of America stands ever ready to 
assist the workers of every country, color and 
creed, to emancipate themselves from exploita- 
tion ; and 

Whereas, It lias been necessary at times for 
the working class of this country to protect their 
standard of living by favoring the exclusion of 
foreign competition, in the spirit alone of im- 
perative necessity and self-protection: and 

Whereas, We have learned, with interest and 
gratification, that the workers of Japan are or- 
ganizing into industrial unions for their own 
welfare — a movement we can endorse: therefore 
be it 

Resolved, By the Seventeenth Annual Convcn- 
( the California State Federation of I 
that we give to -Mr. Suzuki, the fraternal dele- 
gate from the Laborers' Friendly Society of 
Japan, our expression of good will and a mes- 
sage of hope and encouragement for a brighter 
future to the working class of his country: and 
be it further 

Resolved, That, in assuming this position of a 
greater friendship between the workers of the 
East and the West, we must continue our un- 
swerving stand upon exclusion until such time a- 
immigration will not prove a menace to our own 
unions, our working people and our standard of 
living; and be it further 

Resolved, That the question of sending a fra- 
ternal delegate from this body to the labor con- 
vention in Japan be referred to the Executive 
Committee of this Federation, with the hope that 
a delegate can be selected to carry a mi 

iod will and encouragement to the laboring 
class of Japan. 

Additional comment upon American- 
Japanese working class relations seems 
wholly unnecessary. However, if the ac- 
tion of the California State Federation of 
Labor furnishes any points to strengthen 
the arguments of bloodthirsty jingoes in 
either country we should be very glad in- 
deed to hear from them. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Dear old San Francisco always was and 
still is in a class of her own. 

To be sure she is "union ridden." She has 
her walking delegates and her business agents 
galore. But with all these impediments ( N J ) 
she has just pulled off a few stunts worth 
while recording. 

First, it has just developed that San Fran- 
cisco leads every city in the United States 
in comparison to its size on the increase of 
postal savings deposits since June. 

San Francisco's increase is registered at 
$200,339.06 in that time, while Chicago's 
gains only show $196,783. 

No non-union city can boast of such a 
record. And no labor crusher will dare to 
make this remarkable comparison an issue 
in a union-busting campaign. 

Second in line, but not in importance, is 
the current news item to the effect that one- 
sixth of all the steel ships now under way 
in the United States, for the merchant fleet, 
are being constructed in two yards on San 
Francisco bay, the Union Iron Works and 
Moore & Scott's yard at Oakland. This is 
the statement given out by the Bureau of 
Navigation. 

The Bureau's figures include all contracts 
taken to September 1. On that date the ton- 
nage being built in the Pacific Coast yards 
was : 

Tons. 

Union Iron Works, S. F 186,628 

Moore & Scott, Oakland 22,600 

J. F. Duthie & Co., Seattle 26,850 

Seattle Construe. & D. 1). Co 

Willamette I. & S. Wks., Portland t 

Total on Coast 321,278 

Total in United States 1,292,310 

The LTnion Iron Works is not only build- 



ing more merchant vessels than any other 
yard in the United States, but it has con- 
tracts ahead for a longer period of time than 
any other shipbuilding concern. 

< )f the contracts under way at the San 
Francisco yard, 145,428 tons will be delivered 
by June 30, 1917, and 41,200 tons will not be 
ready until after that date. 

The facts enumerated herein and the favor- 
able conditions described have been made pos- 
sible because San Francisco workers earn fair 
wages and have correspondingly more money 
to spend. 

Yet we have been told of late that San 
Francisco must be saved from the labor agi- 
tators. She must have "cheaper" labor. She 
must have more "free and independent" work- 
ers — men and women who will refuse to 
swear allegiance to the union of their craft — 
men and women who will work longer hours 
for shorter pay. 

Stripped to the bone, this is the essence of 
the program mapped out by the inner circle 
of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Will San Franciscans follow these bom- 
bastic misleaders and deliberately thrust this 
glorious city into merciless industrial war- 
fare? Or. what is equally as bad, will the 
citizens of this greatest of all municipalities 
sit idly by while these manicured conspira- 
tors in broadcloth scheme and plot to bring 
ruin to many and misery and suffering to 
all? 



STRAW VOTES. 



The current issue of the Literary Digest 
contains the results of a Presidential straw- 
vote taken among labor union presidents, 
secretaries, etc., in thirty-one States from 
coast to coast. 

According to the Digest "the initial strik- 
ing feature of the investigation is that out 
of 457 labor officials reporting. 332 say their 
members favor Mr. Wilson, 47 find their 
voters are for Mr. Benson, the Socialist can- 
didate, and 43 report sentiment favoring Mr. 
1 [ughes. The findings of 34 officials reveal 
either a non-committal attitude or sentiment 
"evenly divided.' " 

This surely does indicate a remarkable 
drift of labor votes toward Mr. Wilson. 

However, a recent California straw vote 
goes very much further in that direction than 
the nation-wide sweep predicted by the Lit- 
erarv Digest's test vote. Returning from 
Eureka on a southbound train, on Saturday, 
October 7, were exactly 156 trade-unionists 
who had represented their respective organ- 
izations at the annual convention of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Labor. A poll of 
this aggregation revealed the following as- 
tonishing results : 

For Wilson 145 

For Hughes 4 

For Benson 1 

Non-committal 6 

Total 156 

These returns indicate clearly that Califor- 
nia trade-unionists are not in sympathy with 
Mr. Hughes and his reactionary policies. 
The Seamen's Act may be weakened or modi- 
fied by a standpat Congress at the behest of 
a standpat President, but we shall at least 
have the satisfaction of knowing that the 
organized workers of California are fairly 
unanimous against those who would re- 
establish involuntary servitude among the 
toilers of the sea. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



CONTROL OF CONGRESS. 



All experienced political campaigners 
freely dwell upon the importance of giving 
to the next President a House and Senate 
of his own political faith. Presidents who 
find themselves without a working majority 
in Congress are deprived of the ability to 
give the country an administration in ac- 
cordance with their liking or of that of 
their parties. The hands of a number of 
Presidents have thus been bound, some- 
times during a part of their terms, some- 
times during the entire occupancy of the 
executive chair. It was one of the disap- 
pointments of Grover Cleveland's career 
that, in a critical period, he could not de- 
pend upon Congress to support him in 
putting through measures calculated to 
give expression to his ideas of government. 
Woodrow Wilson, the only other Demo- 
cratic President since the Civil War, has 
been more fortunate. While he has not 
succeeded in obtaining all the legislation 
he has sought, yet the Congresses he has 
been called upon to deal with have been 
with him politically, and partisan oppo- 
sition has not at any time seriously ham- 
pered him. 

The Senate in existence at the time of his 
inauguration contained fifty-one Repub- 
licans and forty-three Democrats, there 
being two vacancies ; but the Democrats 
soon came into control, and have held it 
ever since. The House in 1913 was com- 
posed of 229 Democrats, 161 Republicans, 
one Progressive Republican and one So- 
cialist. The Senate in the following year 
was composed of fifty-three Democrats, 
forty-two Republicans and one Progressive, 
while the House had 289 Democrats and 
only 128 Republicans. In this House the 
Progressives, owing to the defection of 
1912, increased to fifteen, and one seat was 
held by an independent. The present Con- 
gress, upon assembling, was composed of 
Fifty-six Democrats to thirty-nine Repub- 
licans in the Senate, showing a very con- 
siderable gain in that chamber, and of 232 
Democrats to 190 Republicans, showing a 
considerable loss for the former. 

This fall an entire new House of Repre- 
sentatives and thirty-three members of the 
Senate are to be elected. Of the Senators 
whose terms are expiring, eighteen are 
Democrats and fifteen are Republicans. 
During the last year the Republicans have 
gained one Senator, making their total 
number forty. To control the next Senate 
they must have forty-nine members. In 
other words, they must make a gain of 
nine, or elect twenty-four out of the thirty- 
three to be chosen. 

The Republicans, with a Republican 
President and a Democratic Congress, or 
with either a Democratic Senate or House, 
could not feel that the victory was com- 
plete. To reverse the Democratic party on 
the tariff, for instance, would demand com- 
plete control over the administrative and 
legislative branches of the government ; and 
let it not be forgotten that reversal of the 
Democratic tariff policy seems to be tin- 
principal objective of the Republican 
campaign. To reverse the Democratic party 
on any humanitarian issue, such as the 
Seamen's legislation, would of course re- 
quire much more than a Republican working 
majority, for many Republican Senators 
and Congressmen would refuse absolutely 
"to take program" in such a struggle. 



"REAL PREPAREDNESS." 



The Spokesman for the Committee on Real 

Preparedness Cites Facts Which Are 

Usually Suppressed. 



The Committee on Real Preparedness, of 
which Mr. Amos Pinchot is Chairman, is con- 
ducting a series of Conferences throughout the 
eastern half of the United States. Fourteen 
have already been held in industrial centers such 
as New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, 
Minneapolis and Pittsburg, and several more arc 
to be held this month in southern cities and in 
New England. Committees arc being organized 
in nearly every State of the Union to ask all 
candidates for Congress whether they favor and 
will, if elected, work for the following proposals 
of the Committee: 

Meeting the cost of local government by 
heavier taxation of land values and untaxing im- 
provements and all products of labor. Rapidly 
progressive taxation of large incomes, especially 
unearned incomes, to meet the cost of the Fed- 
eral Government; and a rapidly progressive in- 
heritance tax for Federal and State governments. 

Federal acquisition of all natural monopolies, 
the present owners to be paid only the value 
they have given thereto plus the present value 
of improvements therein and thereon. 

Social insurance against sickness and accidents. 

Benjamin C. Marsh, Executive Secretary of 
the Committee, who has spoken at all the Con- 
ferences, cites the following facts as showing 
the need for this fundamental program of pre- 
paredness for peace — and to prevent war: 

One-half of one per cent, of the population of 
the country receive nearly one-fifth of the na- 
tional income; 

At least 630,000 people in the country die un- 
necessarily every year; 

An overwhelming majority of our industrial 
population are more or less seriously impaired 
physically. Only about one-tenth of the appli- 
cants for enlistment in the United States Marine 
Corps in 1915 were accepted, and most of the re- 
jections were due to physical defections; 

About two-thirds of the country's population 
have no wealth, except the clothes on their back, 
and a little furniture or personal property. 

"An hereditary monarch," says Mr. Marsh, 
"with the slogan, 'After me the deluge,' could 
not have fostered conditions more inciting to 
revolution than obtain in our country." 

Organized labor has achieved well nigh a 
miracle in shortening hours of work and increas- 
ing the number of dollars paid the proportion of 
the workers of the country now organized. The 
future task is to keep present gains, but to raise 
the general well being of all workers. This in- 
volves two fundamental changes: 

1. Eliminating the raids government makes 
upon the earnings of the workers, through our 
present system of securing revenue for govern- 
mental purposes, which costs every ■ family in 
the country on the average about $180 a year. 
This can be done by the triple tax, urged by the 
Committee, on land values, on large inheritances 
and on large unearned incomes. 

2. Eliminating parasites who charge heavy 
prices for natural resources and services neces- 
sarily monopolistic in nature, such as transporta- 
tion and all public utility undertakings. This 
will be done by government acquisition thereof, 
as urged by this Committee, and cannot be done 
in any other way. As Mr. Delos F. Wilcox, 
Franchise Expert, points out, governmental reg- 
ulation of public utilities is a complete failure. 
These corporations now insist upon having reg- 
ulation. As Mr. Wilcox says: "They are so en- 
thusiastic over it that they help write the laws 
(creating Public Service Commissions) and ap- 
point the Commissioners." 

Government Ownership of Railroads Inevitable. 

"Government ownership of railroads very soon, 
is inevitable," says Mr. Marsh. "The only issue 
is as to the amount the Government shall pay 
for them. The present value of the railroads is 
around twenty billions of dollars. The total 
amount the railroads have paid _ for land for 
rights of way and terminals, which they have 
prudently invested, is probably about ten billions. 
The railroads want to be paid the present value. 
They are entitled to receive only the value they 
have given, and they have not given any of the 
increase in land values. The real estate of the 
Illinois Central cost that road two hundred thou- 
sand dollars. Tt was worth, in 1900, thirty-four 
million dollars. The Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission stated that the increase in land values 
of t he Burlington Railroad is estimated at $150,- 
000,000, and that the value of land owned by 
many railroads increased several hundred per 
cent, in a few years. That Commission remarked, 
in the case of Spokane vs. Northern Pacific 
Railway Co.: 'Whether railroads can demand a 
return not only upon the money which has 
been actually invested in these properties, but 
also upon this (land) value which has grown 
from almosl nothing to vast proportions without 
the expenditure of money, or the assumption ( Of 
risk, is a question of tremendous importance.' 

"The Supreme Court of the United States in 
the Minnesota Rate Cases, Mr. Justice I hi 
writing the decision, claimed they have, and that 
the railroads cannot be deprived of the present 
value of that property 'not the original cost' 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 9, 1916. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping medium. The Quarterly Finance 
Committee reported having examined the ac- 
counts of the Union and found same correct. 
Delegates to the California State Federation of 
Labor Convention submitted their report, which 
is printed in full in this issue of the Journal. 
JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 2, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

REGINALD TOWNSEND, Agent. 
Room 11, De Cosmos Block, i424 Government 

St. 

Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 2, 1916. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

Tacoma Agency, Oct. 2, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 2, 1916. 
Shipping good in offshore vessels. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 2, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

H. CHRISTENSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 2, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 2, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping dull. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
221 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 2. 1916. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg, Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 25, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal, Oct. 5, 1916. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m, Eugene Burke in the chair. Secre- 
tary reported shipping fair for waiters, slow for 
cooks. Nominations of delegates to the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union Convention and offi- 
cers for the ensuing term were proceeded with. 
EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 28, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 27, 1916. 
Shipping slow for cooks. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box No. 54. 



DIED. 

Wendell T. Gray, No. 1084, a native of New 

Brunswick, age 26, reported to have died in 

France. (Vancouver, B. C, report, Oct. 2, 1916.) 



Roosevelt, the swashbuckler, was mainly 
responsible for inflicting Mr. Taft upon the 
country. He guaranteed Mr. Taft's "pro- 
gressiveness" just as he does that of Can- 
didate Hughes. Can we afford to accept 
another bogus testimonial? 



Presidenl Wilson announces constructive 
plans; Mr. Hughes threatens us with war 
and one of those infamous old time Repub- 
lican tariffs. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE PLEDGE. 

Here's a pledge to you my brothers, 

\ pledge and a comrade's hand; 
By the roads we have built for the masters, 

By the rivers we have spanned; 
By the forge of our foundry prison, 

Where flesh is as cheap as gra 
My heart and my hand forever, 

For my <>\\n — the working das-! 

By the hungry seas we've conquered 

And strewn with our sailor dead; 
By the land we have bathed in life-blood, 

And that life-blood rich and red; 
By the case we've brought our masters, 

By the loads 'neath which we groan. 
My heart and my hand forever, 

For the working class — my own. 

By the day when the strife is over 

And the worker comes to his own; 
By the dawn of the glad to-morrow, 

When we reap where we have sown, 
When the last of the slaves shall he freemen 

And the last of the masters pass — 
My heart and my hand forever 

For my own — the working cla-s! 
— W. F. Williams, in "Tlie International" 
(South Africa). 



THE FUTURE OF ISLAM. 



Two spots, one at the eastern end of the 
Mediterranean, the other on the headwaters 
of the Persian gulf, have been from the lie 
ginning of time the keys of the near east. 
The history of that particular part of the 
earth's surface is the proof of this, and 
nation after nation understanding it, and 
desiring to lock the gates of the near east 
against their neighbors have struggled for 
these keys. The Romans understood it 
when they laid hands on the key in Con- 
stantinople, but the failure to obtain the 
other key in Mesopotamia was the cause 
of their eventual loss of their empire be- 
yond the Bosphorus. The early kalifs un- 
derstood it equally well, but, instead of 
uniting their forces, engaged in rivalry, 
so that eventually it was not to Bagdad 
or to Damascus that the triumph came, 
but to the Ottoman Turk instead. 

Constantinople where the east nominally 
joins the west. Mesopotamia where the 
near east is severed from the middle east, 
were two great strategical points on the 
great trade route along- which the wealth 
of India passed into Europe. It was lie- 
cause the Ottoman Turk had locked these 
doors that Columbus steered out into the 
Atlantic to find the new road to the east, 
and it is mainly because of this that Rus- 
sia has for so long so eagerly desired to 
hold the western key, since, with British 
sentinels at the Pillars of Hercules, and 
with British sentinels patrolling- the Xile, 
not even the possession of Constantinople 
would give her free access to the great 
oceans. It is, therefore, not curious that 
the German Weltpolitik should have 
grasped this fact, and that the German 
engineers should have laid the sleepers of 
the Bagdad railway along the road of the 
Roman and the Greek, the Arabian and 
the Turk. Nor is it curious that the 
Wilhelmstrasse should have realized the 
importance of Islam in the great political 
game it was intent on playing, and should 
have determined to make its influence felt 
in the city of the Kalif and the Sheik-ul- 
Islam. 

The eastern question, so far as it re- 
lates to the near east, is at once a religious 
and a commercial question, a question for 
the soldier and for the engineer. The 



kaliphate of Bagdad exists no more, and 
the kaliphate of Damascus has ceased to 
be, but to the Muhammadan world the 
Kalif of Constantinople stands as the em- 
bodiment of the civil and religious might 
of Islam, and. as such, enjoys an influence 
which would never have been, in other 
circumstances, enjoyed by one who was 
not a direct descendant of the Pn 
When, consequently, the Kalif threw in his 
lot with the Central Powers, in the pres- 
ent war, there were those who thought 
that the doom of the United Kingdom as 
the greatest Muhammadan power in the 
world was impending, and when the Kalif 
ordered the Green Flag to be hoisted, and 
the Sheik-ul-lslam proclaimed a holy war. 
many men in many countries wondered 
what would be the end. and trembled at 
the mere thought of a display of religious 
fanaticism which, no matter what the 
eventual end, might well, as it was in- 
tended to. have made many Armenias 
throughout the east. Men who remem- 
bered the parade ground at Meerut, the 
well at Lucknow, or the residency at Delhi 
were apprehensive of a repetition of scenes 
such as those which occurred in the days 
of the Mutiny, only on a scale which would 
have left the Mutiny a mere insignificant 
incident of religious fanaticism. 

What, then, were the forces which made 
the Green Flag flap futilely from its flag- 
staff, and which kept the green turbans 
from surging across the east? The one 
authority which could answer the ques- 
tion, the India Office, in London, has main- 
tained a silence grimmer even than that 
of the Admiralty, in Whitehall, which 
causes its submarines to go backwards and 
forwards across the Atlantic, and utters 
no word. Some day the whole romance 
will be known, some day the story of the 
advance against the rock of Aden will be 
told, some day the history of the negotia- 
tions with the Arab lords of the holy places 
will lie divulged, and some day the truth 
about the historic council in Kabul will be 
written. As it is the world knows more 
by far of the failure, somewhat sensational, 
and possibly more apparent than real, of 
the expedition to Bagdad, than of all the 
chain of events which froze the words of 
the Sheik-ul-lslam, almost on his lips. 
The day the Sheik-ul-lslam called Islam 
to unsheathe the sword at the bidding of 
the Kalif, both he and the Kalif discov- 
ered the strength of the J'.ritish raj in 
India, and also their own weakness as 
claimants to the mantle of the Prophet. 
Between black Islam and white Islam 
there had never been any particular unity. 
The shadow of the Damascus crime re- 
mains, and the Ottoman rather than the 
Arab has been dominant for centuries on 
the Ilosphorus. 

It was to this, probably, that the British 
agents largely trusted when they set to 
work to cause a breach in the ranks of 
"the faithful." in no less vital a spot than 
the holy places, Mecca and Medina. So 
successful were they that the local shereefs 
proclaimed their independence of the Kalif. 
and placed the shrines under the care of 
the Ilritish government. The Turks, pro- 
posing to attack Aden, found themselves 
with an enemy em their flank, on the coast 
of the Red Sea. as well as with the English 
battleships off the rock. So far from tak- 
ing Aden, they lost their own grip upon 
Arabia, without any chance of being able 



to re-establish it. Equally unsuccessful 

were they in their attempt to seduce the 
Amir of Afghanistan. A great council was 
held there in which the claim of the Kalif 
in Constantinople was supported by his 
agents. For the second time, however, in 
history an amir in Kabul stood by the 
British raj, and just as Dost Muhammad 
1 1 fused to launch the tribes through the 
Khyber in the crisis of the Mutiny, so 
Habibullah Khan refused to sacrifice the 
English alliance to the blandishments of 
Constantinople. Nominally no decision 
was taken, but the chiefs separated to do 
nothing, and nothing was done. In the 
same way whilst the British agents had 
been successfully pursuing their course in 
Arabia, the Turkish agents had been fail- 
ing signally in Hindustan. The great na- 
tive Muhammadan princes of India, so far 
from listening to them, placed themselves 
and their amies at the disposal of the 
CEOwn. It was unquestionably a tremen- 
dous test of their loyalty, for to them the 
Kalif on the Ilosphorus had always stood 
for the incarnation of the military power 
of Islam. When, however, their loyalty 
to the British raj came in question, there 
was no hesitation. Without exception they 
stood by the Viceroy as the Amir had 
stood by him. 

So the cry of the Sheif-ul-Islam smote 
on deaf ears. Neither in Arabia nor in 
Africa, neither in India nor in Afghanistan, 
was he able to rouse the expected blizzard 
of revolution. One petty mutiny of Sikh 
troops was all the trouble that came to 
England in the far east, but the Sikh is 
not a Muhammadan. As a result, if the 
Allies win, the fate of the Ottoman empire 
is sealed. < me gate of the east will see 
the Russian eagle hoisted over it, the other 
gate will pass under the dominion of the 
Union Jack. And so the condition of 
things which preceded the Turk will again 
be returned to, and the two gates will be 
in the hands of different powers. The 
Turk is. indeed, the only power that has 
ever held both gates, and the Turk was 
powerless to take advantage of his fortune. 



DO YOU KNOW THAT 



The Constitution of the United States 
doesn't mention health ? 



Procrastination in sanitary reform is the 
thief of health? 

A book on "Exercise and Health" may be 
had free for the asking - from the U. S. 
Public Health Service? 



Xot everybody can achieve greatness, but 
everybody can be clean? 

If you sow a hygienic habit you reap 
health — reap health and yon attain longevity? 



Railway cars would be sanitary if it 
weren't for the people in them ? 

America's typhoid fever bill is more than 
S 27l 1.000,000 a year? 

The fill 1 dinner pail is the enemy of tu- 
berculosis '1 



Good "union made" tobacco is in the 
market everywhere. It is your duty to refuse 
any other. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



COURAGE, PAIN AND DEATH. 



Power of will felt and manifested is said 
to be the joy of man. Such it is when 
it enables him to overcome fear, and dis- 
regard or be indifferent to posible pain or 
death. To be weak is to be miserable. 
Pains and fears of all sorts are intolerable 
when they make us conscious of weakness. 

Something of these thoughts is derived 
from the essay on "Courage, Pain and 
Dread of Death," written by Hartley Cole- 
ridge, an English essayist and poet of the 
last century: 

"The very follies and fripperies of man- 
kind bear witness to the existence of a 
nobler immaterial principle, still urging 
them to treat their bodies as their slaves, 
their property and not their very selves. 
For it is not to be forgotten that the 
vanity of persons, the pride of fashion, 
the desire of admiration, the dread of 
singularity, or whatever else may have 
prompted these practices, however repre- 
hensible in its excess, is still an intellectual, 
not a sensual principle. The Hindu who 
reclines upon a couch of spikes; the nun 
who wears sackcloth, or she who gives 
. her tawny skin to be needled and flowered 
as if it were an insensible garment ; each 
and all display a spirit that is stronger 
than sense, a power that laughs at pain, 
a soul that tyrannizes over the flesh, as if 
it were something alien and of another 
nature. Xor do I doubt that man — aye, 
and soft, trembling woman also — may exult 
in agony and rejoice with the joy of vic- 
tory upon the rack. 

"The power of supporting pain and defy- 
ing death is no proof of righteousness; nor 
is its exercise sure evidence of a good 
cause or even of sincerity in error. It is a 
gift, not a grace — a natural gift, a faculty, 
innate, and only wanting in a few con- 
stitutionally defective, or unnerved by 
sloth and luxury. The love of life and ease 
is indeed strong in every breast, and will 
ever prevail where not duly counterbal- 
anced. Wise and thoughtful men often 
seem to overvalue their life and limbs, be- 
cause they will not risk them for trivial 
gains. ( )thers, endowed with fine faculties, 
but lacking the principle that should direct 
their use, turn cowards, sensualists, from 
a pride of superior sense. They are wise 
enough to despise the ordinary prizes of 
human ambition, but they have not the 
light which points to an incorruptible 
crown. Thus from mere contempt of oth- 
ers they degrade themselves. Their ques- 
tion is still, What is there worth fighting 
for? Their shrewd wits tell them, nothing 
on earth ; but they are lamentably blind 
to the great ends for which the ability to 
dare and suffer were bestowed. 

"Death can never be indifferent till man 
is assured, which none ever was yet, that 
with his breath his being passes into noth- 
ing. Whether his hopes and fears steer 
by the chart and compass of a formal 
creed, or drift along the shoreless sea of 
faithless conjecture, a possible eternity of 
bliss or bale can never be indifferent. 
The idea of extinction is not terrible, sim- 
ply because man cannot form such an idea 
at all. Let him try as long as he will — 
let him negative every conceived and con- 
ceivable form of future existence — he is as 
far as ever from having exhausted the in- 
finitude of possibility. Imagination will 



continually produce the line of conscious- 
ness through limitless darkness. Many are 
the devices of fancy to relieve the soul 
from the dead weight of unideal nothing. 
Some crave a senseless duration in dry- 
bones or sepulchral ashes or ghastly mum- 
mies; or, rather than not to be, would 
dwell in the cold obstruction of the grave 
or the damp, hollow seclusion of the 
charnel-house. Some choose a life in 
others' breath, an everlasting fame, and 
listen delighted to the imaginary voice of 
unborn ages. Some secure a permanence 
in their works, their country, their pos- 
terity ; and yet neither the protracted dis- 
solution of the carcass nor the ceaseless 
tradition of remorse, nor a line of progeny 
stretched out to the crack of doom can 
add an instant to the brief existence of the 
conscious being." 

In other words, the power of will makes 
the normal man insensible to that con- 
sciousness which brings into prominence 
the attributes of weakness. One then must 
cultivate a calm poise and the endurance 
of those things which must be faced in 
life. 



THE REAL "SHIRKERS." 



Whether "Patriotism" has or has not 
succeeded in dodging income tax in Great 
Britain, it has certainly done so in Labor- 
ruled Australia. We read that banks, life 
assurance societies, and other big financial 
institutions have subscribed millions or 
thousands of sterling capital to the war 
loan "in order to show their patriotism." 
Presumably our domestic pirates, the ship- 
ping companies, were similarly animated, 
for they have piloted their rich thievery of 
high freights into the same secure haven 
of refuge. Refuge from what? From in- 
come tax and war profit tax, of course. 
Let all and sundry exploiters feed fat on 
the body social, and they shall escape scot- 
free. Rut someone pays the interest. That 
someone is the mass of the people, humbler 
but honest folk, and their burden in that 
respect is made all the heavier by a section 
of the community having been allowed to 
shirk their duty to the State and their 
obligations to their fellowmen. They don't 
believe in principle, but they do believe in 
interest. This is the "pious editor's creed"; 
this is the commercial psalter; this is the 
only commandment: Do others. Oh, Pa- 
triotism, what frauds are perpetrated in thy 
name ! — The Queensland Worker. 



Law never made a man a whit more 
just; and by means of their respect for it, 
even the well-disposed are daily made the 
agents of injustice. A common and natural 
result of an undue respect for law is that 
you may see a file of soldiers, colonel, 
captain, corporal, privates, powder-mon- 
keys, and all, marching in admirable order 
over hill and dale to the wars, against 
their wills, aye, against their common 
sense and conscience, which makes it very 
Steep marching indeed, and produces a 
palpitation of the heart. They have no 
doubt that it is a damnable business in 
which they are concerned ; they arc all 
peaceably inclined. Now, what are they? 
Men at all, or small movable forts and 
magazines, at the service of some un- 
scrupulous man in power?— Henry David 
Thoreau. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. T 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 406 N. Clark Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 365. 

BRANCHES: 
Euffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

A sli tabula, O. Erie, Pa. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELEF STATIONS: 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg. N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Midi. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Wis. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

I.udington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie. Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Ejsto, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



guards, the right to free speech, free as- 
sembly, have been arbitrarily denied them, 
and the decision of the board held as a 
judgment in law, and eventually forced 
upon the workers. 

"Above all, we hold that compulsory 
arbitration includes involuntary servitude, 
and any effort on the part of State or 
nation to enact a law which in effect would 
deny us our right to withhold our labor 
power, as individuals or collectively, must 
be regarded as a reversion to the time 
when a workingman was considered as the 
property of the owners of the land and of 
the industries, and must be resisted by 
the workers to the last ditch. 

"A law that might specify only those 
who are engaged in interstate transporta- 
tion could easily be amended to include 
those engaged in other industries, once the 
principle was established. To safeguard 
the liberties we have won through centuries 
of unceasing struggle, it behooves us to 
jealously guard against any attempt to enact 
a law for compulsory arbitration, for in the 
end. such law would include involuntary 
servitude." 



Cats Making Laws for Mice. 

When the land question was under con- 
sideration in the British Parliament, which 
consisted wholly of land owners, John 
Bright thus characterized the situation : 
"We are now in the parliament of the cats 
making laws for the mice." The same 
characterization applies exactly to the so- 
lution which Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., 
has worked out for the labor problem. The 
industrial war which existed for months in 
the mines of the Colorado Fuel and Iron 
Company stirred the conscience of John D. 
Rockefeller. Jr., who felt compelled to do 
something "to better the situation in Colo- 
rado." He had publicly announced that he 
preferred to lose every cent he had invested 
in Colorado rather than recognize the union 
and permit the miners to establish better 
conditions in accord with their own ideals. 

As Mr. Rockefeller would not recant he 
was compelled to devise a new system. 
He secured the advice of professional hu- 
manitarians and then advertised that he 
had "solved" the labor problem and would 
establish industrial democracy. His plan 
provides for a maze of committees, each of 
which is assigned to deal with some mat- 
ter that affects conditions of work. The 
miners are to "elect" representatives to 
serve on these committees. The commit- 
tees meet with the representatives of the 
company and consider all "grievances" that 
shall be referred to them. An appeal may 
be taken from the decision of the commit- 
tee and may be carried through a succes- 
sion of committees. An "adjustment" may 
come after many committees and many 
months. Superficially the plan provides for 
the adjustment of any complaint or mis- 
understanding that may arise. It provides 
everything for the workers except that 
which is essential for influence in indus- 
trial affairs — power. 

Like the parliament of cats making laws 
for the mice. Mr. John D. Rockefeller 
and his advisers have formulated a solu- 
tion that protects employers. He presumes 
to say that the miners can secure justice 
and solve their problems without the 
power, and he pretends they can do this 



in dealing with the company; that is, 
backed by all of the power of 26 Broad- 
way. But the elaborate machinery of the 
Rockefeller labor solution (the cats) can 
not any longer deceive the mice. Already 
the report comes that the miners of Colo- 
rado want real unions — organizations affili- 
ated to the United Mine Workers of 
America. A trade union, like any other 
organic institution, must be the result of 
natural growth. An artificial substitute, 
even though labeled "just as good" by the 
Rockefeller Publicity Department, will not 
replace the trade union organization that 
is the outgrowth of years of experience and 
a response to human needs. — President 
Gompers, in American Federationist. 



Employers Promote Thrift. 

There is an effort going on among em- 
ployers in Chicago to encourage thrift 
among their employes — to get them to save 
some of their money for future investment 
and rainy days. One way pursued to en- 
courage thrift is to take an employe's bank- 
book on pay day and return it with such 
part of his pay as he desires credited in it. 
This makes a sure thing of his saving. 
and relieves him of all trouble. It begets 
and confirms the habit of economy, and be- 
fore the employe knows it he has a com- 
fortable sum in the bank. 

Another way is for the company to use 
the employe's savings, through a definite 
agreement, and pay him 5 or 6 per cent, 
and thus use his savings in the conduct of 
its business. Still another way is for the 
company to add 1 or 2 per cent, to the 
3 per cent, allowed at the bank. This is an 
expense, of course, upon the business, but 
it has been found to pay. Other methods 
are adopted, and they all benefit both em- 
ployer and employe. 

Most workers prefer to handle their own 
savings. 



Decorate A. F. of L. Home. 

C. W. Bowerman, secretary parliamen- 
tary committee British Trades Union Con- 
gress, has forwarded President Gompers a 
photograph of the piece of marble sculp- 
ture, entitled "The Triumph of Labor," 
which will be installed in the new Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor building as a 
fraternal expression by English trade 
unionists. The work will be enclosed in a 
frame of English oak, with a gilt bronze 
band of laurel surrounding. The size of 
the marble will be 6x3 feet. 

Secretary Bowerman writer : 

"The central figure is symbolic of the 
triumph and is standing upon an octopus 
with tentacles lopped and dying, slain by 
the noble aims and objects achieved by 
labor. Behind this figure is a great pro- 
cession without beginning or end. On one 
side are the earliest types of workers — 
husbandmen and tillers of the earth — and 
on the other the modern workers. Labor- 
ers, agriculture, miners and various other 
trades are represented. In the background, 
ships, cranes, etc." 



Free Land in United States. 
Secretary of the Interior Lane announces 
that there are 250,000,000 acres of public 
land in the United States to be taken over 
by homesteaders. In twenty-five States, 
from California to Michigan and Florida to 
Washington, public domains are scattered 
and ready to be opened. All but 2.200.000 



acres lie in the far West. Nevada, with 
55,375,077 acres, contains the largest area. 
Unsurveyed land totals 92,000,000 acres. 
Of the twenty-five States containing public 
lands, Missouri has the least, 952 acres, in 
sixteen counties. A summary of the land: 
Alabama, 42.680; Arizona, 23,597,219; 
Arkansas. 402,219; California. 20.025,999 \ 
Colorado, 14,908,127; Florida, 135,387; 
Idaho, 15,501,561; Kansas, 56,018; Louisi- 
ana, 44,804; Michigan, 90,540; Minnesota,' 
798,804; Mississippi, 30.374; Missouri, 952; 
Montana, 16,649,725; Nebraska, 146,256; 
Nevada. 55,375,077; New Mexico, 26,338,- 
379; North Dakota, 381,199; Oklahoma, 
55.250; Oregon, 15.337.809; South Dakota, 
2,382,588 ; Utah. 32,968,837 ; Washing! i m . 
1,132,571; Wisconsin. 5,872: Wvoming, 
25.528.492. Total. 254,945,589. 



SILENT IN ANY LANGUAGE. 



It was said of the first Gen. von Moltke 
that he knew how to keep silent in seven 
languages. Hughes has the great strate- 
gist beaten by as many more languages as 
there are. 

Just now it is the ghost of the Danbury 
Hatters' decision that is rising to plague 
the "100 per cent, candidate." In one of 
his Ohio meetings he was met with cries 
of "How about the Danbury Hatters' case?" 
These cries followed him along the street 
and were repeated continuously during his 
meeting. 

At its close, and after he had left the 
platform, Hughes is said to have inquired 
what the people were asking. It would ap- 
pear that he is also deaf in several lan- 
guages. 

This heckling is disturbing the Hughes 
supporters and is not pleasing to some of 
the Wilson organs. The general com- 
plaint is that it shows a "disrespect for the 
Supreme Court" to question a previous 
member of that body, even though he is 
now a candidate, concerning his action on 
the bench. 

If there is one institution in the world 
that needs disrespect and contempt it is 
the Supreme Court of the United States. 
If there is one decision of that court that 
outranks the Dred Scott decision in its 
rottenness, it is the decision that robbed 
the Danbury hatters of their homes and 
lifetime savings. 

While wearing the cap and gown of a 
justice it was possible to masquerade be- 
hind the dignity that protects the insolence 
of judicial arrogance and refuse to explain 
any acts. But this uniform has been laid 
aside for the cap and bells of the political 
entertainer who will conclude his perform- 
ance by passing the ballot box for votes. 
There is, therefore, no reason why the 
public should not insist upon obtaining the 
reasons that led to judicial assaults upon 
human liberties. — Milwaukee Leader. 



The men who set America free will be 
greater than the men who put her in 
swaddling clothes. — Woodrow Wilson. 



"REAL PREPAREDNESS." 
(Continued from page 7.) 



without due process of law. If this decision 
stands a national dcht of around ten billion dol- 
lars, with an annual interest charge of five hun- 
dred million dollars, or about twenty-live dollars 
per family of our present population, will be fas- 
tened upon the country forever." 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



TRIESTE. 



Trieste, the principal seaport of Austria, 
which figures so prominently in the news 
of the day, goes back for the beginnings 
of its history into ancient days. It is first 
mentioned about 100 B. C. as a village, a 
place of no importance, situated some 
twenty-six miles by road east-southeast 
of Aquileia. Some fifty years later, it is 
recorded that the place was attacked by 
barbarian tribes from the interior, and 
about twenty years later still, Trieste 
makes its definite emergence into history 
during the Dalmatian wars waged by 
Augustus. 

The Romans, with that sure judgment 
which characterized their empire building, 
recognized the importance of the site upon 
which Trieste now stands. Augustus con- 
sequently decided to found a Roman col- 
ony there. The little village quickly be- 
came a town, and, as a defense against the 
wild Celtic and Ulyrian tribes of the sur- 
lounding country, who always gave the 
Romans so much trouble, the new city 
was surrounded by a wall and fortified 
with towers. It was given the name of 
Tergeste, quickly became a flourishing Ro- 
man colony and had a large territory at- 
tached to it. In those days, just as to- 
day, the importance of Trieste lay mainly 
in its commerce, as the natural outlet for 
Pannonia and Dalmatia, and in those days, 
just as to-day, it was a beautiful city. 
The loftily situated cathedral of San 
Giusto, which dominates the town, is built 
on the site of the old Roman temple, and 
anyone who will examine the tower will 
find how some of the old Roman walls 
and columns have been built into it. 
Then, in the museum may be found in- 
scriptions and mosaic pavements telling 
here of Roman occupation, as they do 
from Hexam to Hippo, and from Gib- 
raltar to Jerusalem. 

On the fall of the empire in the west, 
the history of Trieste merges into the his- 
tory of Istria. It passed through trou- 
blous times. It was pillaged by the Longo- 
bardi and the Goths; was annexed to the 
Frankish kingdom by Pepin in 789 ; fell 
into the hands of the dukes of Carinthia 
about the middle of the tenth century, and 
from thence it passed successively through 
the hands of the dukes of Meran, the 
dukes of Bavaria into the possession of the 
republic of Venice. For the next 180 
years, the history of Trieste is chiefly 
a record of conflicts with the great city to 
the south, and in the end Trieste placed 
herself under the protection of Leopold III 
of Austria. Leopold was only too willing 
to undertake the trust, and so from pro- 
tection, Austria advanced to overlordship 
and from overlordship to actual possession. 
Twice during the Napoleonic period, name- 
ly, from 1797 to 1805, and from 1809 to 
1813, Trieste was in the possession of 
France. In this latter year, however, 
Austria seized the city and the surround- 
ing district of Istria, and it has remained 
an Austrian possession ever since. 

Situated at the northeast angle of the 
Adriatic sea, at the end of a deeply in- 
dented gulf, Trieste, in normal times, prac- 
tically monopolizes the trade of the Ad- 
riatic. It has long since outstripped its 
old rival, Venice, and, during the last 
decade especially, has grown rapidly in 
importance and in wealth. It is pictur- 



esquely built in terraces at the foot of the 
Karst hills, and the aspect of the town is 
Italian rather than German, as indeed are 
most of the towns along this part of the 
Adriatic seaboard. There are two towns, 
of course, the old and the new, and the 
highway between them, the Via del Corso, 
so well known to the traveler, is a place 
filled with much business and affairs. The 
old town is one of narrow streets, steep 
and irregular, all winding up to or round 
the Schlossberg, the hill on which stands 
the castle. The new town spreads itself 
abroad after the fashion of so many new 
towns. It covers the flat expanse sur- 
rounding the crescent-shaped bay, and it 
is a place of broad streets and large squares 
and artistic monuments. 



KOSTER STILL EXPLAINING. 



Mr. Frederick J. Koster of the Chamber 
of Commerce of San Francisco is using a 
lot of his valuable time in explaining that 
the C. of C. is not opposing unions in their 
"rightful and lawful" sphere, and that the 
only opposition directed at the labor organ- 
izations is prompted by the "unrighteous 
and lawless" actions of the unions. 

That sounds both fair and fine, and it 
would seem that the C. of C. might per- 
form a distinct service to the people of that 
city by working along lines about as fol- 
lows : 

The laws of this State make quite clear 
what is lawful and what is unlawful. Now, 
when the C. of C. finds the unions doing 
that which is unlawful the C. of C. should 
forthwith report such unlawful act to the 
Grand Jury or to the District Attorney and 
lend all possible aid in prosecuting the 
offenders. That is the ordinary course of 
procedure in abating lawlessness, and it has 
been found quite efficient through practise 
extending over a long period of years in 
the American States. 

Koster and his crowd are bent upon an 
entirely different line of work. In the first 
place, Koster, Lynch et al. have some 
money coming for their work as managers 
of a certain line of agitation. They are 
going to keep that money coming by doing 
what they are paid to do. The ultimate 
intention of the work is to destroy effi- 
ciency of the unions in their "righteous and 
lawful" activities. They will fail. 

It is the business of the unions to see 
that they fail. — Bakersfield Union Labor 
Journal. 



COMPELLING LOGIC. 



Recruiting Officer to Passing Workman : 
Now, sir, what do you say to fighting for 
your country? 

P. W. : Nay, lad, I don't want to fight. 

R. O. : Don't want to fight? Where 
would the war be if every one spoke like 
you? 

P. W. : I suppose there'd be no fight. — 
"Labor Leader." 



Must the citizen even for a moment, or 
in the least degree, resign his conscience 
to the legislator? I think we should be 
men first and subjects afterwards. It is 
not so desirable to cultivate a respect for 
the law as for the right. — Thorcau. 



Liberty and monopoly can not live to- 
gether. — Henry D. Lloyd. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where thy have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA. B. C, 1424 Government St. 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 213 Hastings St., E. corner of 
Hastings and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2216 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 



875. 



PORTLAND, Ore., 242 Flanders St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Room No. 203, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 214. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 98 Second St. N. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Aciencles • 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42- 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 
PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada, 437 Gore Ave. 
PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada, P. O. Box 968. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



PAY" AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 10 East St. 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



Reports to the annua' convention 
of International Spinners' Union 
which was held in Boston, Mass., 
showed that during the past year 
conditions had greatly improved and 
that wage advances had been secured 
amounting to 15 and 20 per cent. 
Forty delegates, representing twenty 
districts, attended. Resolutions urging 
a general eight-hour workday for 
women and children and favoring 
health insurance were adopted. 

The new compensation law re- 
cently put in force in Kentucky as 
the result of the continued agit 
of the trade unions i- producing 
i results. Out of 1656 indus- 
trial injuries reported t' 1 the Work- 
men's Compensation Board only one 
claim for adjudication has been sub- 
mitted. All the others have been 
or are being settled "out of curt." 
which means that cither the employ- 
ers and employes arc agreeing upon 
ttlement or are submitting the 
state of facts to the board or one 
df the members ami adopting with- 
out contest the compensation recom- 
mended. 

The Erie Brakeshoe Company, war 

munitions manufacturers, has a strike 
on its hands now of its unorganized 
employes becau.se of an attempt to 
reduce wages on its accumulated 
rush work. The meffl were being 
paid fairly good wages and were 
rendering lj'hkI service. The com 
pany believed they would not resent 
a cut in wages and gave notice to 
that effect and the strike followed. 
Similar action by other companies 
manufacturing war munitions is ex- 
pei ted to t"< dli '\\ in the next few 
weeks, owing to the fact that the 
number of unemployed men will 
increase as soon :is the weather cur- 
tails the amount <>i outdoor work. 

One of the big influences at the 
next Oregon legislature will be the 
joint legislative committee of the 
Grange, the Farmers' Union and the 
Central Labor Council. Public cele- 
bration of this alliance was the main 
feature of the Labor Day exercises. 
Addresses delivered by State Mastet 
C. E. Spence, of the Grange; Presi- 
dent (.'. 1). Brown, of the Farmers' 
Union, and President Eugene E. 
Smith, of the Central Labor Council, 
were characterized by earnest 
and determination. The three \ 
the conviction of their followers that 
the producing classes are victimized 
by the commercial and wealthy 
ses. By their allied power they 
hope to be a determining factor in 
much legislation in which they are 
interi 

The "Survey" writes: ''The strike- 
breakers of 1907 have become the 
strikers of 1916 in the iron mines of 
Minnesota. Coming over in boat- 
loads from southeastern Europe nine 
years ago, and hired by tin- United 
States Steel Corporation to break 
the iron strike called at that time by 
the Western Federation of Miners, 
these polyglot nationalities, speaking 
thirty-six different tongues, have be- 
come solidified insofar a6 that is 
ible, under the I. \V. \\ ., in the 
melting-pot of the Mesaba mines. 
day linns, Slavs, Croats, Bulgars, 
Italians and Rumanians have laid 
down picks and shovels and are de- 
manding an eight-hour day. a mini- 
mum wage of $3 for dry work and 
$3.50 for wet work in underground 
mines and $2.75 in open pits, aboli- 
tion of the contract labor system and 
pay day twice a month." 



Office Phone 
Elliott 1196 



MARSHALL'S 



Residence 
North 3445 



NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

Compasses Adjusted 

301-2 P. I. BUILDING, Next to Post Office 

Established 1890 SEATTLE, WASH. 



Eureka, Cal. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 
1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St 
Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wath., Letter Litt. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 

. J. 
Andersen, A. -tx.'l 
!i, ( is. ar 
on, G. (Cas- 
sie) 
Anderson, Frank 

E. -1323 
Anderson, Anker A 
Andersen, a. P, 
Andersen, Hjalmar 
Anderson, G. -1831 
Albregtsen, Gal. 

As-tail. < >i 

Augustln, II. 

I, F. 
Benson, D. 

A. 
hi.!. Ivar 
Berknes, Ole 
Bramlej . i ■:. 
Brodle, J. 
Brennan, P. 
Bye, Elnar 
Carlson, Gust 

Carlson, Harry 

on, Krik 
(*liiist.ns.n, -1366 

Cottlngbam, F. 
Davldsen, John 
Duncan, Geo. 

.1 ii. \V. 

Emkow, Otto 
Eriksen, Otto 
Erlckson, Lars 
Eriksen, Kristoffer 
Erdman, Paul 
Erbe, L. J. 

i O. 
Paster, A. 
Fernquist, C. W. 
Pord, L. 

Predericksen, B. J 
Predrlksen, I. H. G 

r, Fritz 
GUlet, II. 
Goodman, W. 
Grant, I 

i. Tlios. 
Haavold, l' 

rud, n. ii. 
llalin. J. 

Hotten, C. 
Hoist, Herman 
Jalmke, otto 
Jensen, Hans 
Jenkins. Fred 
Johansen, 

Jonsson, Karl 
Johnson, Karl 
Jorgensen, Fred 
Junge, II. 

Ki.lli. <:. 
Koch, W. 

K\ lander. II. 

Kalberg, Arvid 

J. 
Larsen, N 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larkin, Thos. 
., C. H. 
Magnusen, Lars 
Mil ads, H' in y 
Mcintosh, James 
McManus, P. 



Martlnsen, Aim. 

• •n. John 
Morrisay, .i 
Mynkmeyer, H. 
Monroe, A. J. G. 
M. 

H. 
Mikkelsen, W. 
Moore, Albert 
X.ss, T. 
Nelson, Werner 
Nelson, Charley 
.\. is. ii. Adolf 
Nero, Jerome 
Nilsen, Feder 
Nielson, Alfone 
Niwerth, a. 
Nordstrom, B, 
Nygard, Oluf 

i lis, ii. .lames 
I llsen, 1 laralil 

Ole -r.4 2 
Olsson, i. ii. 
Olsen, i 'in M. 
Olsen, Oswald 

i lis. n. I'ar! 

x. i: 

Ols. II. .1. 

i ilsen, Prank 

i ista.l. B. 

rlund, W. 
( izerhowski, 
Pattrson, P. 

en, Mini iniii 
Petterson, B. S. 
I 'eters. 

S. 

i -nil 

Pleklstrom, J. 

Pergler, C. 

Plnger, B. T. 
.Pollack, T. 
. Pictzman, I.. D. 

Publicates, Aug. 

Peterson, W. 

Powers, .lames A. 

l '.i rsen, I * n i 

Rasmussen, John 
musen, Arthur 

Rajala, V. 

Reinlnk, H. 

Robberstad, 

Etodstal, Anton 

Ruff. All. 

Rundstrom, A. 

Salisbury, T. 

Sarin. C. 

Sanseter, F. 
Stammerjoban, C, 

i: C 
Schultz, W. 
n. .1. 
Selbert, <;. 

T. 
Smith, T. 
St. Clair. C. 
Sorensen, M. 
Sorensen, Geo. 
Tin. rsen. Carl 

. i], 
Wlklng, Aim. 
Wicksten, A. 
Williams. T, C. 
Voung, A. 
Zekow. 1 1 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER. FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 

Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Adolfsson. Gottfrid 
Rratt. F. H. 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Hodson, H. I. 
Jacobson. Gustaf 
Jensen, Hans -1555 
Fundgren, Carl 
Magnusson, Ernest 

W. 
Marks, Thorwald 
Martinsson, E. 



Melngail, M. 
Nielsen. Niels -751 
Olsson, Per 
Peel, Peter 
Simonson. Sigvard 
Soter. Erik 
Suominen, Oskar 
Svensen, John 
Fllman. Emil 
VIgen, Elias 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

Union Made Goods, Hats. Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 8393 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Alfred Pettersen Hilland, a native 
of Bergen, Norway, age 44, is in- 
quired for by his brother, Randolph 
Pettersen. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, 100 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 7-26-16 

Gumersindo Fernandez, formerly 
messboy on steamer "Watson," 
should call at the offices of Nathan 
H. Frank, 1215 Merchants Exchange 
Bklg., San Francisco, and receive 
salvage money due him from S. S. 
"Camino." 8-30-16 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy $ Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP'OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 
Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cat. 

ED. SWANSON. Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter Litt 

Contreras. Julio Kustel. Victor J. 

Kyrkslatt, Lars Klnowsky, A. 

Lawrence. Harry Ingebrethsen, Alf. 
Melander, G. L. 



Alaska Fishermen 



Arentse. John 
Ast, P. 

Brormare, Adolf 
Carey, Arthur L. 
Frost, H. C. 
Hakanson, John 
Janscn. Jacob 
Jansson, Axel. J. 
.lohnsen, Harry 
Johnsen, August 



Koester, Ernst 
Kester, Erich 
Knudsen, O. 
Larsen, Martin 
Nelson. Chas. R. 
Noland. Edvard 
Odland, Sven 
Petersen, Andrew 
Werner, Chas. J. 
Wilhelmson, Seth 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Hans Nilson, a native of Tons- 
berg, Norway, was last heard from 
;it Mobile, Ala., is inquired for by 
his mother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts kindly notify Louis 
Donald, Norwegian Vice Consul, 77 
St. Francis St., Mobile, Ala. 12-22-15 

Hugo Carlson Ljung, age 29, a 
native of Gothenborg, Sweden, was 
last heard from in a Cable Boat on 
the Atlantic Coast, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify John Carl- 
son Ljung, Jungmansgatan 5, Goth- 
enborg, Sweden. 1-12-16 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Thomas Rowe (now aged about 
74), who was at one time a seaman 
and longshoreman on the Pacific 
Coast and also served in the Pacific 
Coast Navy Yards, will greatly oblige 
inquiring relatives by supplying such 
information. Address, Editor, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 1-5-6 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET AT THIRD AND KEARNY 



FALL STYLES NOW READY 
FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

Prices $30 to $50 

Unl0n Own d Shop ° Ur OPEN SATURDAY EVENINGS UNTIL 10 O'CLOCK 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 



Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



P. ROSBNSTBIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots. Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, Nils Johansson, Chas. 
Anderson, Rasmus -2407 

Benson, S. Jensen, Henry -2176 

Bernhardsen, Chas. Kjer, Magnus 

Bernadt, H. W. Kristensen, Wm. 

Bosse, Geo. Kroon, Al. 

Brandt, Rrvid Kaskinan, Albert 

Bleile, E. Lindberg, A. C. 

Dybdal, Olaf Dange, Peter n. 

Dahl, Ludwig Larsson, Ragnar 

Drosbeck, Carl Lalan, Joe. 

Edstrom, John Moberg, K. G. C. 

Elers, H. Nygren, Gust 

Engstrom, Erick Nilsen, Emil 

Ericksen, H. C. Ohlsson, J. W. 

Fisher, Fritz Oglive, Wm. A. 

Guthre, Raymond Olson, David 

Guildersen, E. Paulson, Herman 

Gregory, W. Palm, P. A. 

Geiger, Joe. Rensmand, Robert 

Hoten, J. Rosenberg, Adolf 

Henriks, Waldemar Swanson, John L. V. 
Hendricksen, GeorgeSorensen, Jorgen 

Hoppenbrower, P. Shallies, Gust. 

Herman, D. Thorcn, Paul 

Jespersen, Martin Westengren, C. W. 

Jonsson, Karl Zaukert, Carl 
Jarwinen, John 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Patrick McFee, who was cook on 
board the schooner "Robert Henry" 
on a voyage to Mexico last year, is 
inquired for by the U. S. Shipping 
Commissioner, at San Francisco, Cal. 

9-15-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



In' 



Union 

MADE 

Beer 




AND 

Porter 



^SDo Of America rG&r 

COPYRIGHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 
THIS IS OUR LABEL 



DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



Home News. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 

Albers, George Krause, Otto 
Anderson, William Kuldsen, John 
Anderson, John Koster, Walter 
Anderson, Chris. Kottler, William 
Anderson, A. P. Kard, Hjalmar 
Andersen, Andrew Lindholm, John 
Andersen, Olaf -1118Lindgren, Ernst 
Bjerk, Gustav Lindroos, A. W. 
Bjerk, Geo. Lundkvist, Alarick 
Burmeister, T. Ludvigsen, Arne 
Bjorklund, G. Leedham, Max 
Benson, W. J. Lucey, James 
Bowman, C. McLeave, John 
Brogard, N. Munsen, Fred 
Bohn, Gus Nilsen, Harry- 
Carlson, Adolf M. Nielsen, C. 
Carlson, Gustaf Nordman, Karl 
Carlson, Walter Olsen, W. 
Christiansen, Paaso, Andrew 

Dedrlck Pettersen, Karl 

Crentz, F. Peterson, Nels 

Davis, Frank A. Peters, Walter 

Deam, James Peltsan, Jacob 

Donalson, Harry Pedersen, Alf 

Eriksen, Ole Risenius, Sven 

Grau, Aksil -1116 Rudt, Walter 

Gronros, Oswald Robertson, A. 

Gronlund, Oskar Scheftner, Bernhard 

-414 Sandgvist, Junnar 

Gueno, Pierre Stemvall, Sigurd 

Harley, Alex Sward, Arnold 

Holmroos, W. Scarabosio, M. 

High, Edward Skotel, A. 

Hansen, Ove Max Toves, H. C. 

Hansen, Jack Torin, Gustaf A. 

Hansen, Thorleif Windt, Walter 

Hvlander, Gustaf Williams, T. C. 

Jensen, L. Waaler, Edgar 

Jensen, L. M. P. Wehrman, John 

John, F. Johanson Wagner. Ed. 

Johnsen, Walter Wedequist, Axel 
Johansen, A. Harry Packages. 

Johnson, Fred -1723 Benson, Charles 

Johansson, Arvo Houstor, Harry 
Johnson, Alexander 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Eugene Martin, age 25, 6 feet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired for by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin, 4231 15 N. E., Seattle, 
Wash. 1-27-15 



A Useless Visitor. — "Say, young 
feller." said Broncho Bob, "have you 
got a gun on you?" 

"No, sir," replied the man with 
the brand-new cowboy uniform. "I 
was told that it was better to he 
unarmed, so as to avoid any im- 
pression that I was seeking a quar- 
rel." 

"Well, that's a big disappointment. 
T needed a brand-new pun an' 
thought you'd be liringin' along at 
least a pair of 'cm. Don't you let 
anything like this occur again." — 
\\ ashington Star. 



The Answer. — "Whal is your posi- 
tion on these public questions?" 

"My position," replied the confident 
candidate, "is very simple. I am 
personally the answer to all of 
them." — Washington Star. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Paul Laux, American, age 23, 6 
feet tall, who was last heard from 
about 4 years ago at San Jose, Cal., 
supposed to be a sailor, is inquired 
for. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify his father, Carl 
Laux, 112 E. 28th St., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 6-21-16 

Adolph Krakan, last heard of at 
Port Pirie, January, 1912, and again 
in March, 1913, from Warumbo, 118 
miles from Adelaide, South Australia, 
is inquired for by his mother at 
Hamburg, Germany. 8-25-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and 
blue eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Any information regarding Wilhelm 
Kuhme, age 27, a native of Germany, 
who was supposed to have been 
drowned in the wreck of the steam 
schooner "Francis H. Leggett," Sep- 
tember 18, 1914, will be thankfully re- 
ceived by the German Consul, San 
Francisco, Cal. 1-19-16 

Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from 
since 1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother, J. Marjama, 51 
South St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 

Bernard Baasen, a native of She- 
boygan, Wis., a former member of 
the L. S. U., who was last heard 
from at Milwaukee, Wis., April 29, is 
inquired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts pl^nse no- 
tify Mrs. Sophie Baarsen, 561 Clinton 
street, Milwaukee, Wis. 7-5-16 



In New York City the Mothers' 
Pension Department established by 
law — witli funds collected by taxation 
— reports that it cost 5 per cent, for 
administration of Pensions to Moth- 
ers. 

The Montgomery, Alabama, Board 
of Education recently announced that 
a tuition fee will hereafter be 
charged all pupils entering the public 
schools. The action is caused by 
deficiency in income. 

The estate of James J. Hill, the 
railroad financier, according to a 
preliminary inventory by the Probate 
Court in St. Paul, Minn., approxi- 
mates $40,000,000, upon which the 
State will receive $1,250,000 as in- 
heritance tax. 

The Spanish Line steamship "An- 
tonio Lopez," which arrived at New 
York recently from Barcelona and 
Cadiz, had on board two German 
stowaways, former sailors of the 
German steamship "Belgrano," laid 
up at Coruna. 

Henry Ford has brought suit 
against the Chicago Tribune for 
$1,000,000 damages. The suit is based 
on an editorial in the issue of June 
23 headed "Ford Is an Anarchist," 
and alleging that Ford would dis- 
charge employes who joined the 
militia. 

A protest against the presence of 
four Xegro officers as members of 
a court martial composed of twelve 
officers trying white soldiers at San 
Antonio has been filed at Washing- 
ton. The protest alleges that this is 
the first time that enlisted white 
men were compelled to stand trial 
before Xegroes. 

The Atchison, Topeka and Santa 
Fc Railway Company, for the year 
ending June 30 last, reports operating 
revenues or gross earnings of $133,- 
762,392, an increase of slightly more 
than $16,000,000 over the preceding 
year; operating expenses of $83,730,- 
960, an increase of about $7,600,0(11', 
and net operating revenues of $50,- 
031,432, an increase of $8,457,398. 

On the charge of having stated at 
a public meeting that all women who 
read the work of Karl Marx are 
free lovers, Russel G. Dunn of the 
Anti-Socialist League was placed un- 
der $100 bond for six months at the 
Fighth Avenue court in Brooklyn. 
lie was asked in court to point out 
the passage in Marx's work advocat- 
ing free love, but was unable to 
do so. 

The supcrdreadnaught "Arizona" 
has just been completed at the New 
York Navy Yard. Navy Department 
officials arc elated over the success 
which has marked the Arizona's con- 
struction by Government workmen. 
Acting Secretary Roosevelt said the 
ship was not only finished on sched 
ulc time, but would save the Gov- 
ernment about $1,000,000, as com- 
pared with lowest estimates of pri- 
vate concerns. The navy yard em- 
ployes work eight hours and are paid 
the prevailing union rate. 

A formal announcement \\:is made 
to the effect that President Wilson 
lias selected Major-General Goethals, 
Commissioner Clarke of the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission and 
George Rublee of the Tradi I 
mission as members, of the board 
created by Congress to investi 
the railroad eight-hour law. While 
the law docs not go into effect until 
January 1. the President desired the 
members of the board to gh ■ 3 clo i 
study tf> the entire situation. Gen- 
eral Goethals will act as chairman of 
the board. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Domestic and Naval 



The Steamship "Admiral Clark," 
2321 tons, which sank August 16, on 
her way from Port Arthur, Texas, 
to Buenos Aires, was valued at 
$218,750 for insurance. 

The arrival in American waters of 
one or possibly two German sub- 
marines with ample equipment was 
promptly followed by the sinking of 
nine steamers, of which the follow- 
ing wire identified: "Strathdene," 
"\\\st Point," "Stephano," "Kings- 
ton," "Bloomersdijk," "Kristian," 
"Knudscn." 

The Canadian government steamer 
"Montmagny," which lias been be- 
nt-.ith the waters of the St. Lawrence, 
near the Island of Orleans, for al- 
most a year, has been sold by public 
tender to the St. Charles Navigation 
Company, of Quebec, for $25,000. The 
vessel orginally cost over $100,000. A 
contract was some time ago given to 
the Lewis Dredging Company to 
raise the "Montmagny," but they 
were unsuccessful. 

The .Mallory line's new Steamship 
"Henry R.. Mallory" was launched 
August 18 at Newport News. The 
vessel is a passenger and freight 
steamship of about 6000 tons gross, 
14 knots speed, 439 feet long. 54 
feet beam, and 34 feet deep, and will 
have accommodation for 100 first- 
class and 100 third-class passengers. 
She will trade between New York 
and Galveston and will make her 
maiden trip early in December. 

Work on raising the sunken steam- 
ship "Washingtonian," off Fenwick 
Island Lightship, at the entrance of 
the Delaware Capes, has been aban- 
doned. For several weeks wreckers 
have been busy at the scene of the 
wreck trying to raise this craft. ' 
The "Washingtonian" was a new ship I 
when she was sunk about two years 
ago in a collision with the schooner 
"Elizabeth Palmer." The company 
which was to raise the vessel had 
supplied itself with the most modern 
wrecking gear and appliances obtain- 
able, and no expense was spared to 
make the job a success. 

The attempts made by American 
interests to secure boats in Canada 
have been stopped by the action of 
the Government, who have brought 
down an order-in-council prohibiting 
the transfer of any Canadian boats to 
foreign ownership. In shipping 
circles it is believed that this action 
was taken at the request of the 
British government. Negotiations 
had already been completed for 
several boats, but the Canadian gov- 
ernment established a special patrol 
in the lower St. Lawrence to make 
certain that the ordcr-in-council is 
carried out to the letter. Similar 
legislation has been enacted in Aus- 
tralia. 

A new cargo line between Phila- 
delphia and South America has been 
organized with a capital of $1,000,000.1 
The first of the six vessels now in ' 
possession of the company will sail , 
October 15 for Rio Janeiro, Santos, I 
Montevideo and Buenos Aires. The, 
company will be known as the Phil- 
adelphia & South America Steamship 
Corporation, and will operate the 
Philadelphia-South American Line. 
Tt will be financed almost entirely 
by New York capital. Monthly sail- 
en arranged under the 
present schedule, but later, when the 
number of vessels is increased, bi- 
monthly sailings will be undertaken. 
No passengers will be carried. Her- 
man L. Wright of New York is 
president of the corporation. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

THE GERMAN BANK 
Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. Corner Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30th, 1916 
Assets __.---- 

Deposits ------- 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - - - - 

Employees' Pension Fund - - 

Number of Depositors - 



$63,811,228.81 

60,727,194.92 

2,084,033.89 

222,725.43 

68,062 



San Francisco Letter List. 



R. 



Johansson, J. 
. . Johansson, W. 
Letters at the San Francisco Sailors | Johansen, August 
Union Office are advertised for three Johnsen, Gunner 



months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Aliraluunsen, A- Anderson, John 

Abrahamaen, Berner Anderson, N. 



Abrahamsson, W. 
Adelson, John 
Aga, Johan 
Alii, Einar T. 

Ahll'ors, Arthur 
Ahlstrom, Ellis 

i. (has. M. Andersson, L 
Alksen, Charlie Andresen. A. 



Andersson, A. -1782 
Andersson, Ernst 

-1781 
Andersson, G. -1229 
Andersson, Gottfried 
Andersson, J. F. 

H. 

1635 



Alto, John Antonsen, Carl 

Amundsen, Albert Antonsen, Marius 
Amundsen, Amund Apple, August 
Andersen, A. J. -1973Anis, Tobias 
Andersen, C. -1716 Arndt, Paul 
Anderson, C. F. Asklund. Gus. 
Anderson, Ernst Asterman, Oscar 

Andersen, 1'. -1SI6 Aultomen, C. A. 
Andersen, Peder Avelin, Oskar 
Anderson, F. -1473 



Baekstrom, Folke 
Baumeister, John 
n, Edw. 
Henry 
Bengtsson, John 
Benson, Helge 
Bergstrom, A. 

■lsi-11, C. 

Bey, O. -2248 
BJork, Rudolf 
Blum. M. B. 
Bohm, August -1421 



Bolin, Charley 
Bower, G. 
Boyer, R. J. 
Brandt, B. 
Bratt, W. 
Brenen. Win. 
Broihmann, G. 
Buchanan, L. 
Buckley, W. 
Burke, Andrew 
Buse, Alfred 



Capell, H. 
Carlsen, Frank 
Carlsen, Hans 
Carlson, August 

ion, Axel 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Carroll, John J. 
Carter. Sidney 

terg, Gustaf 

■ key," 
Cateches, 
tino 



Chrlstensen, Hans 
Christensen, Louis 
Christensen, Tony 
Christensen, Viggo 
Christiansen, N. 

-1093 
Christoffersen, Alb. 
Cirul. M. 
Clausen, Ingeman 
Conolly, Obirt 
Constan- Contreras. Julius 
Cook, Harry 



Catt, Fred. Corts, Harry 

Cavanagh, J. E. Creely, Tom 
Christensen, Albert Crosby, J. 



Dahlstrom, G. M. 

Dalgard, C. 
Dalley, P. 
I lanielsen, E. 
Danielsen, H. 
Hehler, Fred 
Danielsen, N. 
Danielsen, Sigurd 

Baton, Isaac N. 
Eckhoff, Otto 
Eekstrom. George 
Edman, O. 557 
Eglit, Hans 
Eklund, Gus 
ESkquist, Arvo 
Eichler, Karl 
Eklund. John 
Eliason, C. 
Ellis. B. 

Fagerstrom, Oscar 
Farrell, Bernard 
Ferguson, E. A. 
Fiol. Robert 
Fjellman, J. A. 
Plgved, Sigurd 
Fjellman, Karl 
Fraser, James 

Gaupseth, Sigurd 
Gerald, Willy 
Gibbons, J. 
Gjasdal, lolling 
Goodman, Carroll 
Granberg, Fred 



Davidsen, Hjalmar 
De Klerk, D. -925 
De Roos, J. 
De Vries, Albertus 
Diez, Th. Harry 
Donnelly, J. 
Downey, James 
Dracar, Edgardo 

Ellison, Sam 
El rich t, Fritz 
Engstrom, Edward 
Engstrom, Erik 
Ki> ksen, Ole 
Ericson, Arthur 
Ericsson, M. F. A. 
Erikkila. Vilho 
Erikson, Neils 
Eriksen. Peder C. 
Evensen, Martin 

Fredholm. C. J. 
Fredriksen, F. M. 
Fredrikson. H. 
Freiberg. Peter 
Friedrick, H. 
Fritsch. Leonard 
Fugelutsen, Th. 

Grundman, J. 
Gulbransen, Bjorn 
Gundersen, Jacob 
Gundersen, K. -899 
Gunther, Ted 
Gustafson, Axel 



Granstrom, Nestor Gustafsson, T. 

Grant. Otto Gustavson, Olaf 

Gregersen, John Gutman, Paul 
Gregg, O. F. 

Hagman, Jaik Heiberger. M. B. 

1 hikiinsson, Ingvar Heines. Hugo 
Hallowes. L N. Henderson, Rob 
Halvorsen, H. -2229Henriksen, Charles 
Ilammarquist, A. C.Hering, A. H. K. 

!!• rmansson, C. P. 



Hansen, Carl 
Hansen, Charles 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, F. 
Hansen, N. S. 
Hansen, R. 
Hansen, Viggo 
Hansen, William 
Hansen. Marius 



-1622 

Hetherington, A. T. 
Hetman. Walter 
Hetschel, H. 
Hillsinger, L. B. 
Holme, Adolf 
Hole, Sigvald 
Holmstrom, David 



Hanson. M. -968 Holsen. Henry 
Hansen. W. H. C. Holstrom, D. B. 



Kara, E. -2218 
Haubthoff. Fritz 
decker. Willie 
Hedenskog. John 

Isaacson, George 
Jacobs, Aug. 
Jakobsen, Jakob 
Jaeobsen. J. 
Jarobs, Fred 



Housten. Robert 
Hubert. Emil 
Hugo. Otto 
Huotarl, J. 

Israelsen. Isak 
Jensen, Vigo k. 
Johannesen. Helge 
Johannesen. J. 
Johansen, Fritz 



Jakobsen, Valdemar Johansen. L. -1216 



Jansson, F. J. 
Jenkins, Fred 
Jenning, George 
Jensen, C. -2318 
Jensen, Henry 
Jensen, L. E. 



Johansen. Nikolai 
Johanson, Carl 
.Tohanson. J. 
Johanson, John 
Johanson, N. A. -280 
Johanson, J. -880 



Johnsen, Jakob 
Johnsen, William 



Johnson, Ernst 

Johnson, Evert 

Johnson, 1. 

Johnson, Nels 

Johnson, John 

Johnson, Ole 



Johnson, C. -1300 Jordan, Henry S. 
Johnson, C. E. Josefsen, Ben 



Kaasick, August 
Kahlberg, Billy 
Kaktin. Ed. 
Kallasman, E. 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Kargar, F. 
Kailson, Karl 
Kaspersen, H. - 
Kelly, Patrick 
Kiippin, Mattl 
Klatienhoff, Hans 
Knudsen, Conrad 
Knudsen, David 



Koble, Albin 
Kolustos, A. -1220 
Kolustow, Anton 
Koiz, M. 

Kretachmann, S. M. 
Kristensen, D. K. 
Krlstoffersen, H. 
1100 -1177 

Kruit", Georg 
Kronstrand, 11. T. 
Kroon, P. 
Kuger, Gustav 
Kuhn, John 



Laidstine, Chas. 
Larson, J. 
Larsen, Joliannes 
Larson, Edward 
Larsen, Ingolf 
1..U0, Edvard 
Law, John 
Lebrun. Ernst 
Leelkaln, M. 



Lindholm, Nels 
Lindli, Win. 
Lind, Wilhehii 
Bink, A. 
Loinlng, Herman 
Loland, Louis 
Lorentsen, K. 
Lorln, C. w. 
Lulsten. Chas. 



Lelrewaag, Halvor J. Lundberg, Uskar 



, Hans A. 
Lewis, Peter 
Lidstein, Chas. 
Lindberg, A. J. 
Lindenau, E. 



Lund, J. William 

Lund, Peter 
Lunstedt, Chris. 
Lurtin, i'aul 
Lynch, J. -1586 



Mack, Edward 
Macker, David 

a, C. 
Aladsen, Georg 
Magnuson, Carl 
Makelainen, Anton 
Mangold, A. H. 
Mansfield, Harry 
Markmann, Heinr. 
Markmann, M. -1079Miller, 
Martensen, O. Miller 



McManus, P. 
McPherson, Dan. 
Meigand, Richard 
Meiner, Herman 
Melander, G. L. 
Melder, Johan 
Melson. William 
Mersman, A. 
Meyerdierk, H. 

A. E. 

Criss 



Mathews, R. Mogensen. C. 

Martinez, A. Moller, Dinar 

Martin, H. Moonan, '1 nomas 

Mathieson, Ludvig Monsen, Andrew 

Mayers, Paul M. Monsen, C. 

McCann, J. C. Moritz, Gustav 

McCusken, John Murphy, Geo. 

McGlaslan, W. T. Myrhoj, J. P. 



Nauta, H. 
Nelen, Alf 
Nelsen, Andy 
Nelson, Art 
Nelson, Carl C. 
Nelson, J. P. 
Nelson, N. R. 



Nikand, Henry 
Nilsen, H. -1203 
Nllsen, Hans L. 
Nilsen, N. E. -609 
Nllsen, Oskar J. 
Nilsson, Hilding 
Nilsson, Reinhold 



Nelsson, N. E. -552 Nordstrom, A. 



Nielsen, Harold 
Nielsen, Hugo 
Nielson, H. J. 
Nelson, Win. 
Nerby, Kristian 

Okozin, M. 

Olsen, A. -1303 

Olsen, Adrian 

Olsen, C. A. 

Olsen, Chas. 

Olsen, Fred 

Olsen, H. -885 



Nor. Niels P. 
North, N. P. 
Nowak, Andy 
Nutsen, Gus 
Nygren, Gus 

Olsen, John 

Olsen, L. E. 

Olsen, Olal 

Olsen, O. P. 

1315 Olsen. Oskar 

Olsen. O. I. 

Olsen, R. B. 



-1141 



Olsen, II. -1340 Olson. Frank 

Olsen, Hans Olson. Oscar 

Hans -1225 Olson. Otto 



Olsen, Herman 

Olsen, IngvaUl 

Olsen. J. 

Olsen, John -1222 

Palken, G. 
Palmquist, Albert 
Palquist, Albert 
Parsons, Herman 
Partanen, Johan 
Paul, Chas. 
Paulsen, James 
Pearson, J. A. 
Pedersen, Ole 
Pederson, Charly 
Pedersen, Krist 
Petersen, Aage 
Petersen, Wm. 
Peterson, Conrad 
Pekman, E. 
Peletneky, H. 

Qunilan, Thos. 

Rahl. Willy 

Randropp, John 

Rasmussen, Chester Risgaard. Soren 

Rasmussen, J. -446 Rivera. John 



Opderbeck, Eugen 
Osterhoff. H. 
Overwick. Thomas 

Petersen, A. -1675 
Petersen, Christian 
Peterson, A. 
Peterson, Chas. 
Peterson, F. 
Pettersen, O. H. 
Pettersen. O. W. 
Pettersen. F. -1626 
Pettersson, O. -1551 
rial.. Diedrlck 
Plottner, A. 
Pool, M. 
Post, W. S. 
Pottage, C. E. 
Prlehn. A. 
Fuls, Otto 



Rinkel. H. 

Riesbeck, 1 1 



Rasmussen, L. 
Rasmussen, S. A. 
Reinnold, Ernst 
Reith, Kurt 
Riis, A. 
Ringdal, R. T. 



Roalsen, Fred 
Roden, Knut 
Roester, Waller 
Rogirson, Peter 
Rosberg, N. 
Roster, Hugo 



Ruhr. Hans 
Rundqvist, Oskar 
Runge, Charlie 
Saari. A. 
Samuelsen, I. 
Sandstrom, Gus. 
Sehauer. Wolf 
Schliemann, F. 
Schultz, G. F. W. 

-2926 
Schmidt. G. 
Schneider, E. 
Schutt, W. 
Schwarzlen, Wil- 

helm 
Sederholm, Anton 
Seiffert, Johannes 
Seland, A. 
Semseter, Paul 
Simpson, L. C. 
Sjogren. E. 



Rutsid, Fred 
Ryan, Patrick 
Rytko, Otto 
Skold. C. A. 
S levers, G. P. 
Simonsen. Oskar 
Smedsvik. Oluf 
Smith, J. F. 
Smith, Johan 
Smith. .Max 
Snellman, Tor. 
Sorensen, Viggo 
Steen. Ivar 
Stenberg, Alfred 
Stienen. John 
Stenland, i 
Stinessen, I la raid 
Stohr, Erik C. 
Sverdrup. Thorwald 
Svensson, a 
Swanson, C. -1050 



Skjoldenborg, F. P. Swanson. J. N. 



Tamlsar, P. 
Taube, August 
Tellefssen, A. E. 
Tennyson, F. 
Tho, Johan 
Thompson, 
Thompson, G. E. 
Thompson, Peter 
Thompson, O. 

II ipson, Chas, 

Thompson, T. 

(Jderkull, C. 
[Jlgren, Einar 

Valfre, George 
Van Lubke, John 



Thorsen, Emil 

Thorstensen. B. 
Thorstensen, Then. 
Torstensson, Folke 
Tillman, a. E. 

A. -853 Tonlssen, Peter 
Topel, F. E. 
Torjusen, G. -41 
Trondhjem. F. O. 
Tuck. Wm. 

Clla, Ole O. 
Qlricks, Cristlan 



Veckenstedt, 
Ham 



Wil- 



Van Ryan, I bury Vlckery, Curtis 
Varnsquist, Ernst Villemayer. W. 



Vestvik, Ingolf 

Walentlnson, G. 
Wallgren, 1. M. 

-1314 
Wapper, John 
Walters. H. J. 
Walter. J. 
W.uiis. i . Aug. P. 
Warrer. Harold 
Wene. K. J. 
Werth, Gus 
Welsse. Valdemar 
Werner, Chas. J. 
Westphal, Krnest 
Westvik, lngolv 



Virtonen, Chas. 

Wiken, Erik 
Wikstrom. Anton 
Wikstrom, < 'ail 
Williams. Charlie 
Williams. Fred J. 
Williams ll.ni'. 
Williams, J. F. 
Williams. T. C. 
Williams. William 
Wills, George 
in, George 
Wlnblad, M. 
Winters, Robert 
Wlnther. Hakon II. 



Wi. klund, Toivo I. Wold, Theodore 
Wicklund, T. S. Wyllle, Jas. 
Wiig, Frank 



Zazan, Georg. 
Zerltt, John 
Ziehr, Ernst 



Zirnbauer, Charly 
Zunk, Bruno 



PACKAGES. 

Baker, C. Mikalsen, Andreas 

Berllng, J. B. Olsen, Carl -1101 

Conolly, O. Olsen, H. C. 

Gunvaldsen, Ingvald Olsen, R. B. 
Edman, O. -.">:>7 Olsen. O. J. -1020 
Haave, Norval 
Jansson, A. L. 
Jensen, Henry 
Johansen, Nikolai 
l ,i in i jgaard, ' Seo. 
Lornsen. Crist 
Lundqulst, Frank 



Opderbeck, Eugen 
Pedersen. II. -1263 
Penlngrud. L. 
Rarly, Frans 
Schlacht. Alfred 
Skjoldenbirg. F. P. 
Snellman, Tor 



Mathlsen, H. -1759 Stinessen, Haral.l 



Not Enough. — "My voice is for 
war." 

"But are you willing to offer the 
rest of yourself?" — Boston Transcript. 

Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 
Res., Park 6950 

Office Hours. 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 

7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 

Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICREL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 
Continental Building, on Second Floor 
San Francisco, Cat. 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



J. MILLER 

124 EAST STREET Garfield 690 

Union Store 

HATS, CAPS, 

FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

Suits Steam Cleaned, $1.50 



White Palace Shoe Store 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market, 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest 
Machinery. :: Work Called For and Delivered. 

WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



IS 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 
Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 60 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week, with all modern 
conveniences. Free Hot and Cold Shower 
Bath on every floor. Elevator Service. 
AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up, $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Garfield 833 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished Up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: 25, 30 and 
50 cts. per Day. $1.25 per Week and Up. 
Free Baths — Large Reading Room 
1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 
Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



J0RTALLBR0S.EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



16 FOLSOM STREET 

HOOKS 

Lumber, Crates, Rice, Sugar for all 
kinds of Stevedore Work. 

J. MAHER 



HULTEN $ RUDOLPH 



Formerly Tailor 
for Tom Williams 



Formerly Cutter 
for Tom Williams 

TAILORS 

SUITS TO ORDER 

CLEANING and PRESSING 

39 Sacramento Street Near Market 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 



CLASSY CLOTHIER 
HATTER AND FURNISHER 
DOUGLAS SHOES 
UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



PHONE DOUGLAS 1082 
139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Merchant and Washington 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 

Issued by Authority ot the Cigar Makers' International union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

JtlllS Grilif Hi. that the Ciqars combined inthis boi Mvj nan made by a IllStCljSS WorkMtt 
aMEuecnof !H[ Cigar MMEftS'iNURNAiiONAi union of America, an orjaniMt.on devoted tothead- 
vdntrment of the MOM MATlRlAljrtrJ iNlEiUCIUAl «UIAR[ OF TH[ CRAFT. Therefore «e recommend 
these C'oars to all smokers throuphout the world 

All Inliirroemenu upon this Label will be punished according to law 

f W. (£U<fcu<4, President 

' C tf I V efAmwic a 





News from Abroad. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-11 24 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Resources. $7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Ginty 

S. Bissinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozlo Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Plchon 



To Our Credit. — -"Now," said the 
Sunday School teacher, "can any of 
you tell me what sins of omission 
are?" 

"Yes, ma'am," came the answer. 
"They are the sins we might have 
committed and didn't." — Chicago 
Herald. 



Temporary Objection. — A shoe- 
maker was fitting a customer with 
a pair of boots, when the buyer 
observed that he had but one objec- 
tion to them, which was that the 
soles were a little too thick. 

"If that is all," replied the shoe- 
maker, "put on the boots and the 
objection will gradually wear away." 
—Tit-Bits. 



A Real Hero.— Little Willie— Gee, 
you're awful proud of your grand- 
pop, ain't you? 

Bobbie — You betcha! Why he 
used to lick pop reg'lar. — Widow. 



PRACTICAL NAVIGATION 

Taught by a practical Navigator. Only 
a limited number of students will be 
accepted, as the teaching will be Indi- 
vidual. For rates and other information 

Address, 

H. HEINKE 

NAVIGATION INSTRUCTOR 
Spain and 2d Streets Sonoma, Cal. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 
and 

17 STEUART STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Business Sense. — "Has Dasher in- 
creased his literary output since he 
adopted efficiency methods?" 

"Yes; he saves all the phrases 
discarded in the final draft of his 
stories, combines them in dozen lots, 
and sells them as vers libre." — Life. 



The Law's Fault. — Geordie had a 
small dog, and was summoned for 
keeping a dog without a license. 
He pleaded it was only a pup. 
"How old do you say he is?" 
asked the magistrate's clerk. "Aa 
divven knaa exactly," replied Geordie. 
"But he's onny a pup." Expert evi- 
dence, however, proved it to be a dog 
and Geordie was duly fined. As 
Geordie was leaving the court he 
turned to his wife and remarked: 
"Hang me if Aa can understand it. 
Aa said the seym thing last year, 
and the year before, and they let 
me off. Noo they fine me. Aa sup- 
pose somebody's been messin' aboot 
with the law!" — Newcastle (Eng.) 
Chronicle. 



Close Work. — The Irish Republic- 
lasted just long enough to enable 
"The Fatherland" to get in a demand 
that the United States recog.uze it. — 
Buffalo Express. 



The Swedish Premier announced 
that his country is still strictly neu- 
tral, though he declared that his 
country was in line with America in 
protests against the British black- 
list. 

The German Chancellor was the 
object of severe attacks in the 
Reichstag, but it was stated that lie 
had the support of the military party 
and would probably win. His op- 
ponents want diver warfare resumed 
upon the old basis of a disregard of 
neutral protests. 

That submarine diver warfare is 
again in full swing was evidenced in 
the sinking of an unusually large 
number of steamers, including the 
Cunard liner "Franconia," a trans- 
port of 25,000 tons. Spain and other 
neutrals were said to be indignant at 
the torpedoing of so many of their 
ships. 

The bridge across the St. Law- 
rence River at Quebec suffered an 
accident on the 11th, destroying a 
number of lives. The central span, 
640 feet long and weighing 5000 
tons, while being lifted from pon- 
toons to its place in the bridge, fell 
into the river, drowning a number 
of workmen. A span in the same 
bridge collapsed nine years ago, 
killing 70 people. 

After being "seized" by a German 
submarine, the American barque 
"Prins Valdemar" has left Swine- 
munde minus her cargo of oil cake 
and foodstuffs, ostensibly bound for 
Sweden. The firm which despatched 
this vessel from San Francisco has 
already been blacklisted, but the 
same course has been followed in 
the past by other ships whose owners 
do not figure on the blacklist. The 
great advantage of sailing vessels is 
that they cannot be hung up for lack 
of bunkers at a coaling station. 

Though apparently a baseless ru- 
mor, the most sensational story of 
the week was that concerning Am- 
bassador Gerard, who was alleged 
to be bearing a message from Ger- 
many requesting the President to use 
his good offices in suing for peace 
with the allies. Washington was 
skeptical; Von Bernstorff made em- 
phatic denial, antl on the face of 
things the statement was extremely 
improbable. If entrusted with such 
a message, Gerard would not break 
faith by any premature disclosure, 
and German diplomacy is nothing if 
not secret. 

On the western fronts the allies 
made substantial gains, improving 
their positions along the line be- 
tween Peronne and Baupaume. Ger- 
many now freely admits the terri- 
torial losses on the Somme, but 
contends that the area won by the 
allies is trifling compared with llicir 
losses in men, the same heing set 
down as half a million, a figure not 
much in excess of the admissions of 
France and England. Allowing for 
the fact that territory is only a de- 
tail, it docs seem as though the allies 
are paying dearly for their progress. 
England virtually admits this in her 
call for more men and in the talk 
of applying conscription to Ireland. 
This latter course is one threatened 
with the gravest possibilities, if one 
may accept the statements of Red- 
mond, the Irish leader. Redmond 
was the first to denounce the folly 
of the petty rebellion in Dublin, but 
lie is also among the first to warn 
England that conscription might in- 
volve a revolt of all Ireland. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits. 



Quicker Now— "Why is it wc don't 
hear any more complaints about de- 
fective life-preservers on ships?" 

"Nobody has time to put them 
on." — Judge. 



Friendly Interest— Grad— This Uni- 
versity certainly takes an interest in 
a fellow, doesn't it? 

Tad— How's that? 

Grad— Well, I read that "they 
would be very jjlad to hear of the 
death of any of their alumni."— 
Siren. 



The Man Higher Up.— "The old- 
fashioned boy used to respect e 
word his father said." 

"Yes," replied the rather cynical 
youth; "but you must remember 
that the old-fashioned boy had one 
of those old-fashioned fathers." — 
Washington Star. 



Strategy.— Mrs. Exe — You always 
have such wonderful success in get- 
ting people to come to your par- 
ties. 

Mrs. Wye— Oh, I always tell the 
men that it's not to be a dress-up 
affair, and the women that it is. — 
Boston Transcript. 



Not Reckless.— Percy Ames, who is 
just back from the warring side of 
the world, says a mustering officer — 
a sergeant — met on the street of an 
English-coast village a strapping, up- 
standing youngster of twenty-one or 
thereabouts. The noncom. hailed him: 

"See 'ere, me lad," he said, "are 
you in gocul 'ealth?" 

"I are," stated the youth. 

"Are you married?" 

"I aren't." 

" 'Ave you any one dependent on 
you?" 

"I 'ave not." 

"Then your king and country need 
you. Why don't you enlist?" 

The youth stared at the sergeant, 
round-eyed. 

"Wot?" he said. "With this 
bloomin' war goin' on? You must 
think I'm a silly fool." — Saturday 
Evening Post. 



Secure and Profitable 

The wise man keeps part of his 
money in a reliable savings bank. If 
you are making money now, why not 
put aside something for a rainy day? 

Savings and Commercial Depts. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 






Upholding American 
PROSPERITY 





Union Label of the 
UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are 
counterfeits. 

JOHN W. SCULLEY, President MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary-Treasurer 

Rooms 72-73 Bible House, New York City 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 
NOTICE! BOSS OF ROAD 
OVERALLS— PRICE, 80 CENTS 

Phone Douglas 1737 



The key to Prosperity Is Saving! 
So make up your mind to prosper 
by buying one of Hale's $1.00 Banks 
for only 50c. It la the best possible 
way to teach the children thrift and 
the vital principles of saving. We 
keep the key, and you can only open 
the Bank by bringing it to Hale's. 
Do what you wish with the money. 
Banks on Sale at Transfer Desk. 




Market at Fifth 



Demand the Union Label 



Did you ever stop to think that 
there is from one-half to one ounce 
more Tobacco in the 10c Pouches 
GOLD SHORE CUT PLUG 
SMOKING than in the advertised 
10c tins, and not any better Tobacco 
grows than the BAGLEY CO. put 
in GOLD SHORE. Why buy tin 
cans to throw away, when the pouch 
is so much more practical as a pocket 
package, and contains more Tobacco? 



urviorv 



Christensen's Navigation School 

Established 1906 

ON AND AFTER JAN. 1, 1916, CHRISTENSEN'S NAVIGATION SCHOOL 
WILL BE LOCATED AT ROOMS 353-355-357-359, HANSFORD BLDG 
ENTRANCE AT 25 CALIFORNIA AND 268 MARKET STS. 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 




LVNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 

in 4 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



H. SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 

FURNISHING GOODS 



693 THIRD STREET, San Francisco 



WE HAVE NO BRANCH STORES— ONLY ONE BIG STORE 
Watch Repairing Guaranteed Two Years 

The Popular Price Jewelry Store 

715 MARKET STREET Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 




^jJ^j^ojaJ MADE 




Jewelers, Watchmakers and 



games JiSorensem Opticians 

14JVM. ana J/-eajj ' 

Everything Bought or Repaired at Our Store is Positively Guaranteed 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CWAt CO., MANUPAtTUBCKS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



"YOUR HATTER" 
FRED AMMANN 



72 MarKet Street 
San Francisco 



Union Hats 



CtffTBUSfEU 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



s 1 





/ i V «i 







y 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXX, No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1916. 



Whole No. 2404. 



THE BRITISH TRADE-UNION CONGRESS. 



A Synopsis of Its More Important Transactions. 



As indicated in cable dispatches the recent 
session of the British Trade-Union Congress at 
Birmingham was marked by a very emphatic 
refusal of British labor to parley with German 
labor, even when peace negotiations were being 
considered. 

In the report of the Parliamentary Committee 
it was recommended that the Congress should 
send delegates to an International Trade-Union 
Congress at the same time and place as the 
meeting of the plenipotentiaries who will be 
arranging terms. The scheme originated at the 
San Francisco convention of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, the President of which, Samuel 
Gompers, drew up a circular letter dated March 
26, 1916, to be sent to all the national labor 
movements of the world, inviting them to send 
delegates. The congress, it was proposed, should 
use any opportunity that presented itself to 
further the working interests in connection with 
the terms of peace. 

The discussion, which took place upon this 
proposal, is of more than passing interest as it 
shows the intense feeling of the organized Brit- 
ish wage-earners toward their fellow workers in 
Germany. 

W. Thorne, M. P., a member of the Parlia- 
mentary Committee, said the recommendation 
should not be passed without a clear under- 
standing of what it involved. A congress of 
labor delegates from the Allies and the neutral 
countries was all right, but it would be absurd 
to have delegates from Germany, Austria. 
Turkey and Bulgaria at a congress to advise 
these plenipotentiaries upon the tewns of peace. 

Prospects of Peace Remote. 

Ninety-nine per cent, of the people of Britain 
would oppose any government which attempted 
to make terms of peace before every German 
had been cleared out of Belgium and France. 

C. G. Amnion (Postal Employes) and one of 
the fraternal delegates from the congress to 
the recent American convention at San Fran- 
cisco said that the American Federation of 
Labor intended that the proposed International 
Labor Congress should be representative of the 
workers of all the belligerent nations, that the 
workers who were suffering in every country 
should be called together at the end of the 
war to consider ways and means of making 
such a tragedy impossible in the future. When 
the fighting was over, he emphatically declared, 
the. German working man, like the British work- 
ing man. would still have his work to do in 
the world, and would find that he and his 
dependents were suffering even more than those 
here. The German workers were no more to 
blame for the great catastrophe which had come 
upon the world than the British workers were 
able to prevent the imposition of Prussian in- 
stitutions here. Amid cheers and booing Mr. 
Ammon declared that under the cloak of a 
spurious patriotism the workers of the belliger- 
ent countries were being played off against one 
another. 

Jack Jones (General Workers^ said that be- 
fore the war the German Socialists who came 
to Trade-Union Congresses promised when they 



returned to vote against war supplies, but when 
they did get back they voted unanimously in 
favor of the war credits. They were the only 
people who "sold" the International Labor 
movement. Under the plea that they were 
afraid of invasion, they decided to invade, and 
on the altar of liberty they sacrificed liberty. 
He was an Internationalist, but he was not 
an anti-nationalist. Let the allied workers decide 
and, if the Germans wanted, let them come 
along afterward to shake hands. 

Replies from the Central Powers. 

J. Hill (Boilermakers) said there was no 
division in the committee when this recom- 
mendation was drawn up, though Mr. Thorne 
was there. It was quite clear to him that 
the invitations had been sent out to all the 
belligerent nations, and he knew some of the 
replies that had been sent. The Central Powers 
had replied that they were under a government 
of absolutism which they hoped to alter at the 
end of the war, and that they doubted the 
possibility of holding a conference, because 
some time would elapse before the relaxation 
of the present restrictions which war put upon 
them all. Moreover, they added, their direct 
influence at such a conference would possibly 
carry no weight. In spite of this it was 
advisable that a conference should be held 
in order that labor might say what in its 
opinion ought to be incorporated in the terms 
of peace. 

T. McKerrell (Miners' Federation) asked 
whether the Socialists of Germany who might 
attend this conference would be the Socialists 
whom the Kaiser sent to Belgium after the 
massacres to persuade the Belgian people that 
they ought to welcome German rule, and if so 
whether the Belgian workmen who escaped 
massacre would sit in the same room. Would 
the French miners, whose homes had been in 
the possession of the Germans for two years 
and whose wives and daughters had been ab- 
ducted, be represented there? If so, he saw 
the prospect of a very pleasant and harmonious 
gathering. When German democracy had dis- 
sociated itself from the crime of the sinking 
of the "Lusitania," Mr. McKerrell added amid 
loud cheers, and had at least tried to bring to 
justice the criminals who had killed women and. 
children, then it would be nossiblc for British 
labor to call it "comrade." 

Blaming the German Socialists. 

G. Roberts, M. P., said the British workers 
would not sanction any negotiations with the 
German Social Democrats or their government 
until the German democracy had purged them- 
selves of Kaiserdom and all for which it 
stood. The German Socialist, like the German 
people as a whole, believed in militarism as a 
means of dominating the world. If this pro- 
posal were persisted in it would mean, for 
generations to come, the biggest split in the 
British labor movement that they had e\ i r 
dreamed of. 

T. Shaw (Weavers) moved that the recom 
mendation be referred back, adding that he 
would talk about international, sm when the 



people of Belgium and France were free from 
the domination of the oppressor. A motion for 
the entire deletion of the recommendation was 
then carried by 1,486,000 votes to 723,000. 

A resolution aimed at protecting women 
workers on war service by fixing minimum 
wages, granting equal pay for equal work, and 
other measures, was carried after a powerful 
speech by Miss Mary Macarthur. The congress 
also emphatically approved of the formation of a 
ministry of labor, but showed considerable sensi- 
tiveness regarding the drafting of soldiers into 
civilian labor. 

The anxiety of British trade unionists in re- 
gard to the element of compulsion introduced by 
the^ Military Service and Munitions Act was 
indicated by the introduction of the following 
resolution, which was adopted: "That this 
Trade-Union Congress views with grave mis- 
giving the introduction of compulsory military 
service into Great Britain. This country having 
always been the chief stronghold against tyranny 
and oppression, personal, industrial, and mili- 
tary, hereby instructs the Parliamentary Com- 
mittee to lose no opportunity after the war to 
press for the repeal of all acts of Parliament 
imposing economic, industrial and military com- 
pulsion upon the manhood of the nation, and 
to re-establish individual liberty, with the right 
voluntarily to refrain from organized destruc- 
tion." 

Re-establishing Individual Liberty. 

Mr. Godfrey (Vehicle Workers), who intro- 
duced the foregoing resolution, urged that they 
should show the Government that they did 
not intend to be slaves to military control 
when hostilities ccasccl. J. Cross "(Northern 
Counties Weavers), who seconded, said the peo- 
ple only became conscriptionists by the force of 
events, and when the crisis was passed they 
would demand that compulsion should be re- 
pealed. W. Thorne, M. P., said he was now, 
as years ago, a believer in a citizen army for 
home defense. He believed that every man 
should l»e trained not only to protect his 
home, but to protect himself in case of the 
use of troops to put down strikes. As to the 
repeal of the emergency legislation, there would 
be a general, election within six months of the 
end of the war, and if the wage earners again 
sent their masters to Parliament to make laws 
for them they would be bigger fools than he 

tool them to be. 

J. 11. Thomas, M. P., believed there wns 
a great danger that the conscription act! would 
be used as a lever for creating a permanent 
standing army of conscript lads, and he hoped 
therefore, that labor would make an undivi 
demand for the repeal of those acts It vv.nl.' 
be far better to make one determined stand, 
even by an industrial strike through. OUtl 

try, than to allow their fn md privili 

I., be thrown away under the prctc\ 
in militarism. 

Robert Smillie (Miners' Federation) moved 
a resolution in favoi Up '> new joint 

board, the most important lab in the 

country, consisting of thi Parliamentary Com- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



mittee of the Trades-Union Congress and the 
national labor party executive committee, thus 
eliminating the General Federation of Trade 
Unions. 

There were 2,850,000 members affiliated to the 
Trades-Union Congress, 2,093,000 to the Labor 
party, and 8/4,000 to the General Federation of 
Trade Unions, Mr. Smillie pointed out. Of the 
societies connected with the General Federation, 
52 with 641,000 members were affiliated in the 
congress, and 37 with 737,000 members were 
cted with the Labor party, leaving 279 
societies with a total membership of only 72,600 
not connected with the congress or the party. 
The miners had no desire to attack the General 
ition. But they held that as only 72,600 of 
its 874,000 members were not already connected 
with the congress or the Labor party, it ought 
not to be a third party in a joint board of 
the trade union and labor movement. 

J. II. Thomas, M. P., on behalf of the rail- 
waymen supported the resolution. G. H. Roberts, 
M. P., one of the representatives of the Labor 
party on the joint board, opposed the resolu- 
tion,' remarking that he wanted to see the three 
bodies merged into one and the whole forces 
of labor co-ordinated. Instead of that, the 
expulsion of the federation from the joint 
board would split the movement and make 
unity impossible for a generation to come. B. 
Tillett also opposed the motion, which 
however, carried by 1,570,000 votes to 1,095,000. 

After the War Problems. 

The congress adopted the dock laborers' 
resolution requiring the government to provide 
for the employment of men on demobilization, 
by the reinstatement of those able to do their 
former work, and the securing of suitable em- 
ployment for those who were unfit for their old 
upations. 

A resolution supported by the London So- 
ciety of Compositors declared that every effort 
should be made to preserve industrial peace 
after the war, and with this object the Par- 
liamentary Committee were instructed to ap- 
proach the government ami the Employers' Par- 
liamentary Association to discuss terms having 
this aim in view; including a compulsory 
48-hour working week in every occupation, a 
compulsory minimum wage of 30s. for all adult 
workers, and compulsory membership of trade 
unions for all workers. 

Another most interesting discussion took place 
on a motion instructing the Parliamentary 
Committee, in view of the attempts now being 
made to capture the support of the trade 
union movement for a change in Great Britain's 
fiscal policy, with protection as the main ob- 
jective, to circulate a manifesto demonstrating 
that the industrial, economic and social interests 
of this country could best be preserved by a 
series of reforms which were enumerated. 

J. Stokes (Glassblowers) moved a number of 
amendments which were carried by 1,642,000 to 
619,000 involving the deletion of the reference 
to protection, the inclusion of a reference to 
attempts to capture the support of the move- 
ment by Free Traders, and the addition to the 
paragraph relating to sweating of the following 
w • irds: 

"And as one means to this end methods should 
be adopted which will restrict or prevent the 
importation of cheap manufactured goods which 
have been produced at lower rates of wages, 
or worse labor conditions, than those prevailing 
in this country." 

Genuine Industrial Preparedness. 

The resolution which was then carried as 
amended by 1,739,000 votes to 500,01)0 read as 
iws: 

"In view of the attempts now being made by 
laissez faire free traders and protectionists 
to capture the support of the trade union move- 
ment, tlie Parliamentary Committee be in- 
structed to prepare and circulate a manifesto 
demonstrating that in our opinion the industrial, 
economic, and social interests of this country 
can best he preserved ( 1 I by the expansion of 
our educational system, making provision for 
the proper physical and mental training of 
every child, including an improved system of 
technical education; (2) the abolition of sweating 
in all industries, trade and employments, and 
the maintenance of an industrial system under 
which the physical and mental efficiency of the 
worker shall not be sacrificed for the profit of 
the employer; and as one means to this end 
methods should be adopted which will restrict 
or prevent the importation of cheap manu- 
factured goods which have been produced at 
lower rates of wages or under worse labor con- 
ditions than those prevailing in this country; 
(3) the destruction of insanitary areas and the 
establisment of housing conditions by which in- 
creased possibilties of health and happiness for 
the people can be secured; (4) the abolition of 
all forms of monopoly in our natural resources 
whereby their existence provides income without 
service, with a corresponding burden upon the 
industrial activities of the community." 

Employment of Asiatics Opposed. 
Havelock Wilson (Sailors and Firemen) moved 
a resolution expressing alarm at the increased 
oyment of Chinese and cheap Asiatic labor 
on British ships during the war. and calling 
Upon the government to introduce a bill for 
the repatriation of all Chinese who cannot pro- 



duce satisfactory evidence proving that they are 
of British nationality. 

The resolution was agreed to after some 
startling facts had been disclosed as to the 
spread of the Chinese inland and the evils as- 
sociated with this immigration. 

The "conscription of wealth" resolution was 
passed unanimously. Its terms were as follows: 
"That, as the manhood of the nation has been 
conscripted to resist foreign aggression, the 
maintenance of freedom, and the protection of 
capital, this congress demands that such a 
proportion of the accumulated wealth of the 
country shall be immediately conscripted as is 
necessary to defray the financial liability in- 
curred by the prosecution of the war, and thus 
avoid borrowing huge loans, upon which enor- 
mous sums will have to be paid in interest by 
future generations, which will handicap the 
industries of the country in national and inter- 
national competition, diminish trade, and im- 
poverish the people. 

"And further, this congress instructs the Par- 
liamentary Committee to initiate a huge cam- 
paign for the purpose of accomplishing the 
foregoing object, and to demand immedi- 
atelj from the government a census of 
wealth: (a) Banking accounts and balances; (b) 
currency: (c) the capital estimate of the whole 
material ( 1 ) productive, (2) transport and 
distributive wealth, and the whole of the profits 
appertaining thereto; (d) an estimate of the 
value of property and real estate and other 
forms representing rents, interest and profit." 

Co-operative Movement Favored. 
At its final sitting, the Trade-Union Congress 
agreed to the following resolution which is im- 
portant in view of the possibilities of big de- 
velopments in the co-operative movement in the 
near future: This congress is of opinion that 
the development of the co-operative movement is 
essential to a militant trade-union movement, 
and invites the co-operative congress to ap- 
point a committee of six to meet a similar 
number appointed by this congress to prepare 
plans for mutual assistance in developing the 
productive, distributive, and banking activities of 
the co-operative movement, always providing 
that the co-operative movement, as represented 
by the Co-operative Union, Limited, is prepared 
cognize the trade union rate of wages and 
conditions of employment as laid down by the 
trade unions affiliated to the Trade-Union Con- 
gress. 



in the government service, will command 
the "Paris" of her first voyage to this 
country, soon after the war ends. 



THE NEW "PARIS." 



Details of the construction and equip- 
ment of the "Paris," the latest addition to 
the French line (Compagnie Gcnerale 
Transatlantique) , indicate that the new- 
vessel, besides being one of the largest 
afloat, will be one of the safest and most 
luxurious. Despite the war the construc- 
tion of the vessel, which was begun soon 
before the outbreak of hostilities, the vessel 
was launched September 12. The "Paris" 
i- 760 feet long, 85 feet beam and has a 
depth of 59 feet. She is of 37,000 tons dis- 
placement, and will be driven by turbo- 
reciprocating machinery with quadruple 
screws. There are nine decks, four of 
which stretch the entire length of the 
vessel. One of these, which can be in- 
closed in t;la>s during inclement weather, 
will be used for dancing when so desired. 
All the latest improvements in safety de- 
vices will be installed, including submarine 
signaling apparatus, wireless direction 
tinders and improved lifeboat launching 
system. All the cabins and the purser's 
department will be in telephonic touch 
through a central switchboard. The scheme 
of interior decoration will follow that of the 
"France," of the same line. Three passen- 
ger elevators will be installed. A palm 
garden and an open air cafe will add to 
the entertainment of the passengers, and a 
miniature theatre will be provided for the 
children. The "Paris" will have accom- 
modations for 485 first, 476 second and 920 
third cabin passengers, as well as a steer- 
age capable of holding 1118 persons. Her 
crew will number 685 officers and men. It 
is understood that Commandant Poncelet, 
the senior captain of the French line, who 
at present is in command of the "France," 



GETTING RICH IN THE NAVY. 



There are other advantages to being an 
enlisted man in the Navy than having 
a wife in every port, if we are to believe 
the conversation picked up around a re- 
cruiting station. And, strangely enough, 
it is the idea of growing rich, one of the 
thoughts furthest from the minds of the 
ordinary man entering the Navy, which 
seems to be the greatest drawing-card. At 
least that looms largest in the minds of 
the men who are doing the recruiting. 
There is a glamour to the tar's life, a ro- 
mance to his adventures. Moreover, the 
chance to go about the globe, and see some- 
thing of foreign shores is alluring to many, 
even though it is sandwiched in between 
endless decks to wash and eternal brasses 
to polish. In the Harrisburg Telegraph, a 
recruiting officer tells of the financial ad- 
vantage of going into naval service. It 
ought to appeal greatly to the man who 
is without responsibility, and to whom the 
prospect of ever having stacked up $30,000 
is classed along with owning a flying- 
carpet and other such tales of the unreal. 
Our recruiting officer says: 

"Do you want to retire at the age of 50 
with $28,788.70. and have an income of 
at least $104 a month for the remainder of 
your life? 

"If you do, join the United States Navy. 

"The American sailors are the best paid 
in the world, and after thirty years of 
service (it may be twenty-five years if a 
bill now pending passes Congress) the 
man-o'-warsman is retired on a pay of not 
less than $104 a month, and, in addition, 
should have saved $28,788.70 from his 
monthly pay. 

'" A young man enlisting at the age of 
18 as an apprentice seaman will be paid 
$17.60 a month during six months spent 
at training station and receive an increase 
to $20.90 a month when he boards a ship. 
By the end of his first enlistment, under 
ordinary course of advancement, he should 
be receiving $33 a month, and meanwhile 
he is outfitted with clothes and all necessi- 
ties. If he re-enlists within four months 
after the expiration of his first enlistment, 
he will receive a seven-dollar monthly in- 
crease in pay, and a bonus of four months' 
pay in addition. If by the end of his sec- 
ond enlistment he should have received a 
good-conduct medal (which adds 83 cents 
a month to his pay), he should be receiv- 
ing $55 a month. After twelve years he 
should have reached chief petty officer's 
pay with a salary of $99.62 a month, and 
thereafter his pay is increased with each 
enlistment. Good-conduct and other medals 
for meritorious services also add to his 
pay. Under ordinary courses, according 
to the figures furnished by the Navy De- 
partment, a sailor usually saves one-half of 
his pay, which is deposited in the ship's 
bank, receiving 4 per cent, interest. Thus, 
beginning at the lowest level in the Navy 
and reaching the highest point in the serv- 
ice as an enlisted man, after the end of 
twelve years and continuing in this ca- 
pacity for sixteen years, the average sailor 
retires after thirty years of service with a 
pension of $104 a month, besides having 
the $28,000 or more in addition." 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



To Teach Foreign-Born. 

In a bulletin issued by the Federal Bu- 
reau of Education, Dr. P. P. Claxton, Com- 
missioner of Education, calls attention to 
the large number of illiterate immigrants 
in this country and predicts that after 
the European war immigration to this 
country will probably attain its former 
level. He says, in part : 

"In 1910 there were in the United States 
more than 13,000,000 of foreign-born men, 
women and children, and more than four- 
fifths of those coming in that year were 
from southern and eastern European coun- 
tries and other countries in which the 
percentage of illiteracy is very large. 
Nearly 3,000,000 of these foreign-born men, 
women and children over 10 years of age 
were unable to speak the English language, 
and more than 1,600,000 were unable to 
read and write in any language. The four 
years following the census year of 1910 
added largely to all these classes, the av- 
erage immigration for these years being 
more than 1,000,000 annually. The tide 
has receded since the beginning of the 
war in Europe, but it will probably at- 
tain its former level and more when the 
war is over. 

"For their good and our own we must 
not let these people remain among us 
either as citizens or aliens without giving 
them adequate opportunity and every 
proper inducement to learn the language 
of the country and whatever else may be 
necessary to enable them to understand 
the best in American social, industrial and 
civic life." 



Lemieux Act Condemned by Canadians. 

The Canadian Industrial Disputes In- 
vestigation law — known as the Lemieux 
act — was blown sky high by the Ca- 
nadian Trades and Labor Congress conven- 
tion, in session at Toronto, Ontario. 

By an almost unanimous vote the con- 
vention called upon the government to 
repeal this legislation. 

The Lemieux act was passed in 1907 
and served as a model for legislation 
passed by the last Colorado State Legis- 
lature, which has since been repudiated 
by the Federation of Labor of that State. 
Under the Lemieux act it is illegal for 
workers employed in a public utility to 
leave their employment until the govern- 
ment has appointed a commission to in- 
vestigate their grievance. 

In opposing the act, delegates to the 
Trades and Labor Congress used some of 
the strongest terms ever heard in a Do- 
minion trade union meeting. Former sup- 
porters of the act acknowledged they had 
new viewpoints, and that close contact with 
its operation convinced them that it was 
impossible for labor organizations to at- 
tain the goal for which they arc strug- 
gling when forced to accept the law as a 
means of adjusting differences with em- 
ployers. It was charged that the govern- 
ment used the act to curtail the power of 
organized labor. Delegates referred to the 
law as "the lemon act," and that "it is 
all for the other fellow." Delegate Irvine 



of the miners said : "I have never known 
the employers to be put to a disadvantage, 
but the employees have been." 

Delegate Sinclair, who is also an officer 
of the Amalgamated Association of Street 
Railway Employees, called attention to 
claims in the United States that "the 
workingmen of Canada are gloriously satis- 
fied with the Lemieux act." 

"This congress should tell the working- 
men of the United States," said Sinclair, 
"that the wage earners of the Dominion 
are opposed to it." 

The cabinet of the Dominion government 
was vigorously bombarded during the dis- 
cussion. It was charged that aliens, held 
at a detention camp because of the war, 
were forced to break the strike of Thetford 
miners who were demanding higher wages 
when the price of asbestos had jumped 
from $200 to $600 a ton. Minister of Labor 
Crothers, who addressed the convention on 
behalf of the law, said he was not re- 
sponsible for the acts of the cabinet. It 
was also charged that the conciliator ap- 
pointed by the government in this case 
was a stockholder in one of the Thetford 
asbestos companies. To this the minister 
of labor also pleaded ignorance. 

Repudiation of the widely-heralded law 
by Canadian organized workers is a hard 
jolt to employers who have depended upon 
this legislation to tie men to their jobs 
while they jockeyed to defeat their workers' 
demands by continued delay or, if neces- 
sary, by open repudiation of the award of 
government commissions. Under this law 
it was illegal to even feed strikers who 
had not complied with the act. In one 
Nova Scotia case an official of a trade 
union was fined for paying for groceries 
out of the funds of the union. He was 
found guilty of "encouraging strikers." 
His defense that the strikers were starving 
was set aside. 



Many Foreigners Used to Break Strike. 

Striking packing house workers of St. 
Louis, Mo., charge the struck companies 
with having perfected a "silent system" 
in their plants. The scheme consists of 
making up the gangs of the different de- 
partments of many nationalities, so that 
one group does not understand the lan- 
guage of another. 

The foremen of these gangs, generally 
rough-necks and slave drivers of the old 
school, do not hesitate to knock down 
the Pole or the Greek because he knows 
that the rest of the gang, the Russ, the 
Servian, the Hungarian, the negro, the 
Bohemian and other nationalities are sus- 
picious and jealous of the victim of the 
foreman's brutality and that he will get 
no sympathy from them. 

The strike started when 3i unorganized 
employes of the Cox & Gordon Company 
asked that wages be raised from 20 to 
22/2 cents an hour. They worked from 
60 to 66 hours a week. The request was 
refused and the workers joined the Meat 
Cutters and Butcher Workmen's Union. 
The company then appealed to the M<.n 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemcene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
l.eiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Repostcros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Rcmandorcs, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Ccntro Maritimo dos Empregados cm Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



Labor in the State of Yucatan 
Mexico, has been organized in the 
following trades: Electricians, car- 
penters, seamen, bakers, masons, ho- 
tel and restaurant clerks and cooks, 
commercial clerks, smeltermen, hack- 
men, railroad men and machinists, 
blacksmiths and boilcrmakers. 

It is announced that women, as 
well as men, are now to be em- 
ployed as factory inspectors in Prus- 
sia, 15 having been appointed al- 
ready. The main stipulation made 
is that applicants should have ob- 
tained first-hand knowledge of the 
conditions of industrial life by work- 
ing in a factory for some length of 
time. 

Owing to the constant and in- 
creasing need of wood and the prob- 
lems of labor and supply the home- 
grown timber committee in Scotland 
recently approached the boys' schools 
with a request for volunteer labor 
during the vacation. The boys have 
responded with enthusiasm, and a 
movement has been organized 
amongst the different schools and 
camps where the boys are working 
under supervision and according to 
a well-organized plan. They rapidly 
gain efficiency in felling, cutting and 
dressing the timber and the scheme 
promises to be a great success in 
every way. 

A recent Consular Report gives 
the following interesting information 
about labor conditions in France: 
"Until Italy declared war on Austria- 
Hungary there was an abundant sup- 
ply of unskilled labor in the Mar- 
seille district. The Italian mobiliza- 
tion resulted in the withdrawal of 
about 15,000 workmen, including the 
majority of the wharf laborers and 
a large percentage of factory hands. 
These were all replaced, however, 
within a few months. The number 
of women employed in the various 
local industries has steadily in- 
creased, and female labor is now 
predominant in factories and com- 
mercial establishments. Most of the 
street-car conductors in Marseille 
are women, an innovation that has 
been entirely successful. Wages in 
the principal industries are on the 
whole about 40 per cent, higher than 
before the war, and in the case, of 
skilled workmen the increase aver- 
ages 150 per cent." 

In Scotland as elsewhere women 
have at the present time been 
given many opportunities of proving 
their usefulness and adaptability in 
various departments of labor which 
formerly were considered to belong 
exclusively to men. The more fa- 
miliar forms of war service, of 
course, have been taken up by 
women, who as munition workers, 
canteen assistants and in other emer- 
gency capacities, are proving a val- 
uable asset in the industrial re- 
sources of the country. In Edin- 
burgh and Leith there are, at the 
time of writing, about 385 women 
who have licenses to drive motor 
cars and cycles, and a number of 
these women are doing well, both on 
private cars and public vans. In the 
city women are more extensively 
employed in banks and insurance 
offices. With regard to agricultural 
work, last year the housing accom- 
modation was one of the chief hin- 
drances to the employment of 
women in this work, but in many 
places conditions have improved and 
women are showing their usefulness 
in many directions. 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON STREETS .... SAN PEDRO 



HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS phone w j 

NATIONAL HOTEL 

MRS. ALBERT H. RYAN, Prop. 

FURNISHED ROOMS 

50c Per Day and Up — $2 Per Week and Up 

No. 270 FOURTH STREET SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



San Pedro Letter List. 



REMOVAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 

S. G. SWANSON & BEST ffT TAILORING left* 

who has been established since 1904 on Beacon Street, between 6th and 7th 

IS NOW located on the 2nd floor BANK OF SAN PEDRO BLDG., 
entrance 110 WEST 6th STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL., 

Where he Is better prepared, because of Much lesser rent, to give the trade the 
advantage of lower prices and as formerly, special care is given to garments en- 
trusted to him for Cleaning, Repairing and Pressing. 

Note — Clothes also cut, trimmed and made from your own cloth with the 
Union Label too. The new woolens are now ready for your Inspection, how about 
your order7 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



Mills, Elbert a Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 
FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers In — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Hans Nilson, a native of Tons- 
berg, Norway, was last heard from 
at Mobile, Ala., is inquired for by 
his mother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts kindly notify Louis 
Donald, Norwegian Vice Consul, 77 
St. Francis St., Mobile, Ala. 12-22-15 



A SAILOR'S BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA- FARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 It purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, the bank 

carries on hand at all times an ample supply of Swedish, Norwegian 

and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



John Edstrom, alias Brynjulf Ed- 
strom, born in Norway in 1879, was 
last heard from at Mobile, Ala., 
where his address was Norwegian 
Chapell, is inquired for. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify his mother. Address, 22 Pile- 
stradet, Kristiania, Norway. — 12-22-15 

George Alexander Sharman, a na- 
tive of Brooklyn, N. Y. About 28 
years of age, height 5 feet 9 inches, 



supposed to have sailed on the Great 
Lakes in 1907, is inquired for by 
M. L. Kinvan, 1211 Mosher street, 
Baltimore, Md. 7-14-15 

Olai Ingebrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Niels Ingebrigtsen, 
469— 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 8-4-15 



Acne, T. Mlchaelsen, Andrew 

Andersen, John Maurice, Francois 

Andersson, Oskar Muller, Henry 

Bergman, Leo McNeal, John 

Button, Roswell Makela, N. 

Besly, C. Malm, Gustaf 

Brlen. Hans Nllsen. Nils E. 

Bro, Emll Nllsen, Oskar 

Bentsen, Hans B. Nllsen. Oskar J. 

Bushman. John Olsen, J. P. 

Cooley, H. Orllng, Gust 

Chrlstophersen, C. Owen, Fred 

Carlson, Harry Pedersen, Alf 

Carlson, Gustaf Pelz, Fritz 

Dovle, William Petrow, A. 

Dahlstrom, G. Peterson. H. -1064 

Edlund, Konrad Plntz, Johan 

Franke. Chaa. Peterson. Hugo 

Fjellman, Jonas Petterson. C. V. 

Fusel utsen, Thor Pakkl, Emll 

Fjellman, Karl Pederson, Ole 

Guseck. Bemhard Rlckman, Herman 

Ginar. Walter Ryden. Oskar 

Grlgolelt. E. Roe. Victor 

Oalleburg, Martin Robertson. A. 

Hedman, John M. Rush, Charlie 

Tlorlln. Ernest Rles, J. H. 

Henrlcksen. H. C. Raun, Elnar 

Hedlund, Olaf Rudd, Walter 

Heesche, Henry Skaanes, Egil 

Holmstrom. Fritz SJoblom, G. A. 

Haupt. Fritz Sprogue, Th. 

Hansen. Charley Stenberg, Alfred 

Hansen. Ole Svennlngsen, S. N. 

Hoversen. Carl Simpson, L. C. 

Jaoobsen. Lars Samuelsson. Frank 

.lohanson, John Smith. Johan 

Johnson, Jack Soderlund. Anton 

Janson, Oscar Schmidt, Lourltz P. 
Johnsson. J. A. -16B9Strom. C. L. 

.Tohanson, Victor Sandblom, Konrad 

Kluff N. Thorsen. Carl 

Kallas M. Tennlsen, Andrew 

Kolodzie, George Ullman. Axel 

Karnup, Edward TJhllg. Richard 

Kallio. Anton Ulappa. Kostl 
Lundqulst, Abraham Welsen. Julius (Reg. 
Laatzen. H. Letter) 

T.indeman. Gust Wlschkar, Ernst 

Lorenz, Bruno Wlkman, P. 

Lutzen. Waldemar White, Robert 

Larson, Max Warkkala. John 
Lindberg. Emit Newspapers and 

Leideker. Elith Packages. 

Martin, John B. Schmidt. Laurltz P. 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Anderson. John E. 
Burk, Harry -1284 
Crantly, C. W. 
Eugenic John 
Ekelund, Rlckhard 
Ivertsen, Slgvald B. 
I^nRwenu8, W. L. 
MSller, F. 



Nelsen, C. F. 
Petersen, Carl 
Peters, Walter 
Relther, Fritz 
Rolberg, B. P. 
Strand, Conrad 
Thompson, Emll N. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anders C. Anderson, a native of 
Norway, who left his personal effects 
at Port San Luis, Cal., after leaving 
a ship at that place, is inquired for. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify D. R. Jacks, Deputy 
Collector of Customs, Port San Luis, 
Cal. 12-22-15 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July, 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St. 8-11-15 

Olof Pedersen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 60, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify J. T. 
Miles, 761 Greenwich St., New York, 
N. Y. 2-16-16 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Peter Murphy, better known as 
Boatswain McGann, will kindly notify 
Patrick Kieran, 58 Commercial St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 4-19-16 

Vencelus Durbich is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please communicate with 
Gerolamo Durbich, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 7-28-15 

John Seaberg, No. 2890, a native 
of Russia, age 30, and a member of 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, is 
inquired for by his wife. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. H. Seaberg, Gen. Del., Sac- 
ramento, Cal. 8-30-16 

Will John Baumeister, member of 
the Sailors' Union, will call at the 
office and receive a letter waiting for 
him there. 

Edward Beahan, a native of Cali- 
fornia, supposed to be sailing on the 
Lakes, is inquired for by his brother, 
J. J. Beahan, 2003 Chestnut street, 
Oakland, Cal. 5-10-16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The Skinner & Eddy Corporation of Seattle 
announced that the 8800-ton steel freighter for 

B. Stolt-Neilson of Norway will be launched at 
1:30 p. m. October 21. 

William J. Jones, Portland stevedore, has 
obtained the Bremerton navy yard coal dis- 
charging contract. Bids were opened in Seattle, 
the successful bid for the 30,000-ton contract 
being $7,895. 

The Independent Towing Company of Seattle 
announced it will add two tugs to its fleet and 
the Washington Tug and Barge Company will 
buy four more large scows. Both corporations 
are owned by the same interests. 

The former Union Iron Works wrecking 
steamer "Iaqua" has been converted into a first- 
class freighter and left San Francisco during the 
past week for Mexican ports with a cargo of 
merchandise and combustibles. 

Wilhelm Reimers, marine fireman, was 
awarded a judgment for $500 by Federal Judge 
Dooling in a suit for damages for personal in- 
juries received on a vessel belonging to Henry 
Wilson & Co. Reimers was badly burned at an 
oil burner. 

Richard J. Ringwood, vice-president of and in 
charge of the traffic of the newly-organized 
Pacific Steamship Cmpany, which will take 
over the Pacific Coast Steamship Company and 
the Pacific Alaska Navigation Company on 
November 1, has formally announced the 
personnel of the traffic department of the new 
company. 

The new Pacific Steamship Company will have 
an authorized capital of $1,000,000. Half of it 
has been issued and paid in equal amounts by 
the Pacific Coast Company and the Pacific 
Alaska Navigation Company. These two com- 
panies charter their respective fleets to the new 
company for a term of ten years. The value of 
the two fleets aggregates about $7,000,000. 

The schooner "Academy," which, after her pur- 
chase by a citizen of Peru at a sale conducted 
by the District Court of the Canal Zone, cleared 
for Guayaquil on April 23 but was unable to 
make the port against contrary winds and re- 
turned to Balboa on May 23, was repaired in 
Panama and has been placed in the Peruvian 
coasting trade. She is reported as having ar- 
rived at Callao. 

Andy Mahoney, who is having two motor-ships 
built at the shipyards of James Robertson at 
Benicia, said work on the vessels is progressing 
rapidly. The first of the vessels ordered is in 
frame, and will be ready for launching during 
the month of February. The keel of the second 
vessel is now being laid. The engines for the 
vessels, which will be of the Bolinder type, are 
now on their way from Sweden. 

At a meeting held during the past week in 
San Francisco Oliver J. Olson was elected 
president of the Shipowners' Association for 
the fourth consecutive term. James Tyson was 
elected vice-president and the following named 
directors: C. R. McCormick, Stanley Dollar, 
John C. Rohlfs, W. S. Bennett, W. H. Wood, 

C. A. Thayer and A. B. Johnson. William F. 
Sullivan was unanimously re-elected secretary. 

The fire aboard the steamer "Congress" left 
her in exceptionally bad condition, according to 
Supervising Inspector John K. Bulger. While 
in the north, Bulger went to Coos Bay, where 
the vessel was then lying, and inspected her, 
but, as the local inspectors at Seattle have not 
given out their decision on the cause of the 
blaze, he refused to comment on the matter. 
Bulger also surveyed the bark "Phyllis" and 
inspected a newly-invented life buoy while at 
Portland. 

It is reported that two-thirds, or about 10,000 
tons, of the steel plates entering into the con- 
struction of five Norwegian steamers to be 
built by J. F. Duthie & Co., of Seattle, will be 
fabricated at the plant of the Northwest Steel 
Company at Portland. With the seven steamers 
it had previously signed contracts to build at 
Portland, this will make practically twelve Nor- 
wegian steel vessels for which the Northwest 
Steel Company will fabricate the material. The 
fleet will have an approximate value of $12- 
000,000. 

R. S. Moore of the Moore & Scott Iron 
Works, who is now in New York, has notified 
the San Francisco office that he has closed 
contracts for the building of four new freighters 
at the Oakland creek plant of the company. 
The vessels will be built for Norwegian firms 
and will be ready for delivery in the fall of 
1917 and the spring of 1918. One of the 
vessels will be a duplicate of the "Capto." The 
other three will have a net tonnage of 9400 
tons. The three vessels will be 415 feet long 
and 54 feet deep. 

A contract has been signed between Andy 
Mahony and the Robertson shipyards of Benicia 
for the construction of a shallow draft steam 
schooner for the Coquille River lumber trade. 
The new vessel is to be 200 feet long, 46 feet 
wide and 13 feet 6 inches deep. The lumber- 
carrying capacity of the vessel will be about 
800,000 feet and the cost of her construction will 



be approximately $150,000. Instead of installing 
the customary steam engine to propel the vessel, 
a Diesel engine will supply the motive power for 
Mahony's new schooner. This will be the first 
vessel of her class to have this type of engine 
and her operation will be watched with interest 
by the local steamship men. 

Excellent progress is being made by con- 
tractors in the building of Piers 8, 9 and 10 for 
Honolulu Harbor. The three piers are prac- 
tically consolidated into one, of the bulkhead 
class, and constitute the most extensive wharf 
ever built in the Hawaiian Islands. With the 
completion of this work, Honolulu Harbor will 
have nineteen principal wharves, three-fourths 
of them with a capacity for the largest passenger 
and freight steamers plying the Pacific. Tests 
have been given to the floating dry dock of the 
Inter-Island Steam Navigation Company. Its 
capacity for vessels of the size of the "Wil- 
helmina" is shown to be ample. With the 
completion of new wharves, and the addition 
of vessels of larger type calling at Honolulu, the 
Inter-Island Company has in contemplation the 
construction of two to four more units, giving 
the floating dry dock a much greater capacity. 

From George F. Whittemore, engineer in 
charge at the Humboldt Bay jetties, it is learned 
that Colonel Thomas H. Rees, U. S. Engineer in 
charge of the district, has ordered another sur- 
vey of the bar to be made in November. The 
last survey showed the controlling depth to be 
four feet less than that of the previous survey, 
and it is now desired to ascertain if conditions 
are improving. As explained by Mr. Whittemore, 
the shoal place is at a particular spot, and refer- 
ence to the maps of the original jetty con- 
struction work showed that at practically the 
same place there was a shoal when the original 
jetty structure had been built out to about where 
it is now. Also it showed that as the north 
jetty was extended this shoal disappeared. Ex- 
cept for this shoal, at this time there is shown 
to have been a remarkable lessening of the 
amount of sand on the bar this year. 

Suit to recover $129,892 from the Golden Gate 
Transport Company and James and George 
Flood, its chief stockholders, has been filed in 
the Superior Court at San Francisco by George 
McNear. The action is the result of losses sus- 
tained in handling coal shipments for the United 
States Government. According to the complaint, 
McNear and the Golden Gate Transport Com- 
pany entered into an agreement to handle coal 
shipments and agreed to divide the profits or 
losses in the business. McNear alleges the trans- 
port company was to furnish ships to him as 
charterer and cooperate with him in the conduct 
of the business. Among the ships chartered to 
McNear, the complaint recites, were: "Hans B.," 
"Mathilda," "Terrien," "Inveram," "Ockley," 
"Detmold," Inverkip," "Kenkon Maru" and 
smaller vessels. The coal was transported prin- 
cipally from Norfolk, Va., to the naval station 
at Honolulu during the years of 1913 and 1914. 
The losses sustained in the Government contract 
were approximately twice the amount for which 
McNear sues. The Flood brothers, who own 
998 shares of the 1000 shares of stock in the 
Golden Gate Transport Company, are made co- 
defendants. 

Captain E. R. Sterling, of Seattle, has pur- 
chased the schooner "J. M. Weatherwax" and 
rechristened her the "Ethel M. Sterling." The 
vessel left Sydney, N. S. W., September 1 for 
Puget Sound to load a return cargo for an 
Australian port. The schooner sailed from 
Royal Roads for Sydney June 2, 1915, under 
charter to Niel Nielsen, trade commissioner for 
New South Wales at San Francisco, with a 
cargo of 465,382 feet of lumber, but put in at 
Honolulu June 29 leaking badly and otherwise 
weather damaged. She resumed her voyage from 
Honolulu August 14 that year, only to put back 
to that port October 5, again leaking badly. 
She spent nearly three months there making 
repairs before she put to sea Januarv 10, 1916— 
finally arriving at Sydney April 5, 307 days after 
she passed out at Cape Flattery. Her time 
from Honolulu to Sydney, after making her last 
attempt to complete the voyage, was 85 days. 
Shortly after putting back to Honolulu the 
second time the master and crew libeled the 
vessel for wages and she was ordered to be 
sold at public auction by the United States 
court at Honolulu. On learning of this action, 
Mr. Nielson proceeded from San Francisco to 
Honolulu and bought the vessel on behalf of 
New South Wales, later returning to San Fran- 
cisco and sending out Captain R. H. Purdy to 
navigate the vessel to destination. She was 
built at Aberdeen. Wash., in 1890, 365 tons 
register, with a lumber-carrying capacity of 
about 550,000 feet. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md WALTER LESCH, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY GUSTAV H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

41 Loyalls Lane 

NEWPORT, Va OSWALD RATHLEV, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. MOLLERSTADT, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 

206 Julia Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex WILLY MULLER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Texas JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 
Broad. 
New York Branch, 514 Greenwich St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 228 Lafayette St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 164 Eleventh Ave. 
Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 181 Fulton St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 231 Dock St. 
NEW YORK CITY, 164 Eleventh Ave. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW York CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 202 Atlantio Ave. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 328-332 West Randolph St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 
Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
Branches: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda. N. Y. 

Milv .ukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast 


Seamen' 


s J 


ournal 


Publi 


shed weekly at ! 


San Francisco 




BY THE 






SAILORS UNION OF 


THE 


PACIFIC 




Established ir 


1887 





PAUL, SCIIARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE 

One year by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - J1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
Maritime Building, 59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be pub- 
lished in the JOURNAL, provided they are of general 
st, brief, legible, written on one side only of 
the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1916. 



THE SAME OLD GAME. 



When John Rosseter stepped into the shoes 
of l\. P. Schvverin as Vice-President and 
General Manager of the Pacific Mail Steam- 
ship Company, it was earnestly hoped that 
American seamen would receive a new deal 
at the hands of that malodorous corporation. 
But our hopes have been cruelly blasted — 
all too soon. 

Under the regime of -Mr. Schweriil the 
so-called American steamships operated By 
the Pacific Mail were in reality nothing but 
training schools for Chinese coolies. And 
judging by current newspaper reports Mr. 
Rosseter is fully determined to assume all 
the responsibilities which go with the job. 
lie is prepared even to re-establish those 
training schools at which none but Asiatics 
need apply. Like that other illustrious pa- 
triot, "Captain" Dollar, he seems to be quite 
willing also to malign his own countrymen 
who demand living wages and eulogize the 
Chinese coolies who will live on a rice diet 
and accept a wage of $7 per month. 

The first blast of invectives which Mr. 
Rosseter hurls at American seamen is to be 
found in the San Erancisco Chronicle of 
October 17. It is needless to quote this new 
champion of coolie labor. He is simply re- 
peating the same old libelous phrases which 
the Dollars and the Schwerins have thrown 
at American seamen for lo, these many years. 
The troubles of Mr. Rosseter commenced 
when he shipped a makeshift and grossly 
incompetent crew at San Francisco for the 
steamship "Ecuador." His scab herders 
raked and scraped every corner of the water- 
front for cheap non-union men. This a 
gation, composed of many different nation- 
alities, including 11 Filipinos, 7 Chinamen 
and 2 Japanese, he was pleased to call an all- 
American crew. And when this curious mix- 
ture failed to "perform" in genuine meek 
and docile Chinese fashion Mr. Rosseter had 
himself quoted, as follows : 

Judging from the examples set on board the 
"Ecuador," it is utterly impossible to operate 
our vessels to the Orient with a full American 
crew. It is our earnest wish that such a thins 
were possible, but the conduct aboard the 



"Ecuador" has proved it is not, especially in 
the steward's department. 

In reply to these silly and baseless asser- 
tions the Journal charges that Mr. Ros- 
seter never did employ "a full American 
crew" and that he never had the intention to 
carry such a crew either on the "Ecuador 
or any other of the Pacific Mail liners. 

Mr. Rosseter does not want American 
crews. He does not even want "white 
crews." What he is after is "cheap crews," 
and it matters not a whit to him whether 
they be yellow, brown or black in color. If 
Mr. Rosseter had desired to give a trial to 
a competent American or all-white crew he 
could have had the men upon application at 
the respective union headquarters. The 
Oceanic Steamship Company, the Matson 
Navigation Company, and other concerns 
having regular offshore sailing dates at San 
Francisco, have for years employed union 
crews to the entire satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. 

Hut perish such a thought! The thing 
Mr. Rosseter set out to do was to discredit 
American crews and, if possible, to cast 
odium upon the Seamen's Act. This has 
been the established policy of the Pacific 
.Mail Company ever since American seamen 
have organized for self-protection. Fortu- 
nately, it is utterly impossible to fool all the 
people all the time. Mr. Schwerin tried it 
and failed ignominiously. And Mr. Ros- 
seter will not succeed even though every plu- 
tocratic newspaper from Maine to California 
should endorse and echo all his un-American 
sentiments about the worthlessness of Amer- 
ican crews. 



The Journal is pleased to note that the 
Seattle longshoremen and their employers 
finally arrived at a point where they go1 
together and decided to work out their dif- 
ferences among themselves. According to 
J. A. Madsen, Secretary of the Pacific 
Coast District of the International Long- 
shoremen's Association, "the strike has 
been called off for the purpose of permit- 
ting the employers to carry out the terms 
of a settlement mutually agreed upon." 
Just what the nature of the settlement is 
remains a secret. Mr. Madsen stating that 
lie and his associates are pledged net to 
divulge same. It is to be- hoped, however, 
that the terms of this long-deferred set- 
tlement are at least equally as good as 
those offered by the employers mi June 
24, but rejected by \hv Longshoremen's of- 
ficials without even consulting the mem- 
bership. 



( >ur good friends and fellow workers in 
England, who, at the recent trade union 
congress in Birmingham declared that they 
would "never, never again" talk to those 
horrid German Socialists, or at least not 
until every German soldier had been driven 
from Belgium, seem to be totally unable 
to note their own country's shortcomings 
in this respect. However, since the Allies 
have appropriated the Greek navy without 
the formality of declaring war the widely 
advertised "unjustifiable" invasion of Rel- 
gium is beginning to look like a mere piker's 
performance. 



Mr. Hughes is denouncing the Adamson 
law, whereby the railroad strike was avert- 
ed. Mr. Hushes seems to forget that if the 
Adamson law had not been enacted he 
couldn't have filled his speaking appoint- 
ments. 



PROGRESS OF THE I. S. U. OF A. 



The approach of the New York Con- 
vention of the International Seamen's 
Union of America calls to mind certain 
pleasant facts. 

Surveying the American Seamens's In- 
ternational Union from any angle one is 
compelled to record progress. 

By steady and undiminished growth in 
membership the International Union has 
during the past year easily outdistanced 
all previous performances, the present total 
being far in excess of 30,000. 

From a financial aspect the I. S. U. of 
\. was never in a stronger position, the 
treasuries of all district unions showing 
continued and substantial increases, mak- 
ing the combined total close to half a mil- 
lion dollars. 

Finally, from the point of view of actual 
results obtained for the membership, the 
attainments have outdistanced the most 
O] itimistic predictions. 

The Atlantic Coast District Unions can 
now boast of a larger membership than 
the Pacific Coast organizations. 

The Great Lakes Unions arc rapidh 
recovering from the fierce assaults made 
upon them under the vicious disguise of 
a so-called "Welfare Plan." 

The advances made within the past 
twelve months on the Pacific Coast arc 
generally known and require no further 
comment. 

Altogether, the International Seamen's 
Union of America is coming into its own. 
It would be unfair to attribute all the 
success to one single factor. The Sea- 
men's Act, of course, was the most pow- 
erful lever. But it would be folly to 
deny that the world war and the re- 
sultant high freight rates had their own 
direct bearing on the splendid progress 
made by seamen's unions in all neutral 
maritime nations, and in several of the 
belligerent countries, including Japan. 

The New York Convention will be the 
twentieth annual conclave of the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union. It will doubtless 
be the largest gathering of its kind ever 
held on this continent and it will prob- 
abl\ be the most important as well. In 
addition to the representation from the 
Atlantic. Pacific and the Great Lakes, 
there will be delegates from the National 
Sailors' and Firemen's Union of Great 
Britain and Ireland, and it is likely that 
the recently organized seamen of Japan 
will be heard from through their repre- 
sentative now in America. 

The main features of the work before 
the convention will be dealt with in a 
series of articles in future issues of the 
Journal. To use some war language, it 
should suffice to say at this time that the 
positions gained durign the year "must be 
consolidated." The war will end, some 
day. Freights will take a tumble down- 
ward, sooner or later. Rut that does not 
necessarily mean a lowering of wages or 
a general collapse of the improved con- 
ditions just established. 

Peace or war. the organized seamen of 
America — yes, and the organized seamen 
of all the world — can easily "hold on" to 
all they have gained and make still further 
Sains if we but wisely use the greit power 
inherent in our calling. 

There can be no wise use of power tin- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



less the humblest member in the ranks 
has a full conception of his rights, his 
duties and his responsibilities. It is es- 
sential to have tried and trusted "lead- 
ers" but it is equally important to have 
a loyal membership. And there can be 
no genuine loyalty without a true con- 
ception of the principles and purposes of 
our international movement. 

The I. S. U. of A. was organized in 
Chicago, 111., nearly twenty-five years ago 
because the pioneers in our great move- 
ment recognized "that 'organization' is the 
only means by which the seamen may 
hope for the amelioration and final eman- 
cipation from the many evils attending 
their calling." To carry that gospel in 
the full length and breadth of its mean- 
ing to every man who earns his liveli- 
hood upon the sea is the first great and 
worthy object of the I. S. U. of A. If 
you as an individual have done your level 
best to further this work you may justly 
call yourself a loyal member. If you have 
not, remember, it is never too late to start. 



The now famous case of Takao Ozawa, 
a Japanese whose petition for naturalization 
as an American citizen was denied in a 
recent decision by Federal Judge Charles 
F. Clemons at Honolulu, is to be taken 
before a higher court. Exceptions by 
Ozawa to the decision have been allowed 
by Judge Clemons, and have received the 
approval of United States Attorney S. C. 
Huber, and it is the intention of the Jap- 
anese to place his case before the court of 
appeals of the ninth circuit in California. 
At the time he handed down the decision, 
Judge Clemons expressed the desire that 
the case finally would come before the 
supreme court of the United States, that 
there might be a final ruling as to the 
eligibility of an alien Japanese to become 
a citizen of America. In case Judge 
Clemons' decision is upheld, it is predicted 
that Ozawa may take his appeal to the 
highest tribunal. Ozawa was a rseident of 
the United States for 23 years before filing 
his petition. 



AS OTHERS SEE US. 



Certain pluto-political orators would have 
us believe that American ships have been 
driven off the seas by the party now in con- 
trol of the Federal Government. The rec- 
ords, which are available to all, tell the fol- 
lowing significant truthful and unvarnished 
tale: Seven foreign-built vessels, aggregating 
11,377 gross tons, have been admitted to 
American registry since June 30, 1916; 191 
foreign-built vessels, aggregating 633,448 
gross tons, represent the total number of ves- 
sels admitted to date, unedr the terms of the 
emergency legislation known as the "Act of 
August 18, 1914." 



Having attacked the Seamen's Act, Candi- 
date Hughes feels that he has evened things 
with the Wisconsin Senator who supported 
the Administration Eight-Hour law and the 
Underwood tariff. Doubtless, La Follette 
realized that he would be punished ( ?) some- 
how for attacking the Hughes platform and 
Old Guard control. Incidentally, it is made 
evident that Hughes has kissed good-by both 
the labor vote of the country and the elec- 
toral ballot of formerly Republican Wisconsin. 



In the coming age of complete industrial 
organization international boundary lines 
will cease to be even imaginary. 



An Australian Publicist Thinks Monroe Doc- 
trine Is Merely a Cloak For Our 
Imperialistic Ambitions. 



It is always helpful for nations as well as 

individuals to occasionally see themselves as 
others do. 

A rather severe but quite interesting criticism 
of this country appeared in a recent issue of 

the Queensland "Worker" as a contribution 

from Norman R. Freeberg. The article follows 
in full: 

Trouble has eventuated between Mexico and 
the United States. At least one Power has 
avowed its intention of testing the Monroe 
Doctrine. 

In view of these facts, and with the additional 
knowledge that members in American official 
and academic circles consider that the policy 
has outlived its usefulness, it would appear that 
the principles promulgated by President James 
Monroe ninety-three years ago are to either 
emerge from their shadowy strength or be dis- 
sipated altogether. 

The Monroe Doctrine is one of the two 
acts in American history which stand out vivid- 
ly. The most prominent is, of course, the 
Declaraton of Independence by the thirteen 
colonies in 1776. 

These principles, conveniently known as the 
Monroe Doctrine, are not so essentially Amer- 
ican as is generally considered. While at least 
half a dozen Americans contemporary with 
Monroe shared in the authorship, the original 
suggestion was not American at all, emanating 
from Canning, British Foreign Minister at the 
time. Canning communicated to Rush, American 
Minister at the British Court, the suggestion that 
Great Britain and the United States should 
enter jointly into a declaration against the 
threatened intervention by European powers in 
Spanish America. The British declaration, in 
point of fact, antedated the American by nine 
weeks. The American proclamation, fated to 
become famous in the years following, was in- 
corporated in President Monroe's message to 
Congress on December 2, 1823. 

The exact words of this famous declaration 
are: "In the discussions to which this interest 
has given rise, and in the arrangements by 
which they may terminate, the occasion has been 
deemed proper for asserting as a principle in 
which rights and interests of the United States 
are involved, that the American continents, by 
the free and independent condition which they 
have assumed and maintained, are henceforth 
not to be considered as subjects for future 
colonization by any European power. . . . We 
owe it, therefore, to candor and to the amicable 
relations existing between the United States and 
those powers to declare that we should consider 
any attempt on their part to extend their 
system to any portion of this hemisphere as 
dangerous to our peace and safety. With the 
existing colonies or dependencies of any Euro- 
pean nation we have not interfered and shall 
not interfere. But with the governments who 
have declared their independence and maintained 
it, and whose independence we- have, on great 
consideration and on just principles, acknowl- 
edged, we could not view any interposition for 
the purpose of oppressing them or controlling 
in any other manner their destinies by any 
European power in any other light than as the 
manifestation of an unfriendly disposition to- 
ward the United States." 

From the birth of the United States as a 
nation, its course has been steered in ac- 
cordance with two principles. The first, de- 
clared by Jefferson as early as 1808, was that of 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 13, 1916. 

Regular weekly meeting of the Alaska Fish- 
ermen's Union came to order 8 p. m., John 
Vance Thompson presiding. Secretary reported 
on many matters, and paid special attention 
to the shortage of rations supplied by various 
companies. Delegates to the California State 
Federation of Labor convention submitted their 
report, which was also printed in the last issue 
of the Journal. A committee of three were 
elected, together with the Secretary, to confer 
with the Alaska Packers. A quarterly finance 
committee was elected. 

It was decided to take a definite stand on 
the matter of provisions and supplies, the meet- 
ing being decidedly opposed to the way vari- 
ous companies allow Italian bosses to supply 
provisions, and whereby at the cost of starva- 
tion to the men they are allowed to grow 
rich. Definite action on this question will be 
taken by next meeting which will meet in the 
Sailors' hall, the Fishermen's hall having been 
found too small. All members in port are re- 
quested to attend next meeting, as matters of 
vital importance will then come up. 

I. N. HYLEN, Secretary. 

Maritime Bldg., 49 Clay St. Phone Sutter 
6452. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 16, 1916. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping medium, a large number of 
men around the hall. Comrade Furuseth de- 
parted for the East during the week. One hun- 
dred dollars was donated to the striking San 
Francisco longshoremen. The following were 
elected delegates, by acclamation, to the twen- 
tieth annual convention of the International 
Seamen's Union of America: Andrew Furuseth, 
D. W. Paul and John H. Tennison. The pro- 
posed two platoon system for the San Fran- 
cisco Fire Department was endorsed by unani- 
mous vote. 

The following resolution was adopted at the 
regular meeting held on Oct. 9, and ordered 
printed in the Journal for the information of 
the membership: 

Whereas, Managers of lately organized steve- 
doring companies are insisting upon sending 
men without experience on board vessels to 
work lumber together with our members; and 

Whereas, The handling of lumber, the way it 
is now handled, is very dangerous work, re- 
quiring experienced men to be reasonably safe; 
and 

Whereas, The sending of inexperienced men 
on board the vessel to work lumber together 
with us is sure to cause difficulties, which can 
and should be avoided in order to prevent 
loss of employment for the men and delays 
to the vessels; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we reiterate our position that 
we will accept lumber and other cargo from 
anybody and give it to anybody; further 

Resolved, That on board of the vessels we will 
work with anybody with whom we were work- 
ing prior to June first, 1916; and further 

Resolved, That we call upon the owners of 
vessels to permit the master to engage such 
men to work on board the vessels or that they 
be hired in such way that inexperienced and 
therefore dangerous men be not sent on board 
vessels to work with us as long as experienced 
men can be obtained. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 9, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 

REGINALD TOWNSEND, Agent. 
Room 11, De Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 

St. 

Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 9, 1916. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 9, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects un- 
certain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 9, 1916. 
Shipping good in offshore vessels. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 9, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

H. CHRISTENSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 9, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 9, 1916. 
No meeting. Shipping dull. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 9, 1916. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 2, 1916. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 13, 1916. 

The regular weekly meeting was called to or- 
der at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Sec- 
retary reported shipping fair for waiters, 
for cooks. Donated one hundred and fifty dol- 
lars to the striking longshoremen in San Pe< 
at-.! San Diego and on< hundred dollars to the 
culinary workers in San Francisco. 

EUGENE STETDLE. Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



TAVENNER AT THE BAT. 



A communication recently sent by Con- 
gressman Tavcnner to certain professional 
"knockers" of the Seamen's Act is so full 
of interesting data, and so concise in com- 
position that the JOURNAL deems it a great 
privilege to be able to submit same for 
perusal to its discerning readers. 

The letter follows, in full : 

House of Representatives, 
Washington, 1). C, January 4, 1916. 
Mr. O. F. Hildebrandt, 

Secretary, The Greater Moline Com- 
mittee, Moline, 111. 

My Dear Mr. Hildebrandt: I am in re- 
ceipt of your letter of December 27, ad- 
vising me of the action of the < '.rcater 
.Moline Committee, asking that 1 assist in 
bringing about amendments to the presenl 
Seamen's law, so as to render it more 
favorable toward encouraging American 
capital to invest in the construction or 
purchase of ships, to be operated under 
the American flag. 

In reply I have to say that under separ- 
ate cover I am sending you a copy of the 
Seamen's law, with the request that you 
point out in that law what provisions, if 
any, are working to the discouragement of 
the investment of capital in the construc- 
tion or purchase of ships, and wherein the 
law needs amendment to bring about the 
results asked for in your letter and in 
the action of the Greater Moline Com- 
mittee. 

In this connection I want to submit these 
facts for your consideration : First, that 
the Seamen's law was passed by the United 
States Senate October 23. 1913; that it 
passed the House of Representatives sub- 
stantially in its present form upon Augusl 
27, 1914; that it became a law upon March 
4, 1915; that long prior to the opening of 
the present war, August, 1914, every ship- 
owner, every ship builder, every man who 
kept in touch with the situation through- 
out this whole country knew that legisla- 
tion of the character embodied in the Sea- 
men's Act would be enacted into law. 
Notwithstanding this fact, since August, 
1914, there have been purchased from 
foreign owners and are now under the 
American flag ships which were formerly 
under the flags of other nations to the 
number of 170 of a capacity of over 570,000 
tons. The addition of this tonnage since 
August, 1914. is the greatest acquisition 
that has ever been made to the tonnage of 
the American merchant marine in any year. 
Second, that at the present time there are 
building in the American shipyards for the 
merchant marine of the United States new 
vessels which will add 761,000 tonnag 
the vessel capacity of this country; that 
this activity in ship building at this time 
represents the greatest activity that has 
ever existed in shipbuilding at any one- 
time from the foundation of this Govern- 
ment. 

These two outstanding facts seem to me 
to demonstrate that there is nothing in the 
provisions of the Seamen's law to dis- 
courage the purchase or the construction of 
ships for the merchant marine of the Uni- 
ted States. 

Within my experience with legislative 
matters here in Washington, T have never 
known of a piece of legislation which has 
been so misrepresented as the Seamen's 



law. Prior to its enactment, and since it 
became a law, big shipowners of this coun- 
trv have misrepresented its provisions and 
their effects to business men and to busi- 
ness organizations. They have, through 
the public press, conducted a propaganda 
against this law and have misled those 
who have failed to study the provisions of 
the law, into believing that the act was 
designed and is a blow at American 
shipping. At the same time that they have 
been making this campaign of misrepre- 
sentation and have been tricking organiza- 
tions jed of men with good inten- 
tions but with little or no information with 
!Ct to the act, to take action in opposi 
tion to it. they have been chasing over the 
world buying ships wherever they could 
and bringing them under the American flag. 
They have flooded the shipyards of our 
own country with orders and crowded 
them to work day and night to build new 
ships, at the same time that they have been 
representing to organizations such as yours 
that the law meant financial disaster and 
ruin to them. 

The fact of the matter is that the Sea- 
men's Act does two things. It provides 
greater safety for passengers on boats at 
sea than was formerly provided under the 
law and the regulations. I regret to 
that the safety provisions of this law are 
not as adequate as they should be. I re- 
gret that this law does not provide lifeboat 
for every passenger on board. I re- 
gret that it does not provide an adequate 
number of efficient seamen to man every 
lifeboat. Such protection was contained in 
the original act as it passed the Senate, but 
unfortunately under the pressure of the 
shipowners was removed by the committee 
in the House, and the amended bill had to 
be accepted or no legislation could be se- 
cured. Does it not appear reasonable to 
you and to your committee that the men 
who undertake the transportation of passen- 
gers at sea should provide adecptate and 
efficient safeguards against the dangers of 
the sea? Second, there is the provision of 
the Seamen's Act which has to do with the 
conditions of employment of seamen. You 
may not know, but until the enactment of 
this law the seamen employed on American 
ships and upon the ships of all countries 
coming into the ports of the United States 
were subjected to the provisions of a law 
almost identical with the fugitive-slave 
law; that these men were virtual slaves of 
sea masters; that they could not leave their 
employment at will; that if they would 
leave their employment the process of the 
United States courts was used to arrest, 
detain, and put them back on board ship 
and compel them to submit to involuntary 
servitude. 

There may be, but 1 do not know him, 
an employer in the city of Moline who 
desires a mastery such as this over his 
employes; but if there be such, I unhesi- 
tatingly say that such a man is without 
understanding of the fundamental reasons 
for the Government which we have and 
which we honor. His opinion is not en- 
titled to consideration, and 1 assure vou 
that any man who advocates the repeal of 
the' provisions of the Seamen's Act which 
abrogates slave conditions in the American 
merchant marine and in the ports of the 
United States will yet no consideration 
by me of any such views upon this subject. 



I am for men ; I am for freedom. The 
provision of the Seamen's Act abrogating 
slaves was enacted for men. It was en- 
acted for freedom. 

I have submitted to you facts with re- 
spect to the shipbuilding and ship pur- 
chasing of this country, which demon- 
strates that the Seamen's Act has not in- 
terfered with the shipbuilding and ship- 
owning interests of this country. I want to 
submit one more fact, and that is that the 
Seamen's Act has not increased unduly or 
unreasonably the cost of operation of 
American ships. Recently there has been 
a great amount of talk in the newspapers 
with respect to the conditions upon the 
Pacific ( )cean. < >ne of the men doing this 
talking is Robert Dollar, who operates a 
few small ships. A computation was made 
as to the increased cost of operation of one 
of the Dollar ships, and it shows that the 
increase in the cost of the operation of 
that ship under the provisions of the Sea- 
men's law would be about $o,000 per year, 
while the earning capacity of the ship is 
upward of $200,000 per year, which is an 
excess of its valuation. I will not stand, 
and I do not believe that the Greater 
Moline Committee will stand, for the patri- 
otism (?) of the Robert Dollars, wdio, with 
an earning capacity of upward of 100 per 
cent, on the value of their property, lie- 
cause of a trivial increase in the cost of 
operation, would have the American Con- 
gress restore slave conditions to American 
ships as a condition precedent to the 
maintenance of the American flag upon 
the sea. If that is the condition under 
which the American flag must be main- 
tained upon the sea, better that it never 
floats from the masthead of a ship than 
that it cover and protect slavery. 
Very truly yours, 

Clyde 1 1. Tavenner. 



POOR CHARLIE SCHWAB. 



Kings and capitalists have always com- 
plained of the burden of power and wealth 
and sung the praises of the simple life. 
In the current American Magazine Charles 
Schwab intones the old dirge with these 
words ; 

"When a reasonable man is getting $10,- 
000 or SI 2,000 a year he is getting the most 
he can possibly want to satisfy his needs. 
When he gets more he begins to invite 
unhappiness, and the more he gets the 
more unhappiness he invites. One soon 
loses the enjoyment of spending money. 
One soon wearies of riding about for 
pleasure in private yachts and private cars." 

Bethlehem Steel is around 600 and still 
going up. The prospective unhappiness 
must be terrifying to Schwab. 

Why docs he not selfishly and cruelly- 
unload some of this woe off upon his un- 
derpaid and overworked employes? Sev- 
eral thousand of them are still below the 
$10,000 mark where unhappiness begins 
and would probably not strike before that 
misery-bringing point was reached. — The 
Milwaukee Leader. 



If all lawbreakers were behind bars there 
would be fewer administrators of law and 
also less need for those. 



The legitimate power of government ex- 
tends to such acts only as are injurious to 
others. -Thomas Jefferson. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WALL STREET'S AMERICANISM. 



Replying to a request from representa- 
tives of the labor press for a statement of 
his views on the issues of the campaign, 
Amos Pinchot, formerly one of the closest 
friends and enthusiastic supporters of 
Colonel Roosevelt, has just given out the 
following statement: 

"Wall Street and Fifth Avenue have 
marked Woodrow Wilson for slaughter. 
Whether he gets slaughtered or not is for- 
tunately a question for the public to decide. 

"In New York, my State, the Republi- 
can organization is owned, as it generally 
has been, by highly respectable representa- 
tives of Wall Street and Fifth Avenue. 
They hold the check books, and the ma- 
chine does the rest. To-day, there is no 
such thing in this State as a Republican 
party, in the sense of a group of people 
organized to carry out definite principles — 
that is, unless protecting opportunities to 
make money at the public's expense and 
politically killing off anybody who gets in 
the way is a set of definite principles. 

"In this State alone, the bell-hops of 
privilege, to whom Colonel Roosevelt now 
adds himself as a patriotic recruit (I ask 
his pardon for the hyphenated word bell- 
hop), will probably spend about $2,000,000 
to beat Wilson. If they succeed, they will 
call it cheap at the price. 

"I am not a Democrat, nor a personal 
friend of the President ; but I am going to 
work and vote for him, because, as I look 
at it, he has been the attorney for the 
average American citizen in the struggle 
that everlastingly goes on between him 
and the privileged class, between the per- 
son who earns a dollar and the one who 
gets it. 

"Wall Street is not only stoning Wilson 
with money, it is shrewdly using an ap- 
peal to patriotism to get votes for its own 
candidate. It charges that the President 
acted unpatriotically in preventing the 
United States from establishing American 
rule in Mexico. From Wall Street's point 
of view, this is probably a perfectly sound 
argument, for Wall Street has about $300,- 
000,000 more money invested in Mexico 
than the Mexicans have. From this it fol- 
lows that we should intervene or grab 
Mexico. There is no use arguing this 
proposition with Wall Street American 
investments would be safer if the President 
would send the army down there to look 
after them. 

"The President, however, does not see it 
in that light. He takes the ground that 
the chances are that the Mexicans will 
work out their own salvation better than 
Wall Street will do it for them. He has 
given that struggling neighbor of ours a 
chance to escape the absentee landlordism 
of foreign wealth that has brought its 
people to revolution and starvation. As a 
Western Congressman wrote me, all the 
Mexicans need from the United States is a 
little time and a little humanity. If Amer- 
icans are to shoot Mexicans at all it ought 
to be in the stomach with corn and beans. 

"As to Germany, there were just two 
ways for the United States to settle the 
submarine question. One was war, the 
other was diplomatic negotiations. Wilson 
chose the latter. By those despised "notes" 
he avoided war, won a great diplomatic 
victory and gave the United States a right 



to hold up her head and say that she was 
still a civilized nation. 

"Yes, but in all this, says Wall Street, 
he has been un-American. It was un- 
American of him to bait the trusts, es- 
pecially the Steel Corporation ; un-Ameri- 
can to stand for the Clayton bill, un-Ameri- 
can to protect the rights of labor, and 
particularly un-American to put the peo- 
ple's greatest lawyer on the Supreme Court 
bench. 

"There is something perfectly delightful 
about Wall Street suddenly appearing as 
the protector of Americanism. It ought to 
be set to a tune and sung in music halls. 
Having a good deal of confidence in the 
sense of humor of the public, I don't think 
it is necessary to point out the high lights 
of the situation. I expect that on election 
day a majority of the farmers, wage- 
earners, small business men and other 
ordinary citizens, whom Wall Street sud- 
denly discovers as considerable in years 
divisible by four, will go to the polls w^ith 
a broad grin." 



THE LESSON OF ROSICLARE. 



At the town of Rosiclare in Hardin 
County, Illinois, a strike has been in prog- 
ress since June 2, among the workers in 
the spar mines. Recently an investiga- 
tion of conditions in the territory was 
made by the Committee on Industrial Re- 
lations. And still more recently a com- 
mittee of the National Women's Trade 
Union League investigated. The town is 
located 20 miles from a railroad, is a 
prohibition community and the striking 
miners are not foreigners, but American- 
born. Yet the investigators found that 
they are desperately poor, live in the 
poorest kind of houses provided by the 
mining company and that "the clothes of 
their children are merely rags." The com- 
pany did not allow organization, and an 
effort to form a union led to discharge of 
the leaders and precipitated the strike. 

Since then the usual events have taken 
place that occur in mining communities 
during strikes. The company has imported 
guards who have virtually set aside the 
local government, established an illegal 
form of martial law and by means of a 
reign of terror are trying to break the 
strike. 

That is a deplorable situation, but it is 
the logical result of a system that allows 
a private corporation to monopolize a 
bounty of nature. The same cause has 
produced the same effects in southern Col- 
orado, in northern Michigan, in West Vir- 
ginia, in the Mesaba range of Minnesota 
and other places. There will continue to 
be such occurrences until the cause will be 
removed. It can not be removed by pass- 
age of eight-hour laws or other palliative 
legislation, though these may afford some 
temporary relief. As long as the cor- 
poration or a few individuals control the 
land on which the miners must work, 
they hold the means whereby the workers 
may finally be forced to submit to oppres- 
sive terms. The abolition of land mon- 
opoly is the only way to put on end to so 
intolerable a situation. 

When the workers realize that, they will 
be in position to take effective measures 
for industrial emancipation. Put not until 
then. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 65 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 406 N. Clark Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY. MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 365. 

BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wi«. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELEF STATIONS: 

Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Wis. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Ludington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

^'anistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



1 'ackers' Association and the following 
firms arc now involved because their em- 
ployees declined to act as strikebreakers: 
St. Louis Dressed Beef Company, St. 
Louis Independent Packing Company, 
Krev Packing Company, Belz Provision 
Company, Sartorius Provision Company, 
TIeil Packing Company and the Cox el- 
Cordon Company. 



Huge Profits in Ships. 

The market pages of metropolitan news- 
papers tell a different story from that sung 
by shipowners, who assure the public that 
the seamen's law has wrecked the shipping 
industry. 

In local papers the International Steel 
and Ship Building Company, a new or- 
ganization, in placing its stock on the mar- 
ket, sa\ - 

"Large ship building orders at enormous 
profits are going begging, and the demand 
for ships is getting greater every day. 
Experts who have studied the situation 
agree that the ship building business will 
be extremely profitable for at least 15 years 
or. longer. 

"The general condition of the present 
ship building industry is aptly illustrated 
by a recent American deal in which a ship 
under construction contract for $700,000 
was sold at $1,800,000 above the construc- 
tion cost before it was launched. 

"In other words, a ship costing $700,000 
was sold for $2,500,000." 



A. F. of L. Power Defined. 

The Journeymen Tailors' Union is con- 
ducting a referendum election for officers, 
and the Tailor, its official paper, says: 

"From reading the comunications pub- 
lished in the Tailor touching the election 
of delegates to the convention of the 
American Federation of Labor, we are led 
to the conclusion that a misunderstanding 
exists in the minds of the writers as to the 
scope and power of the convention of the 
A. 1*. of 1.. 

"In the first place the writers overlook 
the fact that the American Federation is a 
voluntary organization, drawn together by 
he realization of the necessity of closer 
mity of the working class, which would 
mable them to be of mutual assistance to 
>ach other. 

"This coming together of the different 
Troups composing the American Federa- 
.ion of Labor does not cause any one 
?roup to lose its autonomy or its identi- 
fication. To do so would be at variance 
with the original intentions of the people 
who of their own free will come together 
with others to secure their friendship and 
assistance in the hour of need. 

"No organization would think of going 
into the A. F. of L. knowing that by so 
doing they would be giving up the right 
to manage their own business as they saw- 
fit. It is safe to predict no union will 
-.ver do so. 

"There is quite an analogy between the 
plan of organization of the United States 
and the American Federation of Labor. 

"The national unions hold the relation- 
ship to the A. F. of L. that the States 
hold to the national government. The 
locals composing the national hold the 
same relationship to it that the different 



counties hold to the State. The United 
States cannot make a law contrary to the 
agreement made at the time the States 
formed a federation. Neither can the 
American Federation make a law that 
would abridge the rights of any national." 



Its Crown of Thorns. 

The following pertinent and pointed edi- 
torial appeared in a recent issue of the 
New York World : 

"The net earnings of the principal rail- 
roads of the country increased only 26.6 
per cent, during the last fiscal year. The 
total net revenue of these roads was only 
SI. 176,804 .000, an increase over last year 
of only $305,969,000. 

"These are the railroads that are about 
to be ruined by an eight-hour day which 
will add to their operating expenses $60,- 
000,000 a year, according to the railroad 
presidents, and $20,000,000 a year accord- 
ing to the brotherhood chiefs. 

"Taking the railroad figures as a basis, 
an eight hour day would decrease the net 
revenue to a paltry $1,116,804,000, which 
in turn would be barely $2V?.<)69,000 in 
excess of the total net revenue of last year. 

"It ought to be plain enough to any- 
body that the railroads are sure to be 
ruined by an eight-hour day. No wonder 
they appealed to the unfortunate shippers 
to intervene and prevent the Government 
from pressing this crown of thorns upon 
the brow of Wall Street. Such a picture 
of railroad poverty and destitution as the 
reports of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission present ought to furnish a new- 
inspiration to the Hughes eloquence." 

The revenue for July averaged $1,330 
for each mile of road, as against $1,139 in 
July, 1915, while expenses averaged $860, 
against $758 last year. The net revenue 
each mile was $470, compared with $381. 



AS OTHERS SEE US. 
(Continued from page 7.) 



abstention from interference in Old World 
politics. The second demanded a quid pro quo, 
inasmuch as America forbade interference with 
the independencies of tin- New World. Let it 
he said to the credit of the United States that, 
throughout her history, she has steadfastly 
maintained that aloofness towards political 
affairs in the Eastern Hemisphere. 

The Monroe Doctrine was considered a neces- 
sary measure of self-protection for the young 
and struggling Republic. The United States 
bad not then the strength which is a character- 
istic at the present time. It did not then pos- 
sess the enormous commercial and financial 
wealth which is heaped within its borders to- 
day. Obviously the young republic feared Eu- 
ropean aggression. It felt the distinct menace 
of the monarchical nations, and the formulation 
and promulgation of a policy to combat or 
prevent those possibilities was inevitable. 

Jefferson was one of the first of a thoughtful 
group to enunciate the plain, but a decade be- 
fore his speeches others had mooted the idea. 

In the year following the announcement. 
Henry Clay proposed that Congress should 
adopt President Monroe's principles in the 
form of a resolution, and thus set them before 
the world as bearing the weight of the American 
nation. Congress considered such action un- 
necessary, and thus it is that the doctrine, 
through the ninety-three years which have 
elapsed, has never been reaffirmed. Yet, while 
it is not. and is never likely to become, inter- 
national law, it has been the central principle 
by which American legislators have guided the 
national destinies and foreign policy through 
almost a century's vicissitudes. 

President James Monroe issued his world- 
famed pronunciamento as a notification to the 
world and the monarchies of Europe that the 
United States sought nothing but peace, where- 
under she could work out her destiny as a re- 
public. 

But the necessity for the doctrine no longer 
exists. America has been left alone. It has 
not worked out its ultimate destiny, but it has 
reached that stage where it no longer is con- 
strained to fear the encroachment of outside 



powers. Nor does there now exist the neces- 
sity for protecting the small independent re- 
publics from oppression and forcible colonization 
by other nations. That essential of 1823 is a 
non-essential in 1916. Such colonization is 
virtually impossible. Alongside of the United 
States have arisen the virile, stable, and pro- 
gressive republii s of Brazil, Argentina, and 
Chile. These nations neither seek nor desire the 
protection and patronage of the United States. 
Nor does unstable Mexico, for that matter. 

The vital side of the Monroe Doctrine, 
whereunder European powers are excluded from 
interfering in the political affairs of American 
countries, has been questioned for many years. 
As far back as 1895 Lord Salisbury denied flatly 
that the doctrine was alive. 

It is obvious to even the dilettante in mat- 
ters pertaining to international relations that 
the Monroe Doctrine lived and endured solely 
because England possessed Canada. The Mon- 
roe Doctrine was — to put it plainly, if some- 
what harshh — blackmail on England. The Im- 
perial Government was informed — in effect if not 
in so many words— that it was incumbent on 
England to keep European meddlers (in- 
cluding herself) away from the Americas. If 
not, well, the fate of Canada would be certain: 
it would be merged quite easily into the United 
States. This threat, rarely spoken and hardly 
ever printed, has been the reason why the 
Monroe Doctrine has had an unbroken life of 
ninety-three years. 

Igain, no doubt it is possible that the smaller 
American nations have less cause to-day to fear 
the aggression of outside powers than they have 
to i ear the aggression of the United States 
itself. The recent and present attitude of 
Washington towards Mexico, the interference 
with Haiti, and the notorious treatment, by 
Roosevelt, of Colombia in the Panama Canal 
deal, disclose the unmistakably imperialistic am- 
bitions cherished by the United States. In fact, 
it has become as arrogant and menacing as any 
of the feared monarchies. 

The actions enumerated are palpable proof 
that the United States government is absolutely 
inconsistent in persisting in the "life" of the 
Monroe Doctrine. It is claimed as a protection 
for the smaller American independencies from 
outside aggression, whereas, in point of fact, it 
acts as a shield behind which the United States 
itself is the aggressor. 

The spirit of 1823 no longer actuates Wash- 
ington. The old love of freedom, the high 
ideal of a clean democratic republic, the in- 
terested, yet withal chivalrous, desire to protect 
the independence of weaker and smaller coun- 
tries, has long since disappeared — disappeared 
beneath the encroachment of the greatest indus- 
trial despotism and the bitterest struggle for 
money — dollar worship — in the world. Capital- 
ism is exemplified in the highest in the United 
States to-day. Coupled with it is a growing 
imperialism. 

The dollared class of America, by the force 
of its financial power, unscrupulously wielded, 
controls the national government and dictates its 
policies. Ideals have been suffocated beneath 
the tide of gold. Exploitation by huge trusts of 
their own country and people is so intense and 
tremendous that it produces an immense surplus 
of goods, which perforce must be sold to the 
people of other countries. Eoreign trade is neces- 
sary, and imperialism, aggression, and even 
colonization and war are becoming necessary to 
the foreign trade of the United States. And 
that is why the smaller republics fear the United 
States above every other country. The re- 
mainder of the two Americas offers a vast and 
wealthy field of foreign trade, and the trusts 
which control the United States government 
do not intend to allow other nations any chance 
of sharing therein. Here it is that the danger 
lies, and it is here that the Monroe Doctrine 
will be weighed in the balance. 

In seeking to maintain an entire monopoly of 
the American markets, which will necessitate 
force of some description, the United States 
"Dollary" (it is a republic now in little more 
than name') will come into conflict with 
other powers seeking a share of the plunder in 
the same fertile fields. Prior to the present 
conflict, it is known that considerable uneasiness 
was created by the activities of Germany. 
Another power is likely to call the American 
bluff in the near future. 

The Monroe Doctrine has long passed its 
function of safeguarding American liberty. It 
is now the instrument of a growing, unclean 
imperialism, engendered and fostered by the 
notorious money-hungry commercialists of the 
United States. Tts principles have degenerated 
until they no longer can be linked up with 
chivalry, but they can be, and are, linked up 
with the interests of a commercial and financial 
class which is a dishonor to humanity and an 
cnfoulment of the wheels of progress. 



You can't teach a "new" trade unionist old 
tricks. He insists upon learning in his own 
way and at the cost of his own bumps. 



Smoke only blue-labeled cigars! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



AREA OF THE CANAL ZONE. 



The area of the Canal Zone within the 
limits of five miles on either side of the 
center line of the Canal, including land and 
water but not including the area within 
the three-mile limit from the Atlantic and 
Pacific ends, is 441.5 square miles. This 
is made up as follows : 

Square 
miles. 
Land area inside of 5-mile limits. . . 332.35 
Gatun Lake area inside 5-mile limits 

at elevation plus 87 feet 106.40 

Miraflores Lake at elevation plus 55 

feet : 1.90 

Area of channel from Atlantic coast 

to Gatun Locks and Pacific coast 

to Miraflores Locks .85 

Total 441.50 

The statement of the Official Handbook 
of 1911 that the area of the Canal Zone 
was 448 square miles was correct at that 
time. By a treaty proclamation of Feb- 
ruary 18, 1915, however, an area of about 
6^ square miles contiguous to the city of 
Panama was ceded to Panama in exchange 
for a small tract in front of the Tivoli Ho- 
tel and a small tract in the city of Colon 
on which a battery is situated. 

By the same treaty The Panama Canal 
acquired absolute control of all the waters 
of Gatun Lake outside the 5-mile limits 
and also of all land contiguous thereto 
up to the 100-foot contour. The area of 
the portions of the lake lying outside the 
5-mile limits is 61 square miles, the total 
area of the lake being 167.4 square miles, 
at elevation plus 87 feet. Adding the 61 
square miles to the 441.5 square miles 
lying within the 5-mile limits makes the 
area of the Canal Zone 502.5 square miles, 
exclusive of such land as lies between the 
edge of the lake at 87 feet and the 100- 
foot contour, and of the areas within the 
3-mile limits at the ends. 



THE "WALKING DELEGATE." 



"When you have no case, abuse the other 
side," is a well known adage, always acted 
upon when human interests clash, as they 
are always doing, and like everything else 
in present society, this policy tends always 
to specialization and concentration. Cer- 
tain persons are usually selected as chief 
recipients of the abuse. 

In conflicts between labor and capital 
what is called "the walking delegate" has 
become the customary figure for the abuse 
from the hostile capitalist camp. He is al- 
most a historic figure ; for generations, in 
fact, ever since trade unions became a fac- 
tor of any importance in the world of pro- 
duction, the walking delegate has been on 
the capitalist grill. 

There was a time when they didn't 
trouble to abuse him. They had no words 
to waste upon him. They rammed him 
into jail, transported him as a convict be- 
yond the seas, and sometimes they hanged 
him. When they could do these things 
110 longer, the policy of abuse started. Tt 
has been kept up ever since. 

In those days the walking delegate 
walked. Hence the adjective describing 
him. He tramped from one job or shop 
to the other, acting as agent for the union 
and carrying out its instructions. But that 



was when trade unionism was small and 
weak and confined to limited localities. 

Now that unionism has become nation- 
wide, the walking delegate no longer walks. 
He rides on the trains from place to place 
like other people. In the enormous cities 
that have arisen as a result of modern pro- 
duction, even the local walking delegate 
can no longer walk and perform the serv- 
ices the union demands from him. He 
must use the same means of transportation 
that other people do. 

And this necessity only brings upon him 
a still greater volume of sneering abuse 
from the capitalist employers. If he would 
only continue his walking, and thus fall 
down on his job, it would suit them much 
better. But, not being the fool they could 
wish, he rides. So they get back at him 
by cartooning him as riding in an auto, 
thus calling attention to his misnomer of 
"walking" delegate. 

Yet this much abused person has no 
power except that given to him by the 
union he represents. He doesn't call 
strikes or inaugurate boycotts, nor put cap- 
italist concerns on the blacklist. He is 
nothing more than the agent of the union 
in everything he does. 

There have been scoundrels among walk- 
ing delegates, to be sure. But in every 
such case the walking delegate has been 
started on his career of scoundrelism by 
the virtuous capitalist employers, corrupt- 
ing, bribing and seducing him from his 
allegiance to the workers. 

Their one regret is that he is not the 
scoundrel they represent him to be, and that 
they have failed to make him. 

When you hear or see the walking dele- 
gate roundly abused, sneeringly cartooned, 
denounced and scolded in the capitalist 
press, that is the very best testimonial to 
the fact that he is doing what the union 
has employed him to do. It is, in its own 
peculiar way, a guarantee of his honesty 
and straightforwardness. 

A walking delegate that is not hated, 
feared, abused and slandered publicly by 
the capitalist press is of no use to the 
union that employs him. The capitalists 
do not want to get rid of him, but the 
workers do; the former can use him, but 
the latter cannot.— New York Call. 



Recently a prominent bishop said that 
low wages was never the cause of a 
woman's fall. She could, if she would, re- 
sist temptation. Admitting this fact, what 
has she or society gained by her meager 
existence and shortened life? Woman's 
first duty is the reproduction of the race. 
Society advances, not as she shows a 
power to resist the tendency for which 
she was created, but as it establishes con- 
ditions that permit her to become a mother. 
The material level necessary for health 
and child-bearing is the nation's responsi- 
bility. — Simon N. Patten. 



I am really mortified to be told that 
in the United States of America a fact like 
this can become a subject of inquiry, and 
of criminal inquiry, too, as an offense 
against religion, that the question about 
the sale of a book can be carried before the 
civil magistrate. Is this, then, our freedom 
of religion? And are we to have a censor 
whose imprimatur shall say what may be 
sold and what we may buy? — Thomas 
Jefferson. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where thy have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C, 1424 Government St. 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 213 Hastings St., E. corner of 
Hastings and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2216 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 

EUREKA, Cal.. 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875 

PORTLAND, Ore., 242 Flanders St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Room No. 203, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 214. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 98 Second St. N. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42- 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 
PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada, 437 Gore Ave. 
PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada, P. O. Box 968. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



BA- AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
KAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 10 East St. 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Horseshoers' Union of Grand 
Rapids, Mich., has demanded that 
hereafter their wages be $3.75 for 
nine hours, half holiday on Satur- 
days during June. July, August, and 
September, and better working con- 
ditions. The demand was rejected 
by the boss horseshoers and the men 
struck. Some of the shops have con- 
ceded the conditions demanded. 

California State public employment 
bureaus have secured positions for 
26,914 men and women since Febru- 
ary 1. when they were opened. 
These workers have earned approxi- 
mately $4,000,000 in wages and have 
saved $54,000 in fees which they 
otherwise would have had to pay to 
private agencies. Every kind of la- 
bor, from boothblack to superin- 
tendent, is included in the list. 

To help the Chicago Teachers' 
Federation in fighting the effort to 
introduce spoils politics into the 
schools, the sum of $3100 was 
pledged at a recent meeting held in 
that city. At this meeting Margaret 
Haley said she had evidence that the 
president of the school board, Jacob 
Loch, had declared his intention to 
get rid of Superintendent John D. 
Shoop for refusing "to do as he or- 
dered in his dealings with the Fed- 
eration." 

The employes of the Crown Cork 
and Seal Company at Baltimore went 
on strike for three days when the 
company refused to concede an ad- 
vance in wages demanded. Several 
conferences followed with the repre- 
sentatives of the company which 
finally resulted in an agreement 
whereby an increase of 51 cents 
was agreed upon. The concession 
proved acceptable to all the people 
involved and work has been re- 
Mimed. 

President Perham of the Order of 
Railway Telegraphers reports that 
revised schedules on 16 large lines 
have been secured during the past 
quarter. President Perham states 
that the membership is to be con- 
gratulated on this record of achieve- 
ment. The latest gains have been 
made by Baltimore & Ohio railroad 
telegraphers who have secured an 8 
per cent, increase. The United 
States Board of Mediation and Con- 
ciliation assisted in the negotiations. 
The Oleum, Cal., plant of the 
Union Oil Company has established 
the eight-hour day and a regular 
monthly salary instead of an hourly 
wage scale. "In inaugurating the 
eight-hour day in our plant we are 
but following the trend of progress," 
said Assistant Superintendent Page. 
"Tt has come to be generally recog- 
nized that a man must have ample 
time for recreation, rest and study 
if he is to do good work. Our com- 
pany recognizes this fact and we 
have inaugurated the eight-hour day 
for our 350 employees." 

A thorough investigation .of Gov- 
ernment ownership and control of 
railroads, telegraph lines, express 
companies, river and ocean trans- 
portation and other public utilities 
will begin November 20, Senator 
Newlands announced in an address 
before the Chicago Chamber of Com- 
merce. The investigation will be by 
the joint sub-committee composed 
of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mittees of the House and Senate, 
of which Newlands is chairman. The 
investigation will be conducted in 
accordance with President Wilson's 
recommendations to Congress. 



Office Phone 
Elliott 1196 



MARSHALL'S 



Residence 
North 3445 



NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

Compasses Adjusted 

301-2 P. I BUILDING, Next to Post Office 

Established 1890 SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 
1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St 
Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wath., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 



Alonso, J. 
Andersen, A. -1821 
Andersen, Oscar 
Anderson, G. (Cas- 

sie) 
Anderson, Frank 
Anderson, E. -1323 
Anderson, Anker A 
Andersen, A. F. 
Andersen, HJalmar 
Anderson, G. -1831 
Albregtsen, Gal. 
Astad, Ole 
Augustin, H. 
Behm, F. 
Benson, D. 
Bergstrom, A. 
Berglund, Ivar 
Berknes, Ole 
Brainley, E. 
Brodie, J. 
Brennan, P. 
Bye, Elnar 
Carlson, Gust 
Carlson, Harry 
Carlson, Erik 
Christensen, -1366 
Cottingham, F. 
Davidsen, John 
Duncan, Geo. 
Eggers, J. O. W. 
Emkow, Otto 
Eriksen, Otto 
Erlckson, Lars 
Eriksen, Kristoffer 
Erdman, Paul 
Erbe, L. J. 

I, O. 
Faster, A. 
Fernquist, C. W. 
Ford, L. 

Fredericksen, B. J 
Fredriksen, I. H. G 
Gerber, Fritz 

Glllet, H. 
Goodman, W. 
Grant, Dave 
Hagen. Thos. 
Haavold. P. 
Haugrud. H. O. 
Halin. J. 
Hotten, C. 
Hoist. Herman 
Jalmke, Otto 
Jensen, Hans 
Jenkins, Fred 
Johansen. Oscar 
Jorgensen, Olaf 
Jonsson. Karl 
Johnson, Karl 
Jorgensen, Fred 
Junge, H. 
Kolh, G. 
Koeh. W. 
Kylander, H. 
Kali. erg. Arvld 
Laamanen. J. 
Larsen, Nels 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larkin, Thos. 
Lackey, C. H. 
Magnusen, I>ars 
Marharls. Henry 
MeJntosh, James 
MeManus, P. 



Martlneen, Aug. 
MIctenen, John 
Morrisay, James 
Mynkmeyer, H. 
Monroe, A. J. G. 

M. 
Moen, H. 

.Mikkelsen, W. -1620 
Moore, Albert 
Ness, T. 
Nelson, Werner 
N.ls. in, Charley 
Nelsen, Adolf 
Nero, Jerome 
Nilsen, Feder 
Nielson, Alfons 
Nlwerth, A. 
Nordstrom, E. 
Nygard, Oluf 
Olsen, James 
Olsen, Harald 
Olsen, Ole -542 
Olsson. I. H. 
Olsen, Chr. M. 
Olsen, Oswald 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsen. N. R. 
Olsen, J. 
Olsen, Frank 

I, B. 
Osterlund. W. 
Ozerhowski, Leo 
Patfrson, P. 
Pedersen, Martinin 
Petterson, R. S. 
Peterson, Oscar 
Pestof, S. 
Pietsan, Jacob 
Pleklstrom, J. 
Pergler, C. 
Pinger, B. T. 
.Pollack, T. 
.Pictzman, L. D. 
Public ates, Aug. 
Peterson, W. 
Powers. James A. 
Petersen, Lawrence 
Iiasmussen, John 
Rasmusen. Arthur 
Rajala, V. 
Reinlnk, H. 
Robberstad. Nil:! 
Rodstal. Anton 
Ruff. Alf. 
raindstrom, A. 
Salisbury, T. 
Sarin. C. 
Sanseter. P. 
Stammerjohan, C. 
Stohr. E. C. 
Sehultz, W. 
Schmidt, J. 
Setbert. G. 
Skarberg, T. 
Smith. T. 
St. Clair. C. 
Sorensen. M. 
Sorensen, Geo. 
Thorsen, Carl 
Ween. Ole 
Wiking. Aug. 

Wicksten, A. 

Williams. T. C. 
Young. A . 
Zekow, Hans 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



B0NNEY-WATS0N CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 



Broadway at Olive St. 



East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 

Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



EureKa, Cal. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick servlca 

233 Second Street, Eureka. Cal. 

Teddy ® Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY &. YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, SarsapariUa and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts.. Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Adolfsson, Gottfrld Melngail, M. 

Bratt. F. H. Nielsen, Niels -751 

Carlson, Gustaf Olsson, Per 

Hodson, H. I. Peel, Peter 

Jaeobson, Gustaf Simonson. Sigvard 

Jensen, Hans -1555 Soter, Erik 

Lundgren, Carl Suomlnen, Oskar 

Magnusson, Ernest Svensen, John 

W. Ullman. Emll 

Marks, Thorwald Vigen, Ellas 
Martinsson, E. 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 
• Trunks and Suitcases ■ 



Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 8393 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Alfred Pettersen Hilland, a native 
of Bergen, Norway, age 44, is in- 
quired for by his brother, Randolph 
Pettersen. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, 100 Steuart St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 7-26-16 

Gumersindo Fernandez, formerly 
messboy on steamer "Watson," 
should call at the offices of Nathan 
H. Frank, 1215 Merchants Exchange 
Bldg., San Francisco, and receive 
salvage money due him from S. S. 
"Camino." 8-30-16 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 

Contreras. Julio Kustel. Victor J. 

Kyrkslatt. Lars Klnowsky, A. 

Lawrence, Harry Ingebrethsen, Alf. 
Melander, G. L. 



Alaska Fishermen 
Baa PranciK*. 



Andersen, S. P. 
Andersen, August 
Arentse, John 
Arvald, Jack 
Carey, Arthur L. 
Erleksen. J. E. A. 
Hak.mson, John 
Hansen, Georg. 
Jaeobsen, Jack 
Jansen, Jacob 
Jansson, Axel. J. 
Johnsen, Harry 
Johnsen, August 
Kenny, Frank 



Kester, Erieh 
Koester, Ernst 
Koning, D. 
Krane. Anton 
Larsen, Martin 
Lillihel, Hans 
Machado. Frank 
Nelson, Chas. R. 
Noland, Edvard 
Pernu, Kallo 
Petersen, Fritz L. 
Sundberg, Conrad 
Wilhelmson, Seth 



Hugo Carlson Ljung, age 29, a 
native of Gothenborg, Sweden, was 
last heard from in a Cable Boat on 
the Atlantic Coast, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify John Carl- 
son Ljung, Jungmansgatan 5, Goth- 
enborg, Sweden. 1-12-16 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Thomas Rowe (now aged about 
74), who was at one time a seaman 
and longshoreman on the Pacific 
Coast and also served in the Pacific 
Coast Navy Yards, will greatly oblige 
inquiring relatives by supplying such 
information. Address, Editor, Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 1-5-6 



"Absence Makes," Etc. — "How's 
your boy Josh getting along with 

his studies?" 

"Pleasantly," replied Farmer Corn- 
tossel. "He don't bother 'em none." 
— Washington Star. 



KELLEIiER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 
716 MARKET STREET AT THIRD AND KEARNY 

FALL STYLES NOW READY 
FOR YOUR INSPECTION 

Prices $30 to $50 

Union Made In Our QpEN SATURDAY EVENINGS UNTIL 10 O'CLOCK 
Own Shop 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 



P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, Nils Johansson, Chas. 
Anderson, Rasmus -2407 

Benson, S. Jensen, Henry -2176 

Bernhardsen, Chas. Kjer, Magnus 

Bernadt, H. W. Kristensen, Wm. 

Bosse, Geo. Kroon, Al. 

Brandt, Rrvid Kaskinan, Albert 

Bleile, E. Lindberg, A. C. 

Dybdal, Olaf Lange, Peter H. 

Dahl, Ludwlg Larsson, Ragnar 

Drosbeck, Carl Lalan, Joe. 

Edstrom, John Moberg, K. G. C. 

Elers, H. Nygren, Gust 

Engstrom, Erick Nilsen, Emil 

Ericksen, H. C. Ohlsson, J. W. 

Fisher, Fritz Oglive, Wm. A. 

Guthre, Raymond Olson, David 

Guildersen, E. Paulson, Herman 

Gregory, W. Palm, P. A. 

Geiger, Joe. Rensmand, Robert 

Hoten, J. Rosenberg, Adolf 

Henriks, Waldemar Swanson, John L. V. 
Hendricksen, GeorgeSorensen, Jorgen 

Hoppenbrower, P. Shallies, Gust. 

Herman, D. Thoren, Paul 

Jespersen, Martin Westengren, C. W. 

Jonsson, Karl Zaukert, Carl 
Jarwinen, John 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made HIckey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HAT?, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Patrick McFee, who was cook on 
board the schooner "Robert Henry" 
on a voyage to Mexico last year, is 
inquired for by the U. S. Shipping 
Commissioner, at San Francisco, Cal. 

9-15-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 

Eugene Martin, age 25, 6 feet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired for by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin, 4231 15 N. E., Seattle, 
Wash. 1-27-15 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 






Union 

MADE 

Beer 



AND 

Porter 

*&&> Of America rf$xr 

COPYRIGHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 
THiS lis O UK L-Ats H.L. 



DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Albers, George Krause, Otto 

Anderson, William Kuldsen, John 

Anderson, John Koster, Walter 

Anderson, Chris. Kottler, William 

Anderson, A. P. Kard, Hjalmar 

Andersen, Andrew Lindholm, John 
Andersen, Olaf -1118Lindgren, Ernst 

Bjerk, Gustav Lindroos, A. W. 

Bjerk, Geo. Lundkvist, Alarick 

Burmelster, T. Ludvigsen, Arne 

Bjorklund, G. Leedham, Max 

Benson, W. J. Lucey, James 

Bowman, C. McLeave, John 

Brogard, N. Munsen, Fred 

Bohn, Gus Nilsen, Harry 

Carlson, Adolf M. Nielsen, C. 

Carlson, Gustaf Nordman, Karl 

Carlson, Walter Olsen, W. 

Christiansen, Paaso, Andrew 

Dedrlck Pettersen, Karl 

Crentz, P. Peterson, Nels 

Davis, Frank A. Peters, Walter 

Deam, James Peltsan, Jacob 

Donalson, Harry Pedersen, Alf 

Eriksen, Ole RIsenius, Sven 

Grau, Aksil -1116 Rudt, Walter . 

Gronros, Oswald Robertson, A. 

Gronlund, Oskar Scheftner, Bernhard 

-414 Sandgvist, Junnar 

Gueno, Pierre Stemvall, Sigurd 

Harley, Alex Sward, Arnold 

Holmroos, W. Scarabosio, M. 

High, Edward Skotel, A. 

Hansen, Ove Max Toves, H. C. 

Hansen, Jack Torin, Gustaf A. 

Hansen, Thorlelf Windt, Walter 

Hylander, Gustaf Williams, T. C. 

Jensen, L. Waaler, Edgar 

Jensen, L. M. P. Wehrman, John 

John, F. Johanson Wagner, Ed. 

Johnsen, Walter Wedequist, Axel 
Johansen, A. Harry Packages. 

Johnson, Fred -1728 Benson, Charles 

Johansson, Arvo Houstor, Harry 
Johnson, Alexander 



She Knew the Game.— Mrs. Willis 
(at the ball game, as the pitcher and 
catcher hold a conference) — What 
are they talking about? 

Mr. Willis — About what to throw 
to the next batter. 

Mrs. Willis — But they aren't al- 
lowed to throw anything to him ex- 
cept the ball, are they? — Puck. 



Better Than He Knew. — Bill- 
Jones, the Welshman, has eloped 
with ma wife. 

Jack. — Wey Aa thowt he wes your 
verry best pal. 

Bill — Aye and so he is, but he 
dissent knaa yit! — Newcastle (Eng.) 
Chronicle. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 
Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Home News. 



Playbills? — The Actor Man (mod- 
estly) — As a matter of fact, I could 
show you letters from — 'cr — ladies in 
— er — almost every place in which I 
have appeared. 

The Sport (with conviction) — 
Landladies, I suppose? — Tit-Bits. 



Safe. — Black — I want to put my 
money into something safe! 

White — Try a fire-proof vault. — 
Lamb. 



Paul Laux, American, age 23, 6 
feet tall, who was last heard from 
about 4 years ago at San Jose, Cal., 
supposed to be a sailor, is inquired 
for. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify his father, Carl 
Laux, 112 E. 28th St., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 6-21-16 

Adolph Krakan, last heard of at 
Port Pirie, January, 1912, and again 
in March, 1913, from Warumbo, 118 
miles from Adelaide, South Australia, 
is inquired for by his mother at 
Hamburg, Germany. 8-25-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and 
blue eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Any information regarding Wilhelm 
Kuhme, age 27, a native of Germany, 
who was supposed to have been 
drowned in the wreck of the steam 
schooner "Francis H. Leggett," Sep- 
tember 18, 1914, will be thankfully re- 
ceived by the German Consul, San 
Francisco, Cal. 1-19-16 

Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from 
since 1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother, J. Marjama, 51 
South St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 

Bernard Baasen, a native of She- 
boygan, Wis., a former member of 
the L. S. U., who was last heard 
from at Milwaukee, Wis., April 29, is 
inquired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. Sophie Baarsen, 5ol Clinton 
street, Milwaukee, Wis. 7-5-16 



United States Senator James P. 
Clarke o